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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lippman, Laura; Ryberg, Renee; Carney, Rachel; Moore, Kristin Anderson
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Soft skills are skills, competencies, behaviors, attitudes, and personal qualities that enable youth to navigate their environment, work with others, perform well, and achieve their goals. We’ve identified five key soft skills that — according to researchers, employers, youth, and program implementers — most enable youth (15-29) worldwide to be successful in the workplace. (author abstract)

    Soft skills are skills, competencies, behaviors, attitudes, and personal qualities that enable youth to navigate their environment, work with others, perform well, and achieve their goals. We’ve identified five key soft skills that — according to researchers, employers, youth, and program implementers — most enable youth (15-29) worldwide to be successful in the workplace. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cavadel, Elizabeth W.; Kauff, Jacqueline F. ; Anderson, Mary Anne ; McConnell, Sheena M.; Derr, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that...

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that have been successful in other contexts. In addition, the report provides examples of employment programs that have incorporated interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment and discusses the importance and challenges of measuring the success of such interventions. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Bergman, Lars; Duckworth, Kathryn; Kokko, Katja; Lyyra, Anna-Liisa; Metzger, Molly; Pulkkinen, Lea; Simonton, Sharon
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    Under what conditions can parents succeed in passing their socioeconomic advantages on to their children by boosting their children’s job-related skills and behaviors? In equal opportunity societies, institutions and other policies boost the skills and behaviors of low-socioeconomic status (SES) children in ways that fully offset the skill and behavioral advantages imparted by parent efforts. Unequal opportunity societies—those allowing school and neighborhood quality to reinforce family advantage and disadvantage— should see growing skill and behavior gaps between high- and low-SES children across childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood—and substantial intergenerational inequality.

    This chapter focuses on the indirect skill- and behavior-based process of intergenerational inequality using five data sets from four countries: the United Kingdom, the United States, Sweden, and Finland. All of our data sets provide representative samples of children drawn from national or large community populations; measure the completed schooling of parents and children; and, most...

    Under what conditions can parents succeed in passing their socioeconomic advantages on to their children by boosting their children’s job-related skills and behaviors? In equal opportunity societies, institutions and other policies boost the skills and behaviors of low-socioeconomic status (SES) children in ways that fully offset the skill and behavioral advantages imparted by parent efforts. Unequal opportunity societies—those allowing school and neighborhood quality to reinforce family advantage and disadvantage— should see growing skill and behavior gaps between high- and low-SES children across childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood—and substantial intergenerational inequality.

    This chapter focuses on the indirect skill- and behavior-based process of intergenerational inequality using five data sets from four countries: the United Kingdom, the United States, Sweden, and Finland. All of our data sets provide representative samples of children drawn from national or large community populations; measure the completed schooling of parents and children; and, most important, measure an assortment of important skills and behaviors in both middle childhood (ages seven and ten) and adolescence (age thirteen through sixteen).

    Our key objective is to estimate cross-country differences in the extent to which child skills and behaviors account for intergenerational correlations in the completed schooling of parents and their grown children. The mediational role of children’s skills and behaviors is, in turn, a product of two factors: how strongly parent SES determines children’s skills and behaviors and the importance of children’s skills and behaviors for their adult attainments. Both factors need to be at work if skills and behaviors are to play an important mediational role. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: García, Emma
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Multiple traits compose a broad definition of what it means to be an educated person. Indisputably, being an educated person is associated with having a certain command of a curriculum, and knowledge of theories and facts from various disciplines. But the term educated also suggests a more far-reaching concept associated with individuals’ full development. Such development implies, for example, that individuals are equipped with traits and skills—such as critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, social skills, persistence, creativity, and self-control—that allow them to contribute meaningfully to society and to succeed in their public lives, workplaces, homes, and other societal contexts. These traits are often called, generically, noncognitive skills.

    Despite noncognitive skills’ central roles in our education and, more broadly, our lives, education analysis and policy have tended to overlook their importance. Thus, there are currently few strategies to nurture them within the school context or through education policies. However, after a relatively prolonged lack...

    Multiple traits compose a broad definition of what it means to be an educated person. Indisputably, being an educated person is associated with having a certain command of a curriculum, and knowledge of theories and facts from various disciplines. But the term educated also suggests a more far-reaching concept associated with individuals’ full development. Such development implies, for example, that individuals are equipped with traits and skills—such as critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, social skills, persistence, creativity, and self-control—that allow them to contribute meaningfully to society and to succeed in their public lives, workplaces, homes, and other societal contexts. These traits are often called, generically, noncognitive skills.

    Despite noncognitive skills’ central roles in our education and, more broadly, our lives, education analysis and policy have tended to overlook their importance. Thus, there are currently few strategies to nurture them within the school context or through education policies. However, after a relatively prolonged lack of consideration, noncognitive skills are again beginning to be acknowledged in discussions about education, leading to the need for thoughtful and concerted attention from researchers, policymakers, and practitioners.

    This paper contends that noncognitive skills should be an explicit pillar of education policy. It contributes to the growing interest in these skills by reviewing what we know about noncognitive skills, including what they are, why they matter, and how they enter into the education process. We then extend the discussion by providing a tentative list of skills that are both important for and can be nurtured by schools. Contrasting what we know about noncognitive skills with how policy currently treats them, we contend that noncognitive skills deserve more attention in the education policy arena. Toward this end, we propose some guidelines for how to design education policies that better nurture them, and describe the kinds of research needed to inform policy and practice. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Boguslaw, Janet; Hong, Philip
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) and the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOGUP) Research Grants are two initiatives of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. On September 17, 2013, they co-hosted a Webinar titled Mutually Beneficial Partnerships: Lessons from Two Research/Practice Partnership Projects. The Webinar began with an overview of the SSRC and OPRE’s HPOG research and evaluation portfolio and featured Dr. Janet Boguslaw and Dr. Philip Hong who presented their HPOGUP projects. This is the transcript from the Webinar.

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) and the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOGUP) Research Grants are two initiatives of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. On September 17, 2013, they co-hosted a Webinar titled Mutually Beneficial Partnerships: Lessons from Two Research/Practice Partnership Projects. The Webinar began with an overview of the SSRC and OPRE’s HPOG research and evaluation portfolio and featured Dr. Janet Boguslaw and Dr. Philip Hong who presented their HPOGUP projects. This is the transcript from the Webinar.

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