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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Codd, Nick
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Fein, David; Hamadyk, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report....

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report. Compared to control group members who were not able to access the program, treatment group members also were more likely to report that their classes used active learning methods, taught life skills, and were relevant to their lives and careers. Persisting over a three-year follow-up period, Year Up’s earnings impacts are the largest reported to date for workforce programs tested using a random assignment design. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brooks, Margaret G.; Buckner, John C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Within the context of a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 homeless and 216 low-income housed mothers, the present study examined the work experiences, barriers to employment, and facilitating factors such as education and literacy that increase the likelihood of work among low-income women. Analyses were focused on sociodemographic variables such as age, race, and marital status. Findings suggest the need for programs of education, early intervention, and job training. However, the availability of adequate jobs and affordable child care are prerequisites for poor, single mothers to become self-supporting. (author abstract)

    Within the context of a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 homeless and 216 low-income housed mothers, the present study examined the work experiences, barriers to employment, and facilitating factors such as education and literacy that increase the likelihood of work among low-income women. Analyses were focused on sociodemographic variables such as age, race, and marital status. Findings suggest the need for programs of education, early intervention, and job training. However, the availability of adequate jobs and affordable child care are prerequisites for poor, single mothers to become self-supporting. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Giffords, Elissa D.; Alonso, Christina; Bell, Richard
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Under the Runaway, Homeless, and Missing Children Protection Act in (P.L. 108-96), Congress authorized the Transitional Living Program for Older Homeless Youth (TLP). TLP provides grants to community and faith-based non-profit and public organizations for longer-term residential supports (up to 18 months) to youth ages 16-21 in order to promote their successful transition to adulthood and self-sufficiency (National Network for Youth, Issue brief: Runaway and homeless youth act reauthorization [Available online at http://www.nn4youth.org/site/DocServer/NNYandVOAFinalUpdate.pdf?docID=304], 2007). This article describes a transitional living program in Long Island, New York designed to enable youth in a residential setting (ages 16-21) to develop and internalize independent living skills through the provision of shelter and support services which prepare them for living independently in the community. (author abstract)

    Under the Runaway, Homeless, and Missing Children Protection Act in (P.L. 108-96), Congress authorized the Transitional Living Program for Older Homeless Youth (TLP). TLP provides grants to community and faith-based non-profit and public organizations for longer-term residential supports (up to 18 months) to youth ages 16-21 in order to promote their successful transition to adulthood and self-sufficiency (National Network for Youth, Issue brief: Runaway and homeless youth act reauthorization [Available online at http://www.nn4youth.org/site/DocServer/NNYandVOAFinalUpdate.pdf?docID=304], 2007). This article describes a transitional living program in Long Island, New York designed to enable youth in a residential setting (ages 16-21) to develop and internalize independent living skills through the provision of shelter and support services which prepare them for living independently in the community. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Koball, Heather; Dion, Robin; Gothro, Andrew; Bardos, Maura; Dworsky, Amy; Lansing, Jiffy; Stagner, Matthew; Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Herrera, Carla; Manning, Alice Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This report provides a synthesis of research and existing ACF resources for serving at-risk youth. It describes what we know from research about at-risk youth. It then describes how at-risk youth are currently being served by ACF programs and by programs outside of ACF that have been shown to put youth on a path toward self-sufficiency. Based on the review of research and resources, it identifies issues to consider in creating conceptual frameworks for developing and enhancing ACF programs that can or do serve at-risk youth. In the remainder of this chapter, we state the key questions that guide the synthesis, define some key concepts, and describe a number of at-risk youth populations served by ACF programs. (author abstract)

    This report provides a synthesis of research and existing ACF resources for serving at-risk youth. It describes what we know from research about at-risk youth. It then describes how at-risk youth are currently being served by ACF programs and by programs outside of ACF that have been shown to put youth on a path toward self-sufficiency. Based on the review of research and resources, it identifies issues to consider in creating conceptual frameworks for developing and enhancing ACF programs that can or do serve at-risk youth. In the remainder of this chapter, we state the key questions that guide the synthesis, define some key concepts, and describe a number of at-risk youth populations served by ACF programs. (author abstract)

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