Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Greenberg, David H.; Michalopoulos, Charles; Robin, Philip K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between 1964 and 1998. The results suggest that experimental and nonexperimental evaluations yield similar conclusions about the effectiveness of training programs, but that estimates of average effects for youth and possibly men might have been larger in experimental studies. The results also suggest that variation among nonexperimental estimates of program effects is similar to variation among experimental estimates for men and youth, but not for women (for whom it seems to be larger), although small sample sizes make the estimated differences somewhat imprecise for all three groups. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. (Author abstract). 

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between 1964 and 1998. The results suggest that experimental and nonexperimental evaluations yield similar conclusions about the effectiveness of training programs, but that estimates of average effects for youth and possibly men might have been larger in experimental studies. The results also suggest that variation among nonexperimental estimates of program effects is similar to variation among experimental estimates for men and youth, but not for women (for whom it seems to be larger), although small sample sizes make the estimated differences somewhat imprecise for all three groups. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. (Author abstract). 

  • Individual Author: Lopez del Puerto, Carla; Crowson, Adrienne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Training individuals who are at risk of unemployment/underemployment to increase their employability is a mission of many nonprofit agencies. These training programs, often supported by government funding, attempt to reduce these individuals’ reliance on government assistance. The purpose of this study is to obtain hard data and an in-depth understanding about the factors that contribute to the success of the Green Construction training program. The methodology used is a multimethod, multimeasure approach, which provides a reasonably robust triangulation of results. The findings indicate that the program is successful because it has good participant retention, knowledge gain, and placement rates. (author abstract)

    Training individuals who are at risk of unemployment/underemployment to increase their employability is a mission of many nonprofit agencies. These training programs, often supported by government funding, attempt to reduce these individuals’ reliance on government assistance. The purpose of this study is to obtain hard data and an in-depth understanding about the factors that contribute to the success of the Green Construction training program. The methodology used is a multimethod, multimeasure approach, which provides a reasonably robust triangulation of results. The findings indicate that the program is successful because it has good participant retention, knowledge gain, and placement rates. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hong, Phillip Young P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how service providers, clients, and graduates of a job training program define the term self-sufficiency (SS). This community-engaged, mixed method study qualitatively analyzes focus group data from each each group and quantitatively examines survey data obtained from participants of the program. Findings reveal that psychological transformation as a 'process' represents the emic definition of SS - psychological SS - but each dimension of the concept is reflected in varying degrees by group. Provider and participant views are vastly different from the outcome -driven policy and funder definitions. Implications for benchmarking psychological SS as an empowerment-based 'process' measure of job readiness in workforce development evaluation are discussed. (Author abstract)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how service providers, clients, and graduates of a job training program define the term self-sufficiency (SS). This community-engaged, mixed method study qualitatively analyzes focus group data from each each group and quantitatively examines survey data obtained from participants of the program. Findings reveal that psychological transformation as a 'process' represents the emic definition of SS - psychological SS - but each dimension of the concept is reflected in varying degrees by group. Provider and participant views are vastly different from the outcome -driven policy and funder definitions. Implications for benchmarking psychological SS as an empowerment-based 'process' measure of job readiness in workforce development evaluation are discussed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sandlin, Jennifer A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    This article discusses how two welfare education programs construct workforce success. Discourse about success in these programs falls into two basic camps: an individual-based self motivation perspective and an external, structural, socioeconomic perspective. Although the individualistic perspective adhered to by the programs came into conflict with structural problems faced by students, the programs ultimately chose to uphold a perspective that reinforces the American myth of success that has been prevalent in the United States since the 17th century. (author abstract)

    This article discusses how two welfare education programs construct workforce success. Discourse about success in these programs falls into two basic camps: an individual-based self motivation perspective and an external, structural, socioeconomic perspective. Although the individualistic perspective adhered to by the programs came into conflict with structural problems faced by students, the programs ultimately chose to uphold a perspective that reinforces the American myth of success that has been prevalent in the United States since the 17th century. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wrigley, Heide Spruck; Chen, Jing; White, Sheida; Soroui, Jaleh
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    This chapter examines the characteristics and performance of adult immigrants and adult English language learners on the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. These factors are related to key social outcomes such as involvement in the labor force, income, and welfare participation, and the data reported can be used in making decisions about program planning, as well as in implementation of adult ESOL programs and services. (author abstract)

    This chapter examines the characteristics and performance of adult immigrants and adult English language learners on the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. These factors are related to key social outcomes such as involvement in the labor force, income, and welfare participation, and the data reported can be used in making decisions about program planning, as well as in implementation of adult ESOL programs and services. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1990 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations