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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Clum, Kim; McDaniel, Marla; Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Timmerman, Larry; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance
    Year: 2016

    The report provides data through Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and presents information regarding TANF expenditures and caseloads, work participation and earnings, the characteristics and financial circumstances of TANF recipients, TANF performance measures, interactions between TANF and child support, as well as specific provisions of state TANF programs.  Key highlights from the TANF Eleventh Report to Congress include:

    • In FY 2013, states received federal TANF block grants and supplemental grants totaling $16.5 billion.  In addition, 19 qualifying states received a combined total of about $529 million in FY 2013 contingency funds.
    • Combined federal TANF and state Maintenance-of-Effort (MOE) expenditures totaled $31.6 billion in FY 2013.  On a national level, states spent 28 percent of this total on basic assistance (largely cash aid to meet a family’s ongoing basic needs), 16 percent on child care, and 6 percent on work-related activities.
    • In FY 2013, a monthly average of 1.75 million families, with 4.10 million recipients, received TANF assistance funded...

    The report provides data through Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and presents information regarding TANF expenditures and caseloads, work participation and earnings, the characteristics and financial circumstances of TANF recipients, TANF performance measures, interactions between TANF and child support, as well as specific provisions of state TANF programs.  Key highlights from the TANF Eleventh Report to Congress include:

    • In FY 2013, states received federal TANF block grants and supplemental grants totaling $16.5 billion.  In addition, 19 qualifying states received a combined total of about $529 million in FY 2013 contingency funds.
    • Combined federal TANF and state Maintenance-of-Effort (MOE) expenditures totaled $31.6 billion in FY 2013.  On a national level, states spent 28 percent of this total on basic assistance (largely cash aid to meet a family’s ongoing basic needs), 16 percent on child care, and 6 percent on work-related activities.
    • In FY 2013, a monthly average of 1.75 million families, with 4.10 million recipients, received TANF assistance funded either by federal TANF block grant funds or state MOE funds, including assistance funded through separate state programs (SSPs).
    • The national average overall work participation rate achieved in FY 2013 was 33.5 percent, and the national average two-parent rate was 32.9 percent. Eleven states failed to meet their adjusted overall standard in FY 2013, a decline compared to FY 2012.
    • In FY 2013, the average number of recipients in TANF families was 2.3, including an average of 1.8 child recipients.  About 50 percent of recipient families had only one child.  Approximately 75 percent of children receiving TANF assistance were young children under the age of 12.
    • There were approximately 811,500 child-only cases (those where no adult is receiving TANF assistance) in FY 2013, accounting for about 50 percent of the total TANF caseload.
    • The average monthly amount of assistance for TANF recipient families was $378 in FY 2013.  About 17 percent of TANF families in FY 2013 had non-TANF income; 11 percent had earned income with an average monthly amount of $836, while 7 percent of the TANF families had unearned income with an average monthly amount of $479.
    • At the end of FY 2013, 68 Tribal TANF plans were approved to operate on behalf of 280 tribes and Alaska Native villages and serve the non-reservation area of 120 counties. Tribal TANF programs served an average monthly caseload of 12,961 families in FY 2013, and grants allocated to the approved programs totaled $183,112,879.

    The report also documents current family self-sufficiency and stability-related research, describes federal efforts to promote healthy marriage and responsible fatherhood, provides national data on out-of-wedlock births, and presents child poverty statistics. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Swenson, Kendall; Halpern, Peggy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The purpose of this completed in-house study was to gain a greater understanding of the characteristics and participation of AI/ANs in state and tribal programs over time. Administrative data submitted to HHS by state and tribal programs were analyzed in order to obtain a full picture of the caseload sizes and characteristics of these populations such as type of caseload, average grant amount per family, work participation, and geographic location and travel time. In addition comparisons between state, tribal programs and non-AI/AN caseloads in state programs regarding their characteristics were presented. (author abstract)

    The purpose of this completed in-house study was to gain a greater understanding of the characteristics and participation of AI/ANs in state and tribal programs over time. Administrative data submitted to HHS by state and tribal programs were analyzed in order to obtain a full picture of the caseload sizes and characteristics of these populations such as type of caseload, average grant amount per family, work participation, and geographic location and travel time. In addition comparisons between state, tribal programs and non-AI/AN caseloads in state programs regarding their characteristics were presented. (author abstract)

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