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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Clum, Kim; McDaniel, Marla; Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Timmerman, Larry; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bird, Kisha; Amaechi, Andrea; West Bey, Nia; Taliaferro, Wayne
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    Youth of color are full of promise; they are courageous, intelligent, creative, curious, bold, and resilient. An investment strategy placing them at the center and addressing the structural barriers that keep them locked out of social, emotional, and economic prosperity because of their race/ethnicity, gender, and/or zip code is both fiscally responsible and socially responsible. Leaders at all levels and in all sectors--from law enforcement to education and in the public and private sectors--must value the lives of young men and women of color and acknowledge implicit biases that promulgate negative stereotypes. Public policy reforms to expand youth justice and diversion strategies should not be based on a single program model, rather public policy should build the community capacity to create and/or strengthen a comprehensive delivery system for youth, whereby justice, workforce, education, mental health, and community-based partners are indispensable. This paper represents a first step towards a more powerfully linked agenda for justice reform. In particular, the paper...

    Youth of color are full of promise; they are courageous, intelligent, creative, curious, bold, and resilient. An investment strategy placing them at the center and addressing the structural barriers that keep them locked out of social, emotional, and economic prosperity because of their race/ethnicity, gender, and/or zip code is both fiscally responsible and socially responsible. Leaders at all levels and in all sectors--from law enforcement to education and in the public and private sectors--must value the lives of young men and women of color and acknowledge implicit biases that promulgate negative stereotypes. Public policy reforms to expand youth justice and diversion strategies should not be based on a single program model, rather public policy should build the community capacity to create and/or strengthen a comprehensive delivery system for youth, whereby justice, workforce, education, mental health, and community-based partners are indispensable. This paper represents a first step towards a more powerfully linked agenda for justice reform. In particular, the paper proposes policy strategies that envision work and educational opportunities, along with health and mental health supports, as part of the formula needed to dismantle structural barriers that push youth of color out of school and into detention and incarceration; prevent them from obtaining employment and entering careers with family sustaining wages; and lock them perpetually out of opportunity. The goal of this paper is to provide a framework for recommendations to expand youth justice reform and diversion strategies based on these core ideas of education and employment pathways along with health and mental health supports that can prevent youth of color from entering the juvenile or criminal justice system in the first place, and better support them during and after detention, placement, and/or incarceration. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Gutierrez, Florencia; Speer, Laura; Boughamer, Beau; Fox, Ryan; Hamilton, Lisa; Hodgins, John; Laracy, Michael; West, Norris; Cauthen, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Westat
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    What are the social service needs of low-income urban American Indians and to what extent to do they access ACF services and supports? This report presents the results of an exploratory study to better understand Urban Indians' interactions with ACF programs and services. Data were obtained via in-depth interviews with directors of Urban Indian Centers (UICs) from around the country and a set of employees from local government social service agencies. Interviewees were asked to identify the range of social service needs of the population; barriers to accessing ACF services, what role the UICs play in meeting urban American Indians’ needs, and any promising or effective practices that they believed would improve services to the urban Indian population. (author abstract)

    What are the social service needs of low-income urban American Indians and to what extent to do they access ACF services and supports? This report presents the results of an exploratory study to better understand Urban Indians' interactions with ACF programs and services. Data were obtained via in-depth interviews with directors of Urban Indian Centers (UICs) from around the country and a set of employees from local government social service agencies. Interviewees were asked to identify the range of social service needs of the population; barriers to accessing ACF services, what role the UICs play in meeting urban American Indians’ needs, and any promising or effective practices that they believed would improve services to the urban Indian population. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Langwell, Kathryn; Helba, Cynthia; Love, Craig
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This report identifies gaps in American Indians, Alaska Natives, and other Native Americans data on health and well-being, strategies for improving AI/AN/NA data availability and quality, and some current initiatives underway within DHHS and other federal agencies that are intended to improve these data.

    The findings in this report are drawn from a review of the literature and available reports on AI/AN/NA data, analysis of detailed profiles of 67 data sources that were included in the Data Catalog on AI/AN/NA Health and Well-being, an earlier product of this study, and interviews with 13 knowledgeable individuals who provided information on current initiatives underway and additional strategies that could improve the availability and quality of data on AI/AN/NA health and well-being. In developing the data catalog, we identified a set of policy areas relevant to AI/AN/NA health and well-being, including child well-being, economic well-being, educational achievement and opportunities, elder well-being, family well-being, housing indicators, justice system indicators,...

    This report identifies gaps in American Indians, Alaska Natives, and other Native Americans data on health and well-being, strategies for improving AI/AN/NA data availability and quality, and some current initiatives underway within DHHS and other federal agencies that are intended to improve these data.

    The findings in this report are drawn from a review of the literature and available reports on AI/AN/NA data, analysis of detailed profiles of 67 data sources that were included in the Data Catalog on AI/AN/NA Health and Well-being, an earlier product of this study, and interviews with 13 knowledgeable individuals who provided information on current initiatives underway and additional strategies that could improve the availability and quality of data on AI/AN/NA health and well-being. In developing the data catalog, we identified a set of policy areas relevant to AI/AN/NA health and well-being, including child well-being, economic well-being, educational achievement and opportunities, elder well-being, family well-being, housing indicators, justice system indicators, military/veterans' issues, and transportation quality and availability. The data catalog analysis focuses on the availability of data sets to address each of the identified policy areas. (author abstract)

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