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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Levesque, Karen; Lauen, Doug; Teitelbaum, Peter; Alt, Martha; Librera, Sally
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Vocational education at the turn of the century is an enterprise in transition. This publication addresses the primary question about the size of the enterprise at the secondary and postsecondary levels and whether it is growing, shrinking, or holding constant over time. The report also examines high school transcripts and presents findings about the academic preparation of high school students who participate in vocational education, relevant school reform efforts, and transitions after high school. To set the context for understanding these findings, the report describes economic and labor market trends and their implications for vocational programs, as well as changing workplace practices and employer perspectives on worker skills and proficiency. (Author abstract)

    Vocational education at the turn of the century is an enterprise in transition. This publication addresses the primary question about the size of the enterprise at the secondary and postsecondary levels and whether it is growing, shrinking, or holding constant over time. The report also examines high school transcripts and presents findings about the academic preparation of high school students who participate in vocational education, relevant school reform efforts, and transitions after high school. To set the context for understanding these findings, the report describes economic and labor market trends and their implications for vocational programs, as well as changing workplace practices and employer perspectives on worker skills and proficiency. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Spielvogel, Bryn; Kull, Melissa
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    Economic inequality and ensuing economic stratification in educational and community contexts are growing in the United States. Given these patterns, it is essential to understand the implications of economic stratification in early education settings. This paper delineates repercussions of the concentration of poor children in preschool programs using lagged structural equation models estimated in two longitudinal studies following 3396 4-year-old children in 486 primarily publicly-funded preschool classrooms through kindergarten entrance. Concentrated poverty in preschool classrooms was associated with lower language and reading skills in kindergarten in part through children's exposure to less cognitively-skilled peers, with teacher instructional quality not serving as a reliable mediator. These associations did not emerge in relation to children's math skills. Results expand conceptual models of peer effects and inform preschool policies which seek to increase quality and equity and enhance children's learning. (Author abstract)

    Economic inequality and ensuing economic stratification in educational and community contexts are growing in the United States. Given these patterns, it is essential to understand the implications of economic stratification in early education settings. This paper delineates repercussions of the concentration of poor children in preschool programs using lagged structural equation models estimated in two longitudinal studies following 3396 4-year-old children in 486 primarily publicly-funded preschool classrooms through kindergarten entrance. Concentrated poverty in preschool classrooms was associated with lower language and reading skills in kindergarten in part through children's exposure to less cognitively-skilled peers, with teacher instructional quality not serving as a reliable mediator. These associations did not emerge in relation to children's math skills. Results expand conceptual models of peer effects and inform preschool policies which seek to increase quality and equity and enhance children's learning. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Beattie, Irenee R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Life course scholarship considers how institutional contexts, such as schools, influence adolescent development. Likewise, educational scholars examine how high school experiences influence nonacademic life course outcomes. This study connects these disparate research areas to determine how high school curricular tracks relate to racial/ethnic differences in welfare dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) data, the author finds that college preparatory coursework provides greater benefits to White women than to Black and Latina women in helping them avoid early welfare receipt. This benefit accrues largely through lowering their chances of dropping out of high school. Theoretical implications and relevance to the current policy environment are discussed. (Author abstract)

    Life course scholarship considers how institutional contexts, such as schools, influence adolescent development. Likewise, educational scholars examine how high school experiences influence nonacademic life course outcomes. This study connects these disparate research areas to determine how high school curricular tracks relate to racial/ethnic differences in welfare dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) data, the author finds that college preparatory coursework provides greater benefits to White women than to Black and Latina women in helping them avoid early welfare receipt. This benefit accrues largely through lowering their chances of dropping out of high school. Theoretical implications and relevance to the current policy environment are discussed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Rucker C.; Kalil, Ariel; Dunifon, Rachel E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Using data from five waves of the Women’s Employment Survey (WES; 1997-2003), we examine the links between low-income mothers’ employment experiences and the emotional well-being and academic progress of their children.  We find robust linkages between several different dimensions of mothers’ employment experiences and child outcomes.  The pattern of results is remarkably similar across all of our empirical approaches—including hierarchical random effects models with an unusually extensive set of controls, child fixed effect models, and instrumental variables estimates.  First, children exhibit fewer behavior problems when their mothers work and experience job stability (relative to children whose mothers  do not work).  In contrast, maternal work accompanied by job instability is associated with significantly higher child behavior problems (relative to job stability).  Children whose mothers work full-time and/or have fluctuating levels of work hours or irregular schedules also exhibit significantly higher levels of behavior problems. However, full-time work has negative...

    Using data from five waves of the Women’s Employment Survey (WES; 1997-2003), we examine the links between low-income mothers’ employment experiences and the emotional well-being and academic progress of their children.  We find robust linkages between several different dimensions of mothers’ employment experiences and child outcomes.  The pattern of results is remarkably similar across all of our empirical approaches—including hierarchical random effects models with an unusually extensive set of controls, child fixed effect models, and instrumental variables estimates.  First, children exhibit fewer behavior problems when their mothers work and experience job stability (relative to children whose mothers  do not work).  In contrast, maternal work accompanied by job instability is associated with significantly higher child behavior problems (relative to job stability).  Children whose mothers work full-time and/or have fluctuating levels of work hours or irregular schedules also exhibit significantly higher levels of behavior problems. However, full-time work has negative consequences for children only when it is in jobs that offer limited potential for wage growth.  Such negative  consequences are completely offset when this work experience is in jobs that require the cognitive skills that lead to higher wage growth prospects.  Finally, fluctuating levels of work hours are also strongly associated with the probability that the child will repeat a grade or  be placed in special education.  These results suggest that “welfare reform,” when considered more broadly to include the new landscape of employment for low-income mothers, has imposed some risks to children’s development. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Belsky, Jay; Lowe Vandell, Deborah; Burchinal, Margaret; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; McCartney, Kathleen; Tresch Owen, Margaret
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Effects of early child care on children's functioning from 4 1/2 years through the end of 6th grade (M age=12.0 years) were examined in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n=1,364). The results indicated that although parenting was a stronger and more consistent predictor of children's development than early child-care experience, higher quality care predicted higher vocabulary scores and more exposure to center care predicted more teacher-reported externalizing problems. Discussion focuses on mechanisms responsible for these effects, the potential collective consequences of small child-care effects, and the importance of ongoing follow-up at age 15. (Author abstract)

    Effects of early child care on children's functioning from 4 1/2 years through the end of 6th grade (M age=12.0 years) were examined in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n=1,364). The results indicated that although parenting was a stronger and more consistent predictor of children's development than early child-care experience, higher quality care predicted higher vocabulary scores and more exposure to center care predicted more teacher-reported externalizing problems. Discussion focuses on mechanisms responsible for these effects, the potential collective consequences of small child-care effects, and the importance of ongoing follow-up at age 15. (Author abstract)

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