Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ozawa, Martha N.; Yoon, Hong-Sik
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), a part of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, changed the philosophical ground and rules and regulations that apply to low-income families with children who seek federal income support. TANF recipients have less flexibility in charting their life courses than AFDC recipients had. This article presents the findings of a study that investigated how TANF leavers, in comparison with AFDC leavers, fared economically after they left the cash assistance rolls. The major finding is that the income status of AFDC leavers increased considerably, but that of TANF leavers declined. The authors argue that TANF leavers fared less well economically because their decisions about whether to work, to engage in work-related activities, and to leave cash assistance rolls were under stricter control. The data sources for this study were the 1993 and 1996 Survey of Income and Program Participation. (author abstract)

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), a part of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, changed the philosophical ground and rules and regulations that apply to low-income families with children who seek federal income support. TANF recipients have less flexibility in charting their life courses than AFDC recipients had. This article presents the findings of a study that investigated how TANF leavers, in comparison with AFDC leavers, fared economically after they left the cash assistance rolls. The major finding is that the income status of AFDC leavers increased considerably, but that of TANF leavers declined. The authors argue that TANF leavers fared less well economically because their decisions about whether to work, to engage in work-related activities, and to leave cash assistance rolls were under stricter control. The data sources for this study were the 1993 and 1996 Survey of Income and Program Participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nagle, Gloria
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    This article is based on survey data collected in Massachusetts between October 1999 and March 2000 to determine the nature, scope, and distribution of housing assistance among families leaving welfare and compare characteristics and postexit outcomes of housing-assisted and housing-unassisted welfare leavers. The author hypothesizes that housing-assisted welfare leavers have more characteristics associated with being more disadvantaged, have longer welfare spells, and have more modest postexit outcomes than unassisted welfare leavers. The analysis was conducted in Massachusetts because of the state’s high proportion of housing-assisted welfare families. (Author abstract)

    This article is based on survey data collected in Massachusetts between October 1999 and March 2000 to determine the nature, scope, and distribution of housing assistance among families leaving welfare and compare characteristics and postexit outcomes of housing-assisted and housing-unassisted welfare leavers. The author hypothesizes that housing-assisted welfare leavers have more characteristics associated with being more disadvantaged, have longer welfare spells, and have more modest postexit outcomes than unassisted welfare leavers. The analysis was conducted in Massachusetts because of the state’s high proportion of housing-assisted welfare families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Acs, Gregory; Loprest, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The dramatic decline in welfare caseloads in the 1990s suggested that welfare reform was achieving one of its major goals: reducing dependency. It also raised questions among policymakers, program administrators, advocates, and the public as to whether the characteristics of the caseload were changing, whether families that left welfare were better off than when they were on welfare, and whether former recipients were making progress in the labor market. The purpose of this report is to summarize what we know about these issues for current TANF recipients and former recipients (“leavers”)1 from existing literature and to update our knowledge with new analysis using more recent data. The key questions addressed in the report are: 1.) How do the characteristics of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload compare with the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)/TANF caseload characteristics 5 and 10 years ago?2 In particular, is the caseload more or less disadvantaged than in the past, especially with respect to their employability? 2.) What are the...

    The dramatic decline in welfare caseloads in the 1990s suggested that welfare reform was achieving one of its major goals: reducing dependency. It also raised questions among policymakers, program administrators, advocates, and the public as to whether the characteristics of the caseload were changing, whether families that left welfare were better off than when they were on welfare, and whether former recipients were making progress in the labor market. The purpose of this report is to summarize what we know about these issues for current TANF recipients and former recipients (“leavers”)1 from existing literature and to update our knowledge with new analysis using more recent data. The key questions addressed in the report are: 1.) How do the characteristics of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload compare with the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)/TANF caseload characteristics 5 and 10 years ago?2 In particular, is the caseload more or less disadvantaged than in the past, especially with respect to their employability? 2.) What are the characteristics and outcomes for families that recently left the TANF rolls compared with families on TANF, and compared with families that left the TANF rolls 5 and 10 years ago? Have TANF leavers become more or less disadvantaged? Are families better off after leaving TANF than when they were on the welfare rolls? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mancuso, David C.; Lieberman, Charles J.; Lindler, Vanessa L.; Moses, Anne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    This article describes the results of a study conducted in San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties, California, to learn more about the circumstances of families leaving the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and about the effects of housing assistance on post-TANF outcomes. The study used a combination of administrative data from state and county databases as well as survey data collected through interviews occurring 6, 12, and 18 months after TANF exit. Three groups of families with children were tracked: families that left TANF in the fourth quarter of 1998 and were receiving housing assistance in January 1999 (housing-assisted leavers); families that left TANF in the fourth quarter of 1998 and were not receiving housing assistance in January 1999 (non-housing-assisted leavers); and other families that were receiving housing assistance in January 1999 and were either current or former TANF recipients or had never received TANF (housing-assisted others).

    The results show that housing-assisted leavers were more likely than non-housing-assisted...

    This article describes the results of a study conducted in San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties, California, to learn more about the circumstances of families leaving the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and about the effects of housing assistance on post-TANF outcomes. The study used a combination of administrative data from state and county databases as well as survey data collected through interviews occurring 6, 12, and 18 months after TANF exit. Three groups of families with children were tracked: families that left TANF in the fourth quarter of 1998 and were receiving housing assistance in January 1999 (housing-assisted leavers); families that left TANF in the fourth quarter of 1998 and were not receiving housing assistance in January 1999 (non-housing-assisted leavers); and other families that were receiving housing assistance in January 1999 and were either current or former TANF recipients or had never received TANF (housing-assisted others).

    The results show that housing-assisted leavers were more likely than non-housing-assisted leavers to belong to a minority racial/ethnic group, have more extensive welfare histories, be older, have more and older children in the household, have higher rates of welfare recidivism 18 months after leaving TANF, and have lower wages and total household incomes. Housing-assisted leavers were also much more likely than non-housing-assisted leavers to be working full time 18 months after leaving TANF. Non-housing-assisted leavers were more likely than housing-assisted leavers to live in extended-family or multifamily households and multiple-adult households. They were also more likely to be living in substandard or crowded housing 12 months after leaving TANF.

    Although the provision of housing assistance was associated with reduced crowding and, to a lesser extent, reduced TANF recidivism, it was not associated with a reduced risk of poor outcomes over a broader range of outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Born, Catherine E.; Tracy, Kirk
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    At the request of the Joint Oversight Committee on Welfare Reform, today’s paper presents results from additional analyses of Life After Welfare data for the most recent leavers - the nearly 1000 families whose Maryland welfare cases closed between April 2002 and March 2003. Specifically, the paper presents findings about leavers in the two subdivisions (Baltimore City and Prince George’s County) with the largest caseloads and compares results to findings for the balance of the state (i.e., the other 22 counties combined).

    This is an important analysis to undertake and consider because, going forward, Maryland’s ability to achieve welfare reform goals is heavily dependent on actions taken and results achieved in Baltimore City and Prince George’s County. Together these two jurisdictions account for more than two-thirds (69%) of the statewide cash assistance caseload. In contrast, the state’s other 22 jurisdictions, combined, account for not quite one-third (31%) of the statewide total. (author abstract)

    At the request of the Joint Oversight Committee on Welfare Reform, today’s paper presents results from additional analyses of Life After Welfare data for the most recent leavers - the nearly 1000 families whose Maryland welfare cases closed between April 2002 and March 2003. Specifically, the paper presents findings about leavers in the two subdivisions (Baltimore City and Prince George’s County) with the largest caseloads and compares results to findings for the balance of the state (i.e., the other 22 counties combined).

    This is an important analysis to undertake and consider because, going forward, Maryland’s ability to achieve welfare reform goals is heavily dependent on actions taken and results achieved in Baltimore City and Prince George’s County. Together these two jurisdictions account for more than two-thirds (69%) of the statewide cash assistance caseload. In contrast, the state’s other 22 jurisdictions, combined, account for not quite one-third (31%) of the statewide total. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1995 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations