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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Alamprese, Judy
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    As the education and skills needed by adults to obtain employment and earn a living wage have increased, community colleges, local educational agencies, and community-based organizations providing adult basic education (ABE) are encouraging learners to enroll in postsecondary courses to enhance their opportunities. Transforming ABE programs to include helping learners make a successful transition to postsecondary education is an iterative process requiring new forms of instruction, enhanced services, and collaborative relationships with other agencies and organizations.

    Adults moving from ABE programs into higher education often face considerable challenges. Many need help strengthening their academic skills, as well as developing their study and time management skills. Many need assistance navigating enrollment and financial aid systems and other aspects of college life. In response to these challenges, ABE programs within and outside community colleges have begun more actively to assist adult learners in their transition to postsecondary education.

    This paper...

    As the education and skills needed by adults to obtain employment and earn a living wage have increased, community colleges, local educational agencies, and community-based organizations providing adult basic education (ABE) are encouraging learners to enroll in postsecondary courses to enhance their opportunities. Transforming ABE programs to include helping learners make a successful transition to postsecondary education is an iterative process requiring new forms of instruction, enhanced services, and collaborative relationships with other agencies and organizations.

    Adults moving from ABE programs into higher education often face considerable challenges. Many need help strengthening their academic skills, as well as developing their study and time management skills. Many need assistance navigating enrollment and financial aid systems and other aspects of college life. In response to these challenges, ABE programs within and outside community colleges have begun more actively to assist adult learners in their transition to postsecondary education.

    This paper discusses the challenges ABE programs must address in developing and implementing transition services, provides examples of emerging efforts, and discusses the implications of this transformation for policy and practice. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Eyster, Lauren; Derrick-Mills, Teresa; Trutko, John; Compton, Jessica F.; Stanczyk, Alexandra; Nightingale, Demetra Smith
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Community and technical colleges are important training providers for the nation, uniquely positioned to develop a skilled regional workforce, but may lack the capacity to respond to the needs of industry. The Community-Based Job Training Grant program, administered by the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, was intended to address a critical capacity shortage at community and technical colleges to train workers for high-growth occupations to help strengthen an industry's regional competitiveness. The Urban Institute's implementation evaluation provides a comprehensive picture of the grants and highlights innovations, successes and challenges, and trends and patterns across the grants. (Author abstract)

      

     

    Community and technical colleges are important training providers for the nation, uniquely positioned to develop a skilled regional workforce, but may lack the capacity to respond to the needs of industry. The Community-Based Job Training Grant program, administered by the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, was intended to address a critical capacity shortage at community and technical colleges to train workers for high-growth occupations to help strengthen an industry's regional competitiveness. The Urban Institute's implementation evaluation provides a comprehensive picture of the grants and highlights innovations, successes and challenges, and trends and patterns across the grants. (Author abstract)

      

     

  • Individual Author: Zafft, Cynthia; Kallenbach, Silja; Spohn, Jessica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    While the majority of adults who take the General Educational Development (GED) test do so in order to continue their education, few go on to enter postsecondary education (Tyler, 2001). Yet, these same adults stand to make substantial economic and personal gains when they use their adult secondary credential to move from the ranks of high school dropout to postsecondary graduate, with the possibility of going from low-wage jobs to careers with a livable wage and benefits. Unlike transition services for high school graduates, which are well-established, the transformation of adult basic education (ABE) programs to include transition services for adults is an emerging area of concern for the field of adult education (Office of Vocational and Adult Education, 2004). Identifying adult education models that help adult learners avoid cycles of remediation at the beginning of their college careers is more likely to produce students who can persist and obtain a postsecondary education credential. In the first five years of adult transition work done by staff at the New England Literacy...

    While the majority of adults who take the General Educational Development (GED) test do so in order to continue their education, few go on to enter postsecondary education (Tyler, 2001). Yet, these same adults stand to make substantial economic and personal gains when they use their adult secondary credential to move from the ranks of high school dropout to postsecondary graduate, with the possibility of going from low-wage jobs to careers with a livable wage and benefits. Unlike transition services for high school graduates, which are well-established, the transformation of adult basic education (ABE) programs to include transition services for adults is an emerging area of concern for the field of adult education (Office of Vocational and Adult Education, 2004). Identifying adult education models that help adult learners avoid cycles of remediation at the beginning of their college careers is more likely to produce students who can persist and obtain a postsecondary education credential. In the first five years of adult transition work done by staff at the New England Literacy Resource Center (NELRC) at World Education, Inc., the team noticed distinct models emerging in the field. To capture and categorize these models, NELRC surveyed adult education centers with transition components from around the United States, guided by the question: Do ABE-to-college transition programs fall into discrete models and, if so, what are the key features of these models? Through the development of program snapshots and four state profiles, the team discovered commonalities, allowing for an extension of an earlier typology of adult transition programs (Alamprese, 2004) now to include five models: Advising, GED-Plus, ESOL, Career Pathways, and College Preparatory. In addition, analysis of the aggregated data produced a series of themes and recommendations that other states contemplating adult transition services might find helpful. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jacobs, James; Tolbert-Bynum, Pamela
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2008

    This paper explores some of the barriers adult basic education students face in obtaining postsecondary credentials. We locate community college-based adult education within the broader context of ABE and examine the outcomes of these programs. We then highlight the various challenges faced by community college-based ABE programs. Many of these challenges have their roots in the structure of the colleges and ABE within various states, and the policy landscape under which ABE and community colleges coexist.

    We offer concrete suggestions to policymakers that can be used to improve the outcomes for ABE students by describing the lessons learned from three state-level policy initiatives and then providing specific suggestions for federal support of similar efforts. Finally, we conclude with recommends for an enhanced federal role in ensuring more significant ABE outcomes to benefit both students and the nation's economy. (author abstract)

    This paper explores some of the barriers adult basic education students face in obtaining postsecondary credentials. We locate community college-based adult education within the broader context of ABE and examine the outcomes of these programs. We then highlight the various challenges faced by community college-based ABE programs. Many of these challenges have their roots in the structure of the colleges and ABE within various states, and the policy landscape under which ABE and community colleges coexist.

    We offer concrete suggestions to policymakers that can be used to improve the outcomes for ABE students by describing the lessons learned from three state-level policy initiatives and then providing specific suggestions for federal support of similar efforts. Finally, we conclude with recommends for an enhanced federal role in ensuring more significant ABE outcomes to benefit both students and the nation's economy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schirm, Allen; Stuart, Elizabeth; McKie, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    From 1995 to 2001, the U.S. Department of Labor and the Ford Foundation ran a demonstration of the Quantum Opportunity Program (QOP), mainly an after-school program that also began offering intensive and comprehensive services to at-risk youth when they entered ninth grade. QOP’s goals were to increase rates of high school graduation and enrollment in postsecondary education or training; secondary goals included improving high school grades and achievement test scores and reducing risky behaviors, such as substance abuse, crime, and teen parenting. This final report from Mathematica's random assignment evaluation presents impacts on outcomes measured when most sample members were 22 to 25 years old. Overall, QOP did not achieve its primary or secondary objectives, but the lack of overall impacts masks some suggestive evidence of promising effects for some sites and subgroups. (author abstract)

    From 1995 to 2001, the U.S. Department of Labor and the Ford Foundation ran a demonstration of the Quantum Opportunity Program (QOP), mainly an after-school program that also began offering intensive and comprehensive services to at-risk youth when they entered ninth grade. QOP’s goals were to increase rates of high school graduation and enrollment in postsecondary education or training; secondary goals included improving high school grades and achievement test scores and reducing risky behaviors, such as substance abuse, crime, and teen parenting. This final report from Mathematica's random assignment evaluation presents impacts on outcomes measured when most sample members were 22 to 25 years old. Overall, QOP did not achieve its primary or secondary objectives, but the lack of overall impacts masks some suggestive evidence of promising effects for some sites and subgroups. (author abstract)

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