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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Criden, Madelaine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Access to transportation by low-income individuals and families has become limited as the majority of low-income households reside in rural areas and central cities, while basic amenities are increasingly located in the suburbs. With new jobs emerging further and further away from central cities, many low-income workers often have difficulty accessing jobs, training and other services such as childcare because of inadequate transportation. In addition, many minimum wage jobs require working evening or weekend hours, but traditional transportation systems often do not serve their routes during these times. Access to affordable transportation for low-income workers, elderly rural residents, and children makes the trip to work, school, and medical appointments possible. It fosters self-sustainability, promotes independence, and permits spending on other household essentials. Given these benefits, this issue brief will demonstrate that rural public transportation is indispensable. (author abstract)

    Access to transportation by low-income individuals and families has become limited as the majority of low-income households reside in rural areas and central cities, while basic amenities are increasingly located in the suburbs. With new jobs emerging further and further away from central cities, many low-income workers often have difficulty accessing jobs, training and other services such as childcare because of inadequate transportation. In addition, many minimum wage jobs require working evening or weekend hours, but traditional transportation systems often do not serve their routes during these times. Access to affordable transportation for low-income workers, elderly rural residents, and children makes the trip to work, school, and medical appointments possible. It fosters self-sustainability, promotes independence, and permits spending on other household essentials. Given these benefits, this issue brief will demonstrate that rural public transportation is indispensable. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Heilmann, Kilian
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2014

    The spatial mismatch hypothesis of Kain explains urban poverty with the inability of the poor to reach fast-growing job opportunities in the suburbs, the so called reverse commuting. Public transport provision might be an effective tool to alleviate spatial mismatch, especially if it provides access to suburbs that were formerly only reachable by car. I propose to study the effect of light rail extension in the city of Dallas on the poor using both Census and geocoded individual-level data. (author abstract) 

    The spatial mismatch hypothesis of Kain explains urban poverty with the inability of the poor to reach fast-growing job opportunities in the suburbs, the so called reverse commuting. Public transport provision might be an effective tool to alleviate spatial mismatch, especially if it provides access to suburbs that were formerly only reachable by car. I propose to study the effect of light rail extension in the city of Dallas on the poor using both Census and geocoded individual-level data. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Wise, David
    Year: 2012

    Millions of Americans are unable to provide their own transportation or have difficulty accessing public transportation. Such transportation-disadvantaged individuals may include those who are elderly, have disabilities, or have low incomes. The Departments of Education, Health and Human Services (HHS), Labor (DOL), Transportation (DOT), Veterans Affairs (VA), and other federal agencies may provide funds to state and local entities to help these individuals access human service programs. As requested, GAO examined (1) federal programs that may fund transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged; (2) federal coordination efforts undertaken since 2003; and (3) coordination at the state and local levels. GAO analyzed information from the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance; interviewed federal officials; and interviewed state and local officials in five states, chosen based on a variety of characteristics, including geographic diversity. (author abstract)

    Millions of Americans are unable to provide their own transportation or have difficulty accessing public transportation. Such transportation-disadvantaged individuals may include those who are elderly, have disabilities, or have low incomes. The Departments of Education, Health and Human Services (HHS), Labor (DOL), Transportation (DOT), Veterans Affairs (VA), and other federal agencies may provide funds to state and local entities to help these individuals access human service programs. As requested, GAO examined (1) federal programs that may fund transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged; (2) federal coordination efforts undertaken since 2003; and (3) coordination at the state and local levels. GAO analyzed information from the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance; interviewed federal officials; and interviewed state and local officials in five states, chosen based on a variety of characteristics, including geographic diversity. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wise, David
    Year: 2013

    Millions of Americans are unable to provide their own transportation or have difficulty accessing public transportation. Such transportation-disadvantaged populations may include those who are elderly, have disabilities, or have low incomes. Older adults represent the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population, and access to transportation is critical to helping individuals remain independent as they age.

    This statement addresses (1) the federal programs that provide funding for transportation services for the transportation-disadvantaged populations, including older adults, and (2) the types of challenges faced in providing services to transportation-disadvantaged populations. This statement is based on GAO's body of work in this area from 2004 through 2012. (author abstract)

     

    Millions of Americans are unable to provide their own transportation or have difficulty accessing public transportation. Such transportation-disadvantaged populations may include those who are elderly, have disabilities, or have low incomes. Older adults represent the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population, and access to transportation is critical to helping individuals remain independent as they age.

    This statement addresses (1) the federal programs that provide funding for transportation services for the transportation-disadvantaged populations, including older adults, and (2) the types of challenges faced in providing services to transportation-disadvantaged populations. This statement is based on GAO's body of work in this area from 2004 through 2012. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Salisbury, Sarah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

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