Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Yang, Edith; Hendra, Richard
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Background: The high costs of implementing surveys are increasingly leading research teams to either cut back on surveys or to rely on administrative records. Yet no policy should be based on a single set of estimates, and every approach has its weaknesses. A mixture of approaches, each with its own biases, should provide the analyst with a better understanding of the underlying phenomenon. This claim is illustrated with a comparison of employment effect estimates of two conditional cash transfer programs in New York City using survey and administrative unemployment insurance (UI) data. Objectives: This article explores whether using administrative data and survey data produce different impact estimates and investigates the source of differential effects between data sources. Research design: The results of a survey nonresponse bias analysis and an analysis of characteristics of non-UI-covered job characteristics using data collected on 6,000 families who enrolled in either the Family Rewards or Work Rewards evaluation are...

    Background: The high costs of implementing surveys are increasingly leading research teams to either cut back on surveys or to rely on administrative records. Yet no policy should be based on a single set of estimates, and every approach has its weaknesses. A mixture of approaches, each with its own biases, should provide the analyst with a better understanding of the underlying phenomenon. This claim is illustrated with a comparison of employment effect estimates of two conditional cash transfer programs in New York City using survey and administrative unemployment insurance (UI) data. Objectives: This article explores whether using administrative data and survey data produce different impact estimates and investigates the source of differential effects between data sources. Research design: The results of a survey nonresponse bias analysis and an analysis of characteristics of non-UI-covered job characteristics using data collected on 6,000 families who enrolled in either the Family Rewards or Work Rewards evaluation are presented. Results: In both evaluations, survey data showed positive employment effects, while administrative data showed no statistically significant employment effects. Family Rewards increased employment mostly in non-UI-covered jobs, while the positive survey impact estimates in Work Rewards were partially due to survey nonresponse bias. Conclusions: Despite cost pressures leading researchers to collect and analyze only administrative records, the results suggest that survey and administrative records data both suffer from different kinds of sample attrition, and researchers may need to triangulate data sources to draw accurate conclusions about program effects. Developing more economical data collection practices is a major priority (Author abstract).

  • Individual Author: D’Onofrio, Christine; Levitan, Mark; Scheer, Daniel; Krampner, John; Virgin, Vicky
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    In December 2013, the New York City Charter was revised, requiring the Mayor to issue an annual report on poverty in the City. The Charter specifically requires that the report be based on the poverty measure developed by the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), in order to provide policy makers and the public a more informative alternative to the 50-year-old official U.S. poverty measure. This report is the first under the new mandate. It finds that the recession-related growth in the poverty rate, which began in 2008, has ended. In 2012, 21.4 percent of the New York City population (1,175,000 persons) was living below the CEO poverty line. The 2012 poverty rate was unchanged from the prior year. (author executive summary)

    In December 2013, the New York City Charter was revised, requiring the Mayor to issue an annual report on poverty in the City. The Charter specifically requires that the report be based on the poverty measure developed by the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), in order to provide policy makers and the public a more informative alternative to the 50-year-old official U.S. poverty measure. This report is the first under the new mandate. It finds that the recession-related growth in the poverty rate, which began in 2008, has ended. In 2012, 21.4 percent of the New York City population (1,175,000 persons) was living below the CEO poverty line. The 2012 poverty rate was unchanged from the prior year. (author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: da Costa Nunez, Ralph ; Erb-Downward, Jennifer ; Kannegaard, Josef ; Kaur, Navjot; Shaw-Amoah, Anna ; Greer, Kaitlin ; Redsecker, Kate ; Smiley, Omar; Bazerjian, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Despite a renewed focus on homelessness by the administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio, the number of families with children in need of emergency shelter continues to grow. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, more families with children entered shelter than at any point since FY 2010. The system is stretched beyond capacity by the over 12,000 families living in its Tier II facilities, hotels, and cluster sites nightly. These families include over 23,000 children whose lives and educations have been impacted by housing instability, many of whom are entering shelter for a second or third time, despite their young age.

    In order to further the conversation about the dynamics that drive family homelessness in New York City’s communities, On the Map: The Dynamics of Family Homelessness in New York City provides a geographic analysis of demographic patterns and newly-available data on family homelessness. On the Map is an easy-to-use resource for policymakers, budget analysts, service providers, and community leaders and organizations. (Author introduction) 

    Despite a renewed focus on homelessness by the administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio, the number of families with children in need of emergency shelter continues to grow. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, more families with children entered shelter than at any point since FY 2010. The system is stretched beyond capacity by the over 12,000 families living in its Tier II facilities, hotels, and cluster sites nightly. These families include over 23,000 children whose lives and educations have been impacted by housing instability, many of whom are entering shelter for a second or third time, despite their young age.

    In order to further the conversation about the dynamics that drive family homelessness in New York City’s communities, On the Map: The Dynamics of Family Homelessness in New York City provides a geographic analysis of demographic patterns and newly-available data on family homelessness. On the Map is an easy-to-use resource for policymakers, budget analysts, service providers, and community leaders and organizations. (Author introduction) 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2014 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations