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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation gives an overview of the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) funded by HHS's Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD) funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, and it provides early data and observations from programs included in both projects.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation gives an overview of the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) funded by HHS's Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD) funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, and it provides early data and observations from programs included in both projects.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Yahner, Jennifer; Zweig, Janine M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD) a rigorous evaluation of the TJ model, designed to test its effectiveness compared to a standard set of job search (JS) activities for recently released prisoners (Redcross et al., 2010). More than 1,800 male former prisoners were randomly assigned to either a TJ program or JS program in each of four states, and their employment and recidivism outcomes were followed two years after random assignment. Despite this somewhat discouraging picture of the first-year follow-up results from the overall TJRD evaluation, it is still possible for specific TJ program strategies to have functioned successfully as mediators affecting client outcomes--and practitioners in the field are hungry for such information. Program implementers want to know about the relative contribution that different program strategies within the TJ model--such as length of time in a transitional job, receipt of job readiness/development assistance, case management services, and supportive payments--make to participant outcomes. The TJRD study provides a unique...

    The Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD) a rigorous evaluation of the TJ model, designed to test its effectiveness compared to a standard set of job search (JS) activities for recently released prisoners (Redcross et al., 2010). More than 1,800 male former prisoners were randomly assigned to either a TJ program or JS program in each of four states, and their employment and recidivism outcomes were followed two years after random assignment. Despite this somewhat discouraging picture of the first-year follow-up results from the overall TJRD evaluation, it is still possible for specific TJ program strategies to have functioned successfully as mediators affecting client outcomes--and practitioners in the field are hungry for such information. Program implementers want to know about the relative contribution that different program strategies within the TJ model--such as length of time in a transitional job, receipt of job readiness/development assistance, case management services, and supportive payments--make to participant outcomes. The TJRD study provides a unique opportunity for us to explore the comparative effectiveness of these specific TJ program components. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Neumark, David; Grijalva, Diego
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    State and federal policymakers grappling with the aftermath of the Great Recession have sought ways to spur job creation, in many cases adopting hiring credits to encourage employers to create new jobs. However, there is virtually no evidence on the effects of these kinds of counter-recessionary hiring credits – the only evidence coming from much earlier studies of the federal New Jobs Tax Credit in the 1970s. This paper provides evidence on the effect on job growth of hiring credits adopted by states during the Great Recession. For many of the types of hiring credits we examine we do not find positive effects on job growth. However, some specific types of hiring credits – including those targeting the unemployed and those that allow states to recapture credits when job creation goals are not met – appear to have succeeded in boosting job growth. At the same time, some credits appear to generate hiring without increasing employment or to generate much more hiring than net employment growth, consistent with these credits leading to churning of employees that raises the costs of...

    State and federal policymakers grappling with the aftermath of the Great Recession have sought ways to spur job creation, in many cases adopting hiring credits to encourage employers to create new jobs. However, there is virtually no evidence on the effects of these kinds of counter-recessionary hiring credits – the only evidence coming from much earlier studies of the federal New Jobs Tax Credit in the 1970s. This paper provides evidence on the effect on job growth of hiring credits adopted by states during the Great Recession. For many of the types of hiring credits we examine we do not find positive effects on job growth. However, some specific types of hiring credits – including those targeting the unemployed and those that allow states to recapture credits when job creation goals are not met – appear to have succeeded in boosting job growth. At the same time, some credits appear to generate hiring without increasing employment or to generate much more hiring than net employment growth, consistent with these credits leading to churning of employees that raises the costs of producing jobs via hiring credits. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Card, David ; Robins, Philip K. ; Mijanovich, Tod ; Lin, Winston
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report presents an analysis of the early impacts of the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) on employment, earnings, and welfare receipt. (author abstract)

    This report presents an analysis of the early impacts of the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) on employment, earnings, and welfare receipt. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Social Research and Demonstration Corporation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report summarizes the early findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), including lessons learned from implementing the project, from focus groups held with participants, and from an examination of the program’s effects on employment, earnings, and income assistance receipt in the first 18 months after random assignment. (author abstract)

    This report summarizes the early findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), including lessons learned from implementing the project, from focus groups held with participants, and from an examination of the program’s effects on employment, earnings, and income assistance receipt in the first 18 months after random assignment. (author abstract)

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