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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Clum, Kim; McDaniel, Marla; Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Timmerman, Larry; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bird, Kisha; Amaechi, Andrea; West Bey, Nia; Taliaferro, Wayne
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    Youth of color are full of promise; they are courageous, intelligent, creative, curious, bold, and resilient. An investment strategy placing them at the center and addressing the structural barriers that keep them locked out of social, emotional, and economic prosperity because of their race/ethnicity, gender, and/or zip code is both fiscally responsible and socially responsible. Leaders at all levels and in all sectors--from law enforcement to education and in the public and private sectors--must value the lives of young men and women of color and acknowledge implicit biases that promulgate negative stereotypes. Public policy reforms to expand youth justice and diversion strategies should not be based on a single program model, rather public policy should build the community capacity to create and/or strengthen a comprehensive delivery system for youth, whereby justice, workforce, education, mental health, and community-based partners are indispensable. This paper represents a first step towards a more powerfully linked agenda for justice reform. In particular, the paper...

    Youth of color are full of promise; they are courageous, intelligent, creative, curious, bold, and resilient. An investment strategy placing them at the center and addressing the structural barriers that keep them locked out of social, emotional, and economic prosperity because of their race/ethnicity, gender, and/or zip code is both fiscally responsible and socially responsible. Leaders at all levels and in all sectors--from law enforcement to education and in the public and private sectors--must value the lives of young men and women of color and acknowledge implicit biases that promulgate negative stereotypes. Public policy reforms to expand youth justice and diversion strategies should not be based on a single program model, rather public policy should build the community capacity to create and/or strengthen a comprehensive delivery system for youth, whereby justice, workforce, education, mental health, and community-based partners are indispensable. This paper represents a first step towards a more powerfully linked agenda for justice reform. In particular, the paper proposes policy strategies that envision work and educational opportunities, along with health and mental health supports, as part of the formula needed to dismantle structural barriers that push youth of color out of school and into detention and incarceration; prevent them from obtaining employment and entering careers with family sustaining wages; and lock them perpetually out of opportunity. The goal of this paper is to provide a framework for recommendations to expand youth justice reform and diversion strategies based on these core ideas of education and employment pathways along with health and mental health supports that can prevent youth of color from entering the juvenile or criminal justice system in the first place, and better support them during and after detention, placement, and/or incarceration. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 2000

    The Administration for Children and Families is issuing final regulations to implement key tribal provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF program and the new tribal work activities program—the Native Employment Works, or NEW Program. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Public Law 104-193, established the Tribal TANF and NEW Programs. Subsequent technical changes were enacted by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33. The TANF block grant program replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program.

    These Final Rules reflect new Federal, Tribal, and State relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving TANF recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance. They also reflect the...

    The Administration for Children and Families is issuing final regulations to implement key tribal provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF program and the new tribal work activities program—the Native Employment Works, or NEW Program. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Public Law 104-193, established the Tribal TANF and NEW Programs. Subsequent technical changes were enacted by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33. The TANF block grant program replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program.

    These Final Rules reflect new Federal, Tribal, and State relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving TANF recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance. They also reflect the Administration's commitment to regulatory reform (author abstract).

    65 Fed. Reg. 8478 (2000). 

     

  • Individual Author: Cole, Patricia; Buel, Sarah M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This paper looks at family violence and its impact upon the transition from welfare to work under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) established by the 1996 welfare reform. Recommendations are presented which encourages advocates and others to increase their involvement in welfare reform and other initiatives that target families living in extreme poverty. The paper addressed two primary issues. First, working within the TANF and welfare to work systems were discussed in order to identify and assist women in violent partnerships. And, second, helping low-income women gain employment and other necessary assistance so they are able to support themselves and escape the violent situation their poverty had perpetuated. Insights offered included: (1) women in extremely low-income households are much more likely to be victims of violence than women in higher-income households; (2) traditional mainstream approaches to helping battered women are often ineffective; and (3) it is impossible to separate women’s experiences with and responses to partner violence from...

    This paper looks at family violence and its impact upon the transition from welfare to work under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) established by the 1996 welfare reform. Recommendations are presented which encourages advocates and others to increase their involvement in welfare reform and other initiatives that target families living in extreme poverty. The paper addressed two primary issues. First, working within the TANF and welfare to work systems were discussed in order to identify and assist women in violent partnerships. And, second, helping low-income women gain employment and other necessary assistance so they are able to support themselves and escape the violent situation their poverty had perpetuated. Insights offered included: (1) women in extremely low-income households are much more likely to be victims of violence than women in higher-income households; (2) traditional mainstream approaches to helping battered women are often ineffective; and (3) it is impossible to separate women’s experiences with and responses to partner violence from the impact of poverty and other oppressions in their lives. The paper emphasized the Family Violence Option (FVO) allowing States to exempt TANF recipients from workforce participation if it would escalate domestic violence, impede escape from domestic violence, or result in sanctions against women as a result of domestic violence. Several insights were gained on how to reach and assist women in dealing with violent relationships that included: (1) services need to be located at or near TANF offices; (2) programs need to be race conscious, being both sensitive and responsive to different cultural experiences and values in order to achieve program participation; (3) basic survival needs, such as housing, food, clothing, or health care must be resolved before or as part of the work around family violence issues; and (4) assistance must be offered to increase their safety while in the abusive relationship. Several recommendations were offered as to how women in poverty who suffer from domestic violence should be treated that included: (1) providing pre- and post- employment education and training; (2) providing services necessary to gain and maintain living-wage employment; and (3) providing ongoing support in the areas of housing, child care, food stamps, and health care for those unable to get and keep jobs that have adequate wages and benefits. Welfare reform is seen as having brought attention to many battered women previously overlooked. Creating effective solutions is viewed as necessary to allow them to be both safe and financially secure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Hafford, Carol; Fromknecht, Catharine; Phillips, Emily; Miesfeld, Noelle; Nadel, Tori
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report summarizes:

    • the findings from a review of the literature on tribal research oversight,
    • approaches to conducting evaluations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and
    • strategies and models used to implement programs similar to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 Program.

    Additionally, this report describes how the findings from the literature review have informed the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 program supports demonstration projects that provide TANF recipients and other low-income individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the Tribal HPOG 2.0 Program. (Author abstract) 

    This report summarizes:

    • the findings from a review of the literature on tribal research oversight,
    • approaches to conducting evaluations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and
    • strategies and models used to implement programs similar to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 Program.

    Additionally, this report describes how the findings from the literature review have informed the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 program supports demonstration projects that provide TANF recipients and other low-income individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the Tribal HPOG 2.0 Program. (Author abstract) 

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