Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1988

    This statute made several changes that affect the Child Support Enforcement program under title IV-D of the Social Security Act, relating to paternity establishment, wage withholding, and job opportunities and basic skills training.

    Public Law No. 100-485 (1988).

     

    This statute made several changes that affect the Child Support Enforcement program under title IV-D of the Social Security Act, relating to paternity establishment, wage withholding, and job opportunities and basic skills training.

    Public Law No. 100-485 (1988).

     

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Earl S.; Levine, Ann; Doolittle, Fred C.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1999

    This book examines the experiences of 32 men participating in Parents' Fair Share (PFS), which was designed to help them get better jobs, pay child support, and become more involved with their children. All participants were low-income, noncustodial fathers who were not paying court mandated child support. Most were African American or Latino and lived in inner city, low-income neighborhoods. Data came from semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, and observations. Participants offered their opinions of and reactions to PFS and discussed whether it helped them become consistent child support payers. They also discussed their lives outside of PFS, articulating obstacles encountered when trying to become more active parents. Eight appendixes present sample data and research methodology; maps; lists and descriptions of peer support sessions; family tree; personal shields; profiles of two participants deciding how to use their money; profiles of selected participants; questions for noncustodial parents in PFS; and profile of interviewees. (author abstract)

    This book examines the experiences of 32 men participating in Parents' Fair Share (PFS), which was designed to help them get better jobs, pay child support, and become more involved with their children. All participants were low-income, noncustodial fathers who were not paying court mandated child support. Most were African American or Latino and lived in inner city, low-income neighborhoods. Data came from semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, and observations. Participants offered their opinions of and reactions to PFS and discussed whether it helped them become consistent child support payers. They also discussed their lives outside of PFS, articulating obstacles encountered when trying to become more active parents. Eight appendixes present sample data and research methodology; maps; lists and descriptions of peer support sessions; family tree; personal shields; profiles of two participants deciding how to use their money; profiles of selected participants; questions for noncustodial parents in PFS; and profile of interviewees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Lippold, Kye
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    To help low-income noncustodial parents find work and pay child support, the New York Legislature enacted the Strengthening Families Through Stronger Fathers Initiative in 2006, offering a refundable tax credit and work-oriented programs to noncustodial parents. This report summarizes findings from our evaluation of the initiative and discusses the characteristics of noncustodial parents who participated. These findings suggest that allocating new funding to the employment-oriented component of the initiative and extending the tax credit would improve employment outcomes and child support compliance among noncustodial parents. (author abstract)

    To help low-income noncustodial parents find work and pay child support, the New York Legislature enacted the Strengthening Families Through Stronger Fathers Initiative in 2006, offering a refundable tax credit and work-oriented programs to noncustodial parents. This report summarizes findings from our evaluation of the initiative and discusses the characteristics of noncustodial parents who participated. These findings suggest that allocating new funding to the employment-oriented component of the initiative and extending the tax credit would improve employment outcomes and child support compliance among noncustodial parents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    New York launched a pilot employment program to help parents behind in their child support in four communities between 2006 and 2009. The program was part of the state's Strengthening Families Through Stronger Fathers Initiative. Our evaluation found that the program's combination of employment assistance, case management, and other support services substantially increased the earnings and child support payments of disadvantaged parents who were not meeting their child support obligations. (author abstract)

    New York launched a pilot employment program to help parents behind in their child support in four communities between 2006 and 2009. The program was part of the state's Strengthening Families Through Stronger Fathers Initiative. Our evaluation found that the program's combination of employment assistance, case management, and other support services substantially increased the earnings and child support payments of disadvantaged parents who were not meeting their child support obligations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spaulding, Shayne; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Wallace, Dee
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Presents findings from P/PV's evaluation of Fathers at Work, a national demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, designed to help low-income noncustodial fathers increase their employment and earnings, become more involved in their children's lives, and provide them with more consistent financial support. The Fathers at Work programs offered a unique combination of job training and placement, child support and fatherhood services at six well-established community-based organizations in Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, CA; and Roanoke, VA. Our findings suggest that the programs produced important benefits for participants, including increased earnings and child support payment. The report details the specific strategies Fathers at Work programs used and explores the policy implications of this research. (author abstract)

    Presents findings from P/PV's evaluation of Fathers at Work, a national demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, designed to help low-income noncustodial fathers increase their employment and earnings, become more involved in their children's lives, and provide them with more consistent financial support. The Fathers at Work programs offered a unique combination of job training and placement, child support and fatherhood services at six well-established community-based organizations in Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, CA; and Roanoke, VA. Our findings suggest that the programs produced important benefits for participants, including increased earnings and child support payment. The report details the specific strategies Fathers at Work programs used and explores the policy implications of this research. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1988 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations