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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Leung, Cindy W.; Ryan-Ibarra, Suzanne; Linares, Amanda; Induni, Marta; Sugerman, Sharon; Long, Michael W.; Rimm, Eric B.; Willett, Walter C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides a vital buffer against hunger and poverty for 47.6 million Americans. Using 2013 California Dietary Practices Survey data, we assessed support for policies to strengthen the nutritional influence of SNAP. Among SNAP participants, support ranged from 74% to 93% for providing monetary incentives for fruits and vegetables, restricting purchases of sugary beverages, and providing more total benefits. Nonparticipants expressed similar levels of support. These approaches may alleviate the burden of diet-related disease in low-income populations. (author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides a vital buffer against hunger and poverty for 47.6 million Americans. Using 2013 California Dietary Practices Survey data, we assessed support for policies to strengthen the nutritional influence of SNAP. Among SNAP participants, support ranged from 74% to 93% for providing monetary incentives for fruits and vegetables, restricting purchases of sugary beverages, and providing more total benefits. Nonparticipants expressed similar levels of support. These approaches may alleviate the burden of diet-related disease in low-income populations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, Office of Research and Analysis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The statutes, regulations, and waivers of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) provide State agencies with various policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to adapt their programs to meet the needs of eligible, low-income people in their States. Certain options may facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work. This flexibility helps States better target benefits to those most in need, streamline program administration and field operations, and coordinate SNAP activities with those of other programs.

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering SNAP to determine which options are in use. Information about State agency choices among options is subject to frequent change. This report catalogs State options in effect as of November 2010. Several States have reported plans to implement various options at later dates. Those choices...

    The statutes, regulations, and waivers of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) provide State agencies with various policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to adapt their programs to meet the needs of eligible, low-income people in their States. Certain options may facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work. This flexibility helps States better target benefits to those most in need, streamline program administration and field operations, and coordinate SNAP activities with those of other programs.

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering SNAP to determine which options are in use. Information about State agency choices among options is subject to frequent change. This report catalogs State options in effect as of November 2010. Several States have reported plans to implement various options at later dates. Those choices will be reflected in future editions of this report.

    This edition tracks many of the State Options featured in previous Reports, including Simplified Reporting (SR), Narrow and Broad-Based Categorical Eligibility, and the Standard Utility Allowance (SUA) options, among others. Two options that are new to the report are the Verification of Deductible Expenses and the State Names for SNAP. In addition to mandatory verification items, State agencies have the option to mandate verification of any other factor which affects household eligibility or allotment level. This State Options Report tracks three common expenses that States choose to verify: child support, housing and child care costs. Historically, some States have opted to use their own names for their State programs. On October 1, 2008, SNAP became the new name for the Federal Food Stamp Program. Many States opted to change their program name to SNAP; other States kept the Food Stamp Program and still others use their own unique program names. In addition to a new page in the Options Profiles, the name of every State program is now listed in the State Profiles section of this report.

    Another new feature of this edition of the Report is the inclusion of regulatory citations in the upper right-hand corner of each option profile page. These will help guide the reader to the relevant provisions found in Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Section One of the report describes the options and lists the States that have selected each option. Section Two lists the 53 State agencies and the status of each State agency in relation to each policy option. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Economic Research Service
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2009

    Description: This data set provides time-series data on state and county-level estimates of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and benefit levels, combined with area estimates of total population and the number of persons in poverty. All data, except program benefit amounts, are for a selected point in time each year; program benefit levels are total benefits issued over the course of a calendar year.

    Population: SNAP state and county level estimates are provided based on data from the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program of U.S. Census Bureau. SNAP benefits issued data provided by the Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

    Periodicity: Program participation counts available from 1997-2008; counts available for program benefits up to 2011. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Data System is no longer being updated due to inconsistencies and reliability issues in the source data.

    ...

    Description: This data set provides time-series data on state and county-level estimates of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and benefit levels, combined with area estimates of total population and the number of persons in poverty. All data, except program benefit amounts, are for a selected point in time each year; program benefit levels are total benefits issued over the course of a calendar year.

    Population: SNAP state and county level estimates are provided based on data from the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program of U.S. Census Bureau. SNAP benefits issued data provided by the Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

    Periodicity: Program participation counts available from 1997-2008; counts available for program benefits up to 2011. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Data System is no longer being updated due to inconsistencies and reliability issues in the source data.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Program usage, food stamps, benefits.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Rorem, Annie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly referred to as the Food Stamp Program, provides monthly subsidies specifically for the purchase of food. The value of the monthly benefit is calculated based on income and number of individuals living in the household.

