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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    The article discusses how federal funding can support noncustodial fathers in terms of employment difficulties and in their parental obligations through child support awards payment. It states that there is a need for federal government to direct additional funding to employment-oriented programs for low-income fathers in the child support program. It mentions that both mandatory and voluntary employment-oriented programs can be beneficial for low-income fathers and their children, considering that they can help increase the income of fathers. It adds that the low-income fathers can take advantage to the programs through employment-oriented services, case management, and training. (author introduction)

    The article discusses how federal funding can support noncustodial fathers in terms of employment difficulties and in their parental obligations through child support awards payment. It states that there is a need for federal government to direct additional funding to employment-oriented programs for low-income fathers in the child support program. It mentions that both mandatory and voluntary employment-oriented programs can be beneficial for low-income fathers and their children, considering that they can help increase the income of fathers. It adds that the low-income fathers can take advantage to the programs through employment-oriented services, case management, and training. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mincy, Ronald B.; Klempin, Serena; Schmidt, Heather
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Both wages and labor force participation have been declining for young, less-educated men since the mid-1970s. The purpose of this article is to examine how key income-security policy areas—including unemployment insurance, payroll taxes and the Earned Income Tax Credit, and child support enforcement—affect these men. The article concludes with policy recommendations to improve the impact of work-based subsidies on poverty among low-income men. Subsidized jobs in transitional job programs could play a critical role in helping these men to access these subsidies. (author abstract)

    Both wages and labor force participation have been declining for young, less-educated men since the mid-1970s. The purpose of this article is to examine how key income-security policy areas—including unemployment insurance, payroll taxes and the Earned Income Tax Credit, and child support enforcement—affect these men. The article concludes with policy recommendations to improve the impact of work-based subsidies on poverty among low-income men. Subsidized jobs in transitional job programs could play a critical role in helping these men to access these subsidies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Many of the nation's most vexing domestic problems are linked with negative behaviors of and problems experienced by adolescent boys and young men. Delinquency and crime, school dropout, unemployment and nonwork, nonmarital births, and poverty are all associated disproportionally with young men. Two sets of public policies--wage subsidies and work requirements--that hold promise for helping young men increase their employment and earnings could thereby alleviate many of these social problems, especially poverty. (author abstract)

    Many of the nation's most vexing domestic problems are linked with negative behaviors of and problems experienced by adolescent boys and young men. Delinquency and crime, school dropout, unemployment and nonwork, nonmarital births, and poverty are all associated disproportionally with young men. Two sets of public policies--wage subsidies and work requirements--that hold promise for helping young men increase their employment and earnings could thereby alleviate many of these social problems, especially poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta; Carrano, Jennifer; Ericson, Sara; Mbwana, Kassim
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Men who are experiencing financial hardships or problems with employment often encounter difficulties with becoming responsible fathers (Kotloff, 2005). In the last few decades, the United States has experienced a decline in the availability of employment opportunities for unskilled males, yet few policies or programs are aimed at helping such men support their families (Bronte-Tinkew, Bowie, & Moore, 2007; Edin & Nelson, 2001; Kasarda, 1989; Wilson, 1996). Although all fathers may face difficulties with financial hardship and employment problems, young fathers and nonresident fathers (i.e. fathers who do not reside with their children) are particularly vulnerable, as they are more likely to have low levels of education and job experience, to be in poor health, to have a history of involvement with the criminal justice system, to earn low hourly wages, and to work fewer hours (The Future of Children, 2004). A lack of employment opportunities is of particular concern because the lack of stable employment and adequate income limits fathers’ ability to financially support...

    Men who are experiencing financial hardships or problems with employment often encounter difficulties with becoming responsible fathers (Kotloff, 2005). In the last few decades, the United States has experienced a decline in the availability of employment opportunities for unskilled males, yet few policies or programs are aimed at helping such men support their families (Bronte-Tinkew, Bowie, & Moore, 2007; Edin & Nelson, 2001; Kasarda, 1989; Wilson, 1996). Although all fathers may face difficulties with financial hardship and employment problems, young fathers and nonresident fathers (i.e. fathers who do not reside with their children) are particularly vulnerable, as they are more likely to have low levels of education and job experience, to be in poor health, to have a history of involvement with the criminal justice system, to earn low hourly wages, and to work fewer hours (The Future of Children, 2004). A lack of employment opportunities is of particular concern because the lack of stable employment and adequate income limits fathers’ ability to financially support children, including difficulty making child support payments (Sorenson & Lerman, 1998). Studies show that fathers often want to provide financial support to their children, but lack the means to do so (National Women’s Law Center, 2004). While some programs do exist to help fathers gain stable employment, increase their incomes, and make child support payments, few fathers are currently served by such programs (Bronte-Tinkew, Bowie, & Moore, 2007; (Bronte-Tinkew, Burkhauser, Mbwana, Metz, & Collins, 2008; Bronte-Tinkew, Burkhauser, & Metz, 2008) Johnson, Levine, & Doolittle, 1999). The current review examines a number of employment/self-sufficiency programs for fathers that have been evaluated and that can begin to answer the following questions: What practices have been found to be successful in programs aimed at increasing self-sufficiency and employment among low-income fathers? What matters? What really works? This review helps to begin answering these questions more definitively. (author introduction)

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