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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Marr, Matthew D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pistilli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Volume II is a qualitative study of success rates in rural areas. The purpose of this study is to explore Section 8 success rates and the factors that affect success rates in rural areas through in-depth qualitative research at five rural public housing authorities. The report is based on field work conducted between May and August, 2000. The rural study was not intended to feed into or re-validate the conclusions drawn from the larger quantitative study (Volume I report) regarding the relationships between household demographics, market tightness, and program success in metropolitan areas. Although these factors were considered, this study focused on identifying and examining the unique factors that affect voucher holders in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Volume II is a qualitative study of success rates in rural areas. The purpose of this study is to explore Section 8 success rates and the factors that affect success rates in rural areas through in-depth qualitative research at five rural public housing authorities. The report is based on field work conducted between May and August, 2000. The rural study was not intended to feed into or re-validate the conclusions drawn from the larger quantitative study (Volume I report) regarding the relationships between household demographics, market tightness, and program success in metropolitan areas. Although these factors were considered, this study focused on identifying and examining the unique factors that affect voucher holders in rural areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Finkel, Meryl; Buron, Larry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the national success rate for voucher holders in metropolitan areas and to explore the factors that affect chances for success (e.g., market tightness, voucher holder characteristics, and housing authority policies and procedures). This study is based on a sample of over 2,600 voucher holders who were issued vouchers in the spring and summer of 2000. The vouchers were issued by 48 Public PHAs who operated in metropolitan areas of the lower 48 states and had at least 800 voucher slots. (author abstract)

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the national success rate for voucher holders in metropolitan areas and to explore the factors that affect chances for success (e.g., market tightness, voucher holder characteristics, and housing authority policies and procedures). This study is based on a sample of over 2,600 voucher holders who were issued vouchers in the spring and summer of 2000. The vouchers were issued by 48 Public PHAs who operated in metropolitan areas of the lower 48 states and had at least 800 voucher slots. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Van Ryzin, Gregg G.; Kamber, Thomas
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    New York has devised a variety of policy approaches to improve the housing status of low-income households, including public housing, publicly subsidized private housing, rent vouchers, welfare shelter allowances, rent regulation, and tax incentives to landlords. Little systematic attention has been paid to how these various subtenures compare when judged by the housing outcomes they produce for low-income households in the city. Using data from the 1996 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey, this article compares New York City’s rental subtenures in terms of the following outcomes: housing quality, crowding, affordability, residential mobility/stability, and various indicators of neighborhood quality. Adjusting for differences in household and housing stock characteristics, we find that the tenant-based Section 8 program seems to produce the best set of overall outcomes for low-income renters in the city. (author abstract)

    New York has devised a variety of policy approaches to improve the housing status of low-income households, including public housing, publicly subsidized private housing, rent vouchers, welfare shelter allowances, rent regulation, and tax incentives to landlords. Little systematic attention has been paid to how these various subtenures compare when judged by the housing outcomes they produce for low-income households in the city. Using data from the 1996 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey, this article compares New York City’s rental subtenures in terms of the following outcomes: housing quality, crowding, affordability, residential mobility/stability, and various indicators of neighborhood quality. Adjusting for differences in household and housing stock characteristics, we find that the tenant-based Section 8 program seems to produce the best set of overall outcomes for low-income renters in the city. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Olsen, Edgar O.; Davis, Scott E.; Carrillo, Paul E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This paper uses administrative data on families that participated in HUD's Section 8 Housing Voucher Program between 1995 and 2002 combined with data from other sources to estimate the differences in attrition rates between families that differ with respect to characteristics of greatest interest for housing policy and the effects on attrition of changes in the program's main parameters. The most important results are that large decreases in the program's payment standard and increases in the tenant contribution to rent will have small effects on program attrition. These results suggest that the overwhelming majority of voucher recipients receive substantial benefits from program participation. The empirical analysis also indicates that the elderly and disabled status of the head of the family are by far the most important influences on the likelihood that the family will exit the tenant-based voucher program, with disabled families about 37 percent less likely to exit and elderly families around 23 percent less likely to exit each year than otherwise similar families....

    This paper uses administrative data on families that participated in HUD's Section 8 Housing Voucher Program between 1995 and 2002 combined with data from other sources to estimate the differences in attrition rates between families that differ with respect to characteristics of greatest interest for housing policy and the effects on attrition of changes in the program's main parameters. The most important results are that large decreases in the program's payment standard and increases in the tenant contribution to rent will have small effects on program attrition. These results suggest that the overwhelming majority of voucher recipients receive substantial benefits from program participation. The empirical analysis also indicates that the elderly and disabled status of the head of the family are by far the most important influences on the likelihood that the family will exit the tenant-based voucher program, with disabled families about 37 percent less likely to exit and elderly families around 23 percent less likely to exit each year than otherwise similar families. Differences in attrition rates based on other family characteristics are much smaller. (author abstract)

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