    In this brief, we summarize facts about this program, provide a quick look at 2012 SNAP participation in Virginia, and review ways in which the program is changing. (author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly referred to as the Food Stamp Program, provides monthly subsidies specifically for the purchase of food. The value of the monthly benefit is calculated based on income and number of individuals living in the household.

    In this brief, we summarize facts about this program, provide a quick look at 2012 SNAP participation in Virginia, and review ways in which the program is changing. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, Office of Research and Analysis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) statutes, regulations, and waivers provide State agencies with numerous policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to improve how the program works in meeting the nutritional needs of low-income people across the nation. Choosing certain options can facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access and sustained participation for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work, targeting benefits to those most in need, streamlining administration and field operations, and coordinating SNAP activities with those of other programs. With passage of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, and later the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, the array of policy options was significantly expanded in several key areas.

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering SNAP (formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) to determine which policy options are in use. Information about State...

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) statutes, regulations, and waivers provide State agencies with numerous policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to improve how the program works in meeting the nutritional needs of low-income people across the nation. Choosing certain options can facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access and sustained participation for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work, targeting benefits to those most in need, streamlining administration and field operations, and coordinating SNAP activities with those of other programs. With passage of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, and later the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, the array of policy options was significantly expanded in several key areas.

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering SNAP (formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) to determine which policy options are in use. Information about State agency choices among policy options is subject to frequent change. This report catalogs choices in effect as of June 2009. Several States have reported plans to implement various options at later dates. Those choices will be reflected in future editions of this report.

    Please note that this edition of the State Options Report expands the information captured regarding certain options. Simplified Reporting (SR) now includes information regarding State agencies that assign 6, 12, or 24 month certification periods to SR cases, and also identified State agencies using a combination of certification periods (see Page 3). Change Reporting Options now identifies those State agencies that have completely eliminated change, or incident reporting (see Page 4). The Transitional Benefits Option identifies State agencies that provide transitional benefits to households leaving non-TANF State funded cash assistance programs (see Page 5). Expanded Categorical Eligibility has been expanded to capture whether a State agency is using “soft” or “hard” eligibility requirements to apply this option (see Page 9). The information on the Simplified Standard Utility Allowance (SUA) shows which States employ a simplified mandatory SUA, which ones employ a non-simplified mandatory SUA, and which ones employ a non-simplified, non-mandatory SUA.

    This edition continues the tracking of two options first surveyed in the 7th edition. The first is State agencies that have implemented Combined Application Projects (CAP) (see Page 17), and the second is State agencies that are utilizing Document Imaging technology (see Page 26).

    This edition tracks three new options. The first new option is Program Integration, which identifies whether a State agency’s certification process for SNAP, TANF, and Medicaid are handled jointly (household files a single application and attends a single interview) or separately (see Page 27). The second new category is Simplified Self-Employment, which identifies those State agencies that have adopted a simplified method for determining the cost of doing business in cases with self-employment income (see Page 14). The third new category is Ineligible Aliens Income & Deductions. Ineligible aliens fall into two general categories; 1) those who are unable or unwilling to provide documentation of permanent immigration status, and 2) those classes of non-citizens listed in 7 CFR 273.11(c)(3). This category would include persons who, under the Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA), were lawfully admitted for permanent residence, granted asylum under section 208, admitted as a refugee under section 207, paroled in accordance with section 212(d)(5), deportation or removal has been withheld in accordance with section 243, is aged, blind, or disabled in accordance with section 1614(a)(1) of the Social Security Act and is admitted for temporary or permanent residence under section 245A(b)(1) of the INA, or is a special agricultural worker admitted for temporary residence under section 210(a). For each of these categories State agencies have two options on how to handle income and deductions (see Page 18).

    Two options tracked in previous editions, Nutrition Education and Outreach Initiatives, and Employment and Training Pledge States, have been dropped from this edition.

    Section One of the report describes the options and lists the States that have selected each of them. The options presented here from the Farm Bill are denoted with the Farm Bill logo. Information is shown in tabular and map formats. Section Two lists the 53 State agencies in alphabetical order and shows the status of each State agency in relation to each policy option. (author introduction)

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