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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Author: Ratliff, Pamela P.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high...

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high degree of negative involvement. Results also revealed that there was no difference in the level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy and procedures for fathers who were in compliance with child support orders and those who were not in compliance. Ultimately, the study confirmed that educating fathers about child support policy and procedures is a strategy that should be explored further for its usefulness in informing non-custodial, low-income fathers' decision making regarding legal and financial obligations to their children. (author abstract)

  • Author: Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Saunders, Correne; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    Large arrears balances can have negative effects on states, non-custodial parents, and ultimately the children who are due the support. For these reasons, policy makers and program managers have begun to think creatively about potential methods to reduce current arrears balances and prevent the accumulation of additional arrears. One emerging concern has been the build-up of arrears when a non-custodial parent is incarcerated. Some argue that these balances are uncollectible and that they may, in fact, reduce the possibility of parents paying any support and being involved in their children’s lives once they are released from prison. Thus, states are considering a range of policy options for dealing with incarcerated obligors, from suspending or reducing the current support order while the individual is imprisoned to providing comprehensive employment and reintegration services for those who are released from prison.

    States will have to weigh a variety of competing and often controversial factors in choosing among the various policy and program options for addressing the...

    Large arrears balances can have negative effects on states, non-custodial parents, and ultimately the children who are due the support. For these reasons, policy makers and program managers have begun to think creatively about potential methods to reduce current arrears balances and prevent the accumulation of additional arrears. One emerging concern has been the build-up of arrears when a non-custodial parent is incarcerated. Some argue that these balances are uncollectible and that they may, in fact, reduce the possibility of parents paying any support and being involved in their children’s lives once they are released from prison. Thus, states are considering a range of policy options for dealing with incarcerated obligors, from suspending or reducing the current support order while the individual is imprisoned to providing comprehensive employment and reintegration services for those who are released from prison.

    States will have to weigh a variety of competing and often controversial factors in choosing among the various policy and program options for addressing the arrears problem for this portion of their child support caseload. An important place of beginning is to understand the extent of the problem. The present study does just that for Maryland by combining administrative data from the Division of Corrections and the Child Support Enforcement Administration to explore the intersection of child support and incarceration in our state. (author abstract)

  • Author: Stirling, Kate; Aldrich, Thomas
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Despite their increasing numbers, divorced families with a noncustodial mother and a custodial father have received scant research attention. Our study attempts to provide some initial insight into the economic status of these families. Examining the child support obligation, we find that noncustodial mothers face a much smaller award than noncustodial fathers, both in terms of the absolute dollar amount of the award and as a percentage of the obligor's income. This potential inequity, however, is offset by the fact that—despite the relatively lower child support obligation—noncustodial mothers experience a larger decline in their standard of living than do custodial fathers and their children. Thus although previous research has found that custodial mothers bear the brunt of familial dissolution, this conclusion does not apply to custodial fathers. Rather, mothers—regardless of custodial status—fare more poorly than fathers. (Author abstract)

    Despite their increasing numbers, divorced families with a noncustodial mother and a custodial father have received scant research attention. Our study attempts to provide some initial insight into the economic status of these families. Examining the child support obligation, we find that noncustodial mothers face a much smaller award than noncustodial fathers, both in terms of the absolute dollar amount of the award and as a percentage of the obligor's income. This potential inequity, however, is offset by the fact that—despite the relatively lower child support obligation—noncustodial mothers experience a larger decline in their standard of living than do custodial fathers and their children. Thus although previous research has found that custodial mothers bear the brunt of familial dissolution, this conclusion does not apply to custodial fathers. Rather, mothers—regardless of custodial status—fare more poorly than fathers. (Author abstract)

  • Author: Bartfeld, Judi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This article provides national estimates of the current and potential impact of private child support transfers on the economic well-being of custodial and noncustodial families following marital dissolution. Mothers and children fare dramatically worse than fathers after marital dissolution; these differences, however, would be much more pronounced in the absence of private child support. Simulations of four existing child support guidelines show that substantial increases in economic well-being among mother-custody families are possible within the structure of the existing child support system, with minimal impact on poverty among nonresident fathers. Under all of these guidelines, however, custodial-mother families would continue to fare substantially worse than nonresident fathers. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a discussion paper published by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

    This article provides national estimates of the current and potential impact of private child support transfers on the economic well-being of custodial and noncustodial families following marital dissolution. Mothers and children fare dramatically worse than fathers after marital dissolution; these differences, however, would be much more pronounced in the absence of private child support. Simulations of four existing child support guidelines show that substantial increases in economic well-being among mother-custody families are possible within the structure of the existing child support system, with minimal impact on poverty among nonresident fathers. Under all of these guidelines, however, custodial-mother families would continue to fare substantially worse than nonresident fathers. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a discussion paper published by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

  • Author: Brien, Michael J.; Willis, Robert J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    Public interest in promoting the self-sufficiency of families that depend on welfare concerns the ability of fathers, as well as mothers, to support their children through employment. Many welfare recipients are never-married women, and their children seldom receive child support payments. This article estimates the financial resources that go untapped when child support is not collected from the men who father children who later receive AFDC benefits. While these men may earn little at the time the child is born, their incomes are likely to escalate over time. The child support payments they would make over the child's first 18 years equal almost half of the welfare benefit received by the mother and child. Based on these probable long-term earnings, the authors urge policymakers to invest in efforts to establish paternity and collect child support. (author abstract)

    Public interest in promoting the self-sufficiency of families that depend on welfare concerns the ability of fathers, as well as mothers, to support their children through employment. Many welfare recipients are never-married women, and their children seldom receive child support payments. This article estimates the financial resources that go untapped when child support is not collected from the men who father children who later receive AFDC benefits. While these men may earn little at the time the child is born, their incomes are likely to escalate over time. The child support payments they would make over the child's first 18 years equal almost half of the welfare benefit received by the mother and child. Based on these probable long-term earnings, the authors urge policymakers to invest in efforts to establish paternity and collect child support. (author abstract)

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