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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: La Vigne, Nancy G.; Mamalian, Cynthia A.; Travis, Jeremy; Visher, Christy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The number of people released from Illinois prisons increased by 157 percent over the past two decades. Half of those released from prison in 2001 returned to the city of Chicago, and many were even more concentrated within a few distressed neighborhoods. This report describes the process of prisoner reentry in Illinois by examining the policy context surrounding reentry, the characteristics of Illinois' returning inmates, the geographic distribution of returning prisoners, and the social and economic climates of the communities that are home to the highest concentrations of returning prisoners. (author abstract)

    The number of people released from Illinois prisons increased by 157 percent over the past two decades. Half of those released from prison in 2001 returned to the city of Chicago, and many were even more concentrated within a few distressed neighborhoods. This report describes the process of prisoner reentry in Illinois by examining the policy context surrounding reentry, the characteristics of Illinois' returning inmates, the geographic distribution of returning prisoners, and the social and economic climates of the communities that are home to the highest concentrations of returning prisoners. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sweeten, Gary; Apel, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability...

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability of formal employment, we find no adverse effect on wages among those who are employed. We find that the most consistent negative outcomes attributable to the experience of incarceration are related to educational attainment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Harris, Yvette R.; Graham, James A.; Carpenter, Gloria J. O.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2010

    This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. This book conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child.

    Children of Incarcerated Parents addresses developmental and clinical issues experienced throughout the trajectory of childhood and adolescence with a focus on interventions and social policies to improve outcomes for this under-studied group.The chapters explore individual, community, and national levels of policy, programming, and legislation. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents:

    Section One: Framework

    Chapter One: The Changing Landscape in the American Prison Population: Implications for Children of Incarcerated Parents, James A. Graham, Yvette R. Harris, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Two: Parents "in...

    This book serves as a comprehensive source for understanding and intervening with children of incarcerated parents. The text examines the daunting clinical implications inherent in trauma throughout development, as well as social and political roles in ameliorating intergenerational delinquency. This book conceptualizes the problem by using an ecological framework that is focused on the experience of the child.

    Children of Incarcerated Parents addresses developmental and clinical issues experienced throughout the trajectory of childhood and adolescence with a focus on interventions and social policies to improve outcomes for this under-studied group.The chapters explore individual, community, and national levels of policy, programming, and legislation. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents:

    Section One: Framework

    Chapter One: The Changing Landscape in the American Prison Population: Implications for Children of Incarcerated Parents, James A. Graham, Yvette R. Harris, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Two: Parents "in the System:" An Ecological Systems Approach to the Development of Children with Incarcerated Parents, Tabitha R. Holmes, Kimberley Belmonte, Margaret Wentworth, and Kathleen Tillman

    Section Two: Developmental Trajectories

    Chapter Three: Children of Incarcerated Parents: Developmental Trajectories Among School-Age Children, Sophie Naudeau

    Chapter Four: Children of Promise, Kathy Boudin and Sarah Zeller-Berkman

    Section Three: Environmental Considerations

    Chapter Five: The Effects of Incarceration on Neighborhoods and Communities, He Len Chung and Daniel McFadden

    Chapter Six: Living Arrangements of Children of Incarcerated Parents: The Roles of Stability, Embeddedness, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity, Holly Foster

    Section Four: Parenting from Prison

    Chapter Seven: Building Partnerships to Strengthen Families: Intervention Programs and Recommendations, Kristina Toth and Kerry Kazura

    Chapter Eight: Strengthening Parent-Child Relationships:Visit Coaching with Children and their Incarcerated Parents, Marty Beyer, Randi Blumenthal-Guigui, and Tanya Krupat

    Section Five: Current and Future Directions

    Chapter Nine: Child Welfare Legislation and Policies: Foster Children with a Parent in Prison, Adela Beckerman

    Chapter Ten: Service Planning and Intervention Development for Children of Incarcerated Parents, Susan D. Phillips

    Chapter Eleven: The Challenge of Family Reunification, Yvette R. Harris, Vanessa A. Harris, James A. Graham, and Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter

    Chapter Twelve: Research and Intervention Issues for Moving Forward with Development in Children of Incarcerated Parents, Gloria J. Oliver Carpenter, James A. Graham, and Yvette R. Harris