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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Author: Rohacek, Monica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Idaho's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, Idaho implemented policy and process improvements, including improving the redetermination process by aligning redetermination dates and further implementing the universal workforce case management approach. The state also implemented child care assistance program reforms including aligning policy with other work support programs and simplifying eligibility requirements. (author abstract)

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Idaho's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, Idaho implemented policy and process improvements, including improving the redetermination process by aligning redetermination dates and further implementing the universal workforce case management approach. The state also implemented child care assistance program reforms including aligning policy with other work support programs and simplifying eligibility requirements. (author abstract)

  • Author: Sawhill, Isabel V. ; Haskins, Ron
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Although the sweeping welfare reform law of 1996 has received widespread attention in the media and among policymakers, the development of the nation’s work support system, which is a vital complement to the 1996 reforms, has received far less attention. The work support system is a series of programs that provide benefits to poor and low-income working families. In popular parlance, they are programs that “make work pay.” The most important of these programs are the minimum wage, the Earned Income Tax Credit, the child tax credit, income supplement programs conducted by states, food stamps, health insurance, child support enforcement, and child care. A recent study by the Congressional Budget Office showed that numerous expansions of these programs since the mid-1980s have increased by a factor of more than eight the value of federal work support benefits now being paid to working families. Given the important role these programs play in maintaining work incentives, supplementing earned income so working families can provide a minimum living standard for their children, and...

    Although the sweeping welfare reform law of 1996 has received widespread attention in the media and among policymakers, the development of the nation’s work support system, which is a vital complement to the 1996 reforms, has received far less attention. The work support system is a series of programs that provide benefits to poor and low-income working families. In popular parlance, they are programs that “make work pay.” The most important of these programs are the minimum wage, the Earned Income Tax Credit, the child tax credit, income supplement programs conducted by states, food stamps, health insurance, child support enforcement, and child care. A recent study by the Congressional Budget Office showed that numerous expansions of these programs since the mid-1980s have increased by a factor of more than eight the value of federal work support benefits now being paid to working families. Given the important role these programs play in maintaining work incentives, supplementing earned income so working families can provide a minimum living standard for their children, and helping families when unemployment hits, the maintenance and even expansion of these programs will be a major part of this year’s welfare reauthorization debate in Congress. In this brief, we provide an overview of work support programs and examine the pros and cons of proposals to expand them. (author abstract)

  • Author: Hahn, Heather; Golden, Olivia; Compton, Jessica F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Illinois' accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, the state identified how and where to best align programs to simplify eligibility processes, including an assessment of child care assistance policies and development of a key performance measures report for local office managers. The state designed and piloted a new task-based model to improve benefit field office efficiency. (author abstract)

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Illinois' accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, the state identified how and where to best align programs to simplify eligibility processes, including an assessment of child care assistance policies and development of a key performance measures report for local office managers. The state designed and piloted a new task-based model to improve benefit field office efficiency. (author abstract)

  • Author: Loprest, Pamela J.; Giesen, Lindsay
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Colorado's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative’s first year. In this planning year, Colorado improved collaboration between the state human services and health agencies, and between the state and counties. Improved collaboration led to a shortened joint benefit application, quicker processing of SNAP applications and recertifications, cohesive plans for implementing health reform, and supplemental budget funds to improve the statewide automated benefits system. (author abstract)

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Colorado's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative’s first year. In this planning year, Colorado improved collaboration between the state human services and health agencies, and between the state and counties. Improved collaboration led to a shortened joint benefit application, quicker processing of SNAP applications and recertifications, cohesive plans for implementing health reform, and supplemental budget funds to improve the statewide automated benefits system. (author abstract)

  • Author: Annie E. Casey Foundation
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2005

    Work supports are designed to help families close the gap between low earnings and basic expenses, yet these benefits are often invisible or inaccessible to those most in need. In two pages, the Annie E. Casey Foundation details the depths of this disconnect and shares how it is promoting the use of work supports to help households achieve greater financial stability. It is one fact sheet in a 10-part series devoted to fostering the economic empowerment of families across America. (author abstract)

    Work supports are designed to help families close the gap between low earnings and basic expenses, yet these benefits are often invisible or inaccessible to those most in need. In two pages, the Annie E. Casey Foundation details the depths of this disconnect and shares how it is promoting the use of work supports to help households achieve greater financial stability. It is one fact sheet in a 10-part series devoted to fostering the economic empowerment of families across America. (author abstract)

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