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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Codd, Nick
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kroner, Mark J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Experience living independently while still in care can play a key role in developing self-sufficiency skills for foster youth. Can a comprehensive housing program in Ohio be replicated in other communities? (Author abstract)

    Experience living independently while still in care can play a key role in developing self-sufficiency skills for foster youth. Can a comprehensive housing program in Ohio be replicated in other communities? (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Labor
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 2012

    The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) of the U.S. Department of Labor (Department) issues this final rule to implement the YouthBuild Transfer Act of 2006 (Transfer Act), which establishes the YouthBuild program in the Department under subtitle D of Title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) as amended. The final rule clarifies the requirements of the Transfer Act for YouthBuild program providers and participants. The final rule sets the standards under which YouthBuild program providers can carry out the goals of the program, which are to assist at-risk youth in obtaining a High School diploma or General Educational Development (GED) diploma and acquiring occupational skills training that leads to employment through the construction/rehabilitation of housing for low-income or homeless individuals and families in the community. (author abstract)

    77 Fed. Reg. 9111 (2012).

    The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) of the U.S. Department of Labor (Department) issues this final rule to implement the YouthBuild Transfer Act of 2006 (Transfer Act), which establishes the YouthBuild program in the Department under subtitle D of Title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) as amended. The final rule clarifies the requirements of the Transfer Act for YouthBuild program providers and participants. The final rule sets the standards under which YouthBuild program providers can carry out the goals of the program, which are to assist at-risk youth in obtaining a High School diploma or General Educational Development (GED) diploma and acquiring occupational skills training that leads to employment through the construction/rehabilitation of housing for low-income or homeless individuals and families in the community. (author abstract)

    77 Fed. Reg. 9111 (2012).

  • Individual Author: Proscio, Tony
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Despite its high employment rate, the Near Northside Neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas, has a median income more than 40% below the citywide level. In 1999, the Near Northside Partners' Council (NNPC) became one of five centers for the national Neighborhood Jobs Initiative Demonstration. After extensive planning, the Neighborhood Jobs Initiative started full operation in Fort Worth's Near Northside in 2000. The Initiative is using a place-based approach to addressing the intermingled issues of culture, work, and intergenerational poverty by relying heavily on a network of cooperating community organizations with different specialties, including the Tarrant County College. The Initiative's initial objective has been to bring the level of adult employment among the heavily Latino neighborhood's residents to the level of the surrounding region over a period of several years while simultaneously working to increase the wages and quality of neighborhood residents' employment. Other areas on which the Initiative is placing special emphasis include encouraging more women to enter...

    Despite its high employment rate, the Near Northside Neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas, has a median income more than 40% below the citywide level. In 1999, the Near Northside Partners' Council (NNPC) became one of five centers for the national Neighborhood Jobs Initiative Demonstration. After extensive planning, the Neighborhood Jobs Initiative started full operation in Fort Worth's Near Northside in 2000. The Initiative is using a place-based approach to addressing the intermingled issues of culture, work, and intergenerational poverty by relying heavily on a network of cooperating community organizations with different specialties, including the Tarrant County College. The Initiative's initial objective has been to bring the level of adult employment among the heavily Latino neighborhood's residents to the level of the surrounding region over a period of several years while simultaneously working to increase the wages and quality of neighborhood residents' employment. Other areas on which the Initiative is placing special emphasis include encouraging more women to enter training and employment, improving residents' English, meeting the need for workers with computer skills, and managing the evolving program in a manner permitting quick response to new opportunities. As of mid-2001, the Initiative's APEX (Achieving Program Excellence) program had served roughly 200 people (about 2% of the neighborhood's population). (MN) (ERIC abstract)

  • Individual Author: Watson, Vicki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    Poverty has begun to increase slowly over the last decade. In 1985, 18.7 percent of the total population lived below the poverty level. By 1992, this percentage had increased to 19.4. The many problems faced by poor people provide a strong case for an approach which looks at meeting needs holistically (Le., meeting the needs of a family from housing to health care, day care and transportation to job and education assistance).

    Attaining financial self-sufficiency generally requires that a family or an individual receive a variety of services, generally sequenced over time. These may include education, job training, parenting, household budgeting, job search assistance, housing assistance, health or medical assistance, day care, and transportation assistance. Assistance is provided within a context of mutual responsibility entered into by the family or individual and the service providers, in which the provision of all or some of the services or assistance is predicated on the client's undertaking specific activities and attaining certain goals. The type and duration of...

    Poverty has begun to increase slowly over the last decade. In 1985, 18.7 percent of the total population lived below the poverty level. By 1992, this percentage had increased to 19.4. The many problems faced by poor people provide a strong case for an approach which looks at meeting needs holistically (Le., meeting the needs of a family from housing to health care, day care and transportation to job and education assistance).

    Attaining financial self-sufficiency generally requires that a family or an individual receive a variety of services, generally sequenced over time. These may include education, job training, parenting, household budgeting, job search assistance, housing assistance, health or medical assistance, day care, and transportation assistance. Assistance is provided within a context of mutual responsibility entered into by the family or individual and the service providers, in which the provision of all or some of the services or assistance is predicated on the client's undertaking specific activities and attaining certain goals. The type and duration of activities undertaken for the goal of self-sufficiency and the nature and levels of interim benchmarks or accomplishments will vary, in large part based on the resources, capabilities, and starting point of the family or person beginning the process of trying to reach self-sufficiency.

    This guidebook examines Michigan's HOME job training demonstration program to explore the use of the HOME program to spur financial self-sufficiency for low-income people. Other examples of housing used to further self-sufficiency include the Family Self-Sufficiency component of the Section 8 program and Texas's use of RTC properties to provide self-sufficiency opportunities for public housing residents, among others. In the FSS program, eligible Section 8 and public housing residents are provided opportunities for education, job training, counseling and other forms of social service assistance, while living in assisted housing, so that they may obtain the education, employment, and business and social skills necessary to achieve self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

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