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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Kearney, Melissa S.; Levine, Phillip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The United States has experienced a remarkable 52 percent decline in teen childbearing since 1991. Understanding the causes of this decline are important for developing subsequent policies to continue this trend. This decline can be distinguished by two periods. Teen births fell at a rate of 2.5 percent per year between 1991 and 2008; that rate tripled to 7.5 percent per year between 2008 and 2012. We investigate these two periods separately. (author abstract)

    The United States has experienced a remarkable 52 percent decline in teen childbearing since 1991. Understanding the causes of this decline are important for developing subsequent policies to continue this trend. This decline can be distinguished by two periods. Teen births fell at a rate of 2.5 percent per year between 1991 and 2008; that rate tripled to 7.5 percent per year between 2008 and 2012. We investigate these two periods separately. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Astone, Nan ; Martin, Steven; Breslav, Lina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    New York City has undertaken a number of initiatives dedicated to reducing the city’s unintended teenage pregnancy rate, which in the past has been higher than other cities’ rates. These activities are characterized by a public health approach aimed at changing the context of decisions to engage in sexual activity and to contracept when sexually active. They have included developmentally appropriate comprehensive sex education from middle school onward, the removal of barriers to access contraception, and the provision of reproductive health services that are youth friendly— particularly male youth friendly. During the time the programs have been under way, teenage pregnancy rates have declined, as have rates of sexual activity. This brief is based on interviews with administrators and staff involved in the teen pregnancy prevention activities, official city documents, and publicly available sources. (author abstract)

     

    New York City has undertaken a number of initiatives dedicated to reducing the city’s unintended teenage pregnancy rate, which in the past has been higher than other cities’ rates. These activities are characterized by a public health approach aimed at changing the context of decisions to engage in sexual activity and to contracept when sexually active. They have included developmentally appropriate comprehensive sex education from middle school onward, the removal of barriers to access contraception, and the provision of reproductive health services that are youth friendly— particularly male youth friendly. During the time the programs have been under way, teenage pregnancy rates have declined, as have rates of sexual activity. This brief is based on interviews with administrators and staff involved in the teen pregnancy prevention activities, official city documents, and publicly available sources. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Assini-Meytin, Luciana C.; Green, Kerry M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Purpose

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of long-term socioeconomic consequences of teen parenting for men and women.

    Methods

    Analysis is based on the Woodlawn Study, a longitudinal study of an African-American cohort from a socially disadvantaged community in Chicago; data were collected at childhood (N = 1,242), adolescence (N = 705), young adulthood (age 32 years, N = 952), and midlife (age 42 years, N = 833). This analysis focused on the 1,050 individuals with data on teen parenting. We used propensity score matching to account for differences in background characteristics between teenage parents and their peers and used multiple imputation to account for differential attrition.

    Results

    The regression models after propensity score matching showed that at the age of 32 years, in comparison to nonteen mothers, teenage mothers were more likely to be unemployed, live in poverty, depend on welfare, and have earned a GED or completed high school compared to finishing college. At...

    Purpose

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of long-term socioeconomic consequences of teen parenting for men and women.

    Methods

    Analysis is based on the Woodlawn Study, a longitudinal study of an African-American cohort from a socially disadvantaged community in Chicago; data were collected at childhood (N = 1,242), adolescence (N = 705), young adulthood (age 32 years, N = 952), and midlife (age 42 years, N = 833). This analysis focused on the 1,050 individuals with data on teen parenting. We used propensity score matching to account for differences in background characteristics between teenage parents and their peers and used multiple imputation to account for differential attrition.

    Results

    The regression models after propensity score matching showed that at the age of 32 years, in comparison to nonteen mothers, teenage mothers were more likely to be unemployed, live in poverty, depend on welfare, and have earned a GED or completed high school compared to finishing college. At the age of 32 years, teen fathers were more likely to be without a job than nonteen fathers. At the age of 42 years, the effect of teen parenting for women remained statistically significant for education and income. There were no significant associations between teen parenting and outcomes for men at the age of 42 years.

    Conclusions

    Socioeconomic consequences of teenage parenting among African-Americans from disadvantaged background seem to be primarily concentrated in women and persist throughout adulthood. In addition to promoting the delay of parenting after the teenage years, it is critical to provide programs at early stages in the life course to mitigate the negative socioeconomic consequences of teenage motherhood as effects for women are broad. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Furstenberg, Frank F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Teen pregnancy is back in the news. After 15 years of decline, the trend in teen birth rates ticked upward in 2006. Coupled with the ongoing media spotlight on the popular film Juno and the pregnancy of Britney Spears’ younger sister, we’re once again wringing our collective hands over kids having kids. But are these concerns really warranted? To what extent does teen pregnancy lead to mothers’ and children’s long-term poverty? Have policies adopted to deter early childbearing been effective in discouraging teens from having children before they are ready to shoulder the responsibilities of parenthood? To answer these questions, it’s necessary to put the issue in proper historical context, and to cast a sober eye on existing policies that were employed to keep rates of teenage childbearing low. (author introduction)

    Teen pregnancy is back in the news. After 15 years of decline, the trend in teen birth rates ticked upward in 2006. Coupled with the ongoing media spotlight on the popular film Juno and the pregnancy of Britney Spears’ younger sister, we’re once again wringing our collective hands over kids having kids. But are these concerns really warranted? To what extent does teen pregnancy lead to mothers’ and children’s long-term poverty? Have policies adopted to deter early childbearing been effective in discouraging teens from having children before they are ready to shoulder the responsibilities of parenthood? To answer these questions, it’s necessary to put the issue in proper historical context, and to cast a sober eye on existing policies that were employed to keep rates of teenage childbearing low. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mollborn, Stefanie; Jacobs, Janet
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    The current economic and social context calls for a renewed assessment of the consequences of an early transition to parenthood. In interviews with 55 teenage mothers in Colorado, we find that they are experiencing severe economic and social strains. Financially, although most are receiving substantial help from family members and sometimes their children’s fathers, basic needs often remain unmet. Macroeconomic and family structure trends have resulted in deprived material circumstances, while welfare reform and other changes have reduced the availability of aid. Socially, families’ and communities’ disapproval of early childbearing negatively influences the support young mothers receive, their social interactions, and their experiences with social institutions. (author abstract)

    The current economic and social context calls for a renewed assessment of the consequences of an early transition to parenthood. In interviews with 55 teenage mothers in Colorado, we find that they are experiencing severe economic and social strains. Financially, although most are receiving substantial help from family members and sometimes their children’s fathers, basic needs often remain unmet. Macroeconomic and family structure trends have resulted in deprived material circumstances, while welfare reform and other changes have reduced the availability of aid. Socially, families’ and communities’ disapproval of early childbearing negatively influences the support young mothers receive, their social interactions, and their experiences with social institutions. (author abstract)

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