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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Abt Associates Inc.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report provides detailed information about the planned impact analyses for the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. The PACE Impact Study is designed to answer questions about the overall program effectiveness for the nine programs in PACE, each involving a different configuration of career pathways design components.

    This report provides a description of the nine programs studied, summarizes the characteristics of the sample enrolled in each program, and specifies the hypotheses that PACE will test in separate analyses for each of the programs in the study.

    This document supplements the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation Design Report released in June 2015. (Author abstract)

     

    This report provides detailed information about the planned impact analyses for the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. The PACE Impact Study is designed to answer questions about the overall program effectiveness for the nine programs in PACE, each involving a different configuration of career pathways design components.

    This report provides a description of the nine programs studied, summarizes the characteristics of the sample enrolled in each program, and specifies the hypotheses that PACE will test in separate analyses for each of the programs in the study.

    This document supplements the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation Design Report released in June 2015. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Bos, Johannes; Porter, Kristin; Tseng, Fannie M. ; Doolittle, Fred ; Goldsmith, Deana; Vencill, Mary P.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Young people who lack postsecondary education or vocational credentials face an uphill battle in the competition for jobs. Two prior studies found that the services of the Center for Employment Training (CET) in San Jose, California, significantly increased low-income youths’ and single-mothers’ chances of finding employment and also raised their earnings. CET is noted for enrolling trainees with little prescreening, for providing training in a worklike setting, for requiring a full-time commitment from trainees, for involving employers in the design and delivery of training, for integrating instruction in basic skills into the training, and for allowing trainees to progress as they master competencies, without any fixed schedule.

    In the early 1990s, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) provided funds for CET to provide technical assistance to other organizations interested in replicating the CET model, thus adding new programs beyond CET’s traditional base in San Jose and elsewhere in the western states. This study examines the experiences of youth in twelve...

    Young people who lack postsecondary education or vocational credentials face an uphill battle in the competition for jobs. Two prior studies found that the services of the Center for Employment Training (CET) in San Jose, California, significantly increased low-income youths’ and single-mothers’ chances of finding employment and also raised their earnings. CET is noted for enrolling trainees with little prescreening, for providing training in a worklike setting, for requiring a full-time commitment from trainees, for involving employers in the design and delivery of training, for integrating instruction in basic skills into the training, and for allowing trainees to progress as they master competencies, without any fixed schedule.

    In the early 1990s, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) provided funds for CET to provide technical assistance to other organizations interested in replicating the CET model, thus adding new programs beyond CET’s traditional base in San Jose and elsewhere in the western states. This study examines the experiences of youth in twelve CET sites outside San Jose: six in eastern states and the Midwest begun as part of the DOL-sponsored replication effort and six western programs operated as part of CET’s service network. This report summarizes the implementation findings and presents initial impact findings based on a random assignment research design and a survey conducted 30 months after application to CET. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Nanda, Neha
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the randomized controlled trial evaluation of the entrepreneurial training program Startup Quest® in Florida, supported through a Workforce Innovation (WIF) USDOL grant.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the randomized controlled trial evaluation of the entrepreneurial training program Startup Quest® in Florida, supported through a Workforce Innovation (WIF) USDOL grant.

  • Individual Author: Walsh, Stephen; Goldsmith, Deana; Abe, Yasuyo; Cann, Andrea
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could...

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could benefit out-of-school youth and, in 1995, began an evaluation of efforts to replicate CET. In doing so, the Department of Labor anticipated the increased emphasis on services to out-of-school youth that would be mandated in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). WIA requires that a minimum of 30 percent of youth funds shall be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth, and encourages local programs to develop long-term, intensive services for youth. The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites targeted out-of-school youth exclusively, and sought to provide them with intensive and comprehensive services leading to employment. This report’s findings thus appear at a critical junction in the reform of employment and training services for out-of-school youth.

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites involved 12 sites in total. Six sites were located in eastern and mid-western states, and had begun their efforts to replicate CET-San Jose’s services in the early 1990s. Six additional sites were selected randomly from among those located in western states that had been operating CET programs between 5 and 20 years. All of the western sites were divisions of the CET corporation, as were two of the eastern and mid-western sites. The remaining eastern and mid-western sites included two community-based organizations and two administrative entities under the Job Training Partnership Act, the federally-funded employment and training program that preceded WIA.

    To investigate the potential benefits of CET-San Jose for out-of-school youth, the Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites was designed to examine the implementation experiences of these twelve sites, and to measure their impacts on a range of important outcomes, such as employment and earnings. This report addresses the first of these goals. It relies on data collected between 1996 and 1999 to document and explore the implementation experiences of the replication sites. A second report, scheduled for completion in 2002, will utilize long-term data on individual outcomes of CET applicants who were randomly assigned to a program group eligible for CET services or to a control group not eligible to receive these services. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Lauren Eyster; Nightingale, Demetra Smith ; Barnow, Burt S. ; O'Brien, Carolyn T. ; Trutko, John ; Kuehn, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative, describes the structure and implementation of projects by selected grantees, and provides nonexperimental analysis of the early impacts of job training in selected HGJTI-funded programs. The analysis relies on a review of grant applications and quarterly reports; visits to nine selected grantee sites; data collected from grantee training programs; quarterly earnings data from state unemployment insurance wage records; and administrative data from state and local public...

    The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative, describes the structure and implementation of projects by selected grantees, and provides nonexperimental analysis of the early impacts of job training in selected HGJTI-funded programs. The analysis relies on a review of grant applications and quarterly reports; visits to nine selected grantee sites; data collected from grantee training programs; quarterly earnings data from state unemployment insurance wage records; and administrative data from state and local public workforce system agencies. (Author abstract)

     

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