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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Redcross, Cindy; Barden, Bret; Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism....

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism.
    • Most programs increased payment of child support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Blackwell, Wendy; Braswell, Kenneth; Doar, Robert; Klein Vogel, Lisa; Scott, Mindy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Can researchers and practitioners reverse the trend of low labor force participation among working-age men? This panel discussion highlighted a range of policy options, implementation findings from a study on employment services for noncustodial parents, and how the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse supports practitioners to develop workforce development activities in responsible fatherhood programs. Kenneth Braswell (Fathers Incorporated) moderated the session and Wendy Blackwell (Center for Urban Families) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Can researchers and practitioners reverse the trend of low labor force participation among working-age men? This panel discussion highlighted a range of policy options, implementation findings from a study on employment services for noncustodial parents, and how the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse supports practitioners to develop workforce development activities in responsible fatherhood programs. Kenneth Braswell (Fathers Incorporated) moderated the session and Wendy Blackwell (Center for Urban Families) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Acs, Gregory; Loprest, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Over the past decade, state and federal welfare policies have increasingly emphasized moving welfare recipients into jobs, and over this time period large numbers of recipients have gone to work. As welfare recipients enter the labor market they join other groups of disadvantaged and less-skilled workers seeking jobs, including ex-offenders, high-school drop-outs, less-educated young black men, and single mothers who are not receiving welfare. These workers all face similar challenges in the labor market: finding jobs that offer benefits and relatively high wages, retaining jobs once found, and finding opportunities for advancement. Most past research in this area has focused on the workers themselves—the supply side of the labor market—and what individual characteristics are associated with better jobs and advancement. This is only half the equation. Understanding the hiring practices, job requirements, and workplace policies of employers—the demand side—can provide considerable information to policy makers interested in promoting work and advancement among welfare recipients...

    Over the past decade, state and federal welfare policies have increasingly emphasized moving welfare recipients into jobs, and over this time period large numbers of recipients have gone to work. As welfare recipients enter the labor market they join other groups of disadvantaged and less-skilled workers seeking jobs, including ex-offenders, high-school drop-outs, less-educated young black men, and single mothers who are not receiving welfare. These workers all face similar challenges in the labor market: finding jobs that offer benefits and relatively high wages, retaining jobs once found, and finding opportunities for advancement. Most past research in this area has focused on the workers themselves—the supply side of the labor market—and what individual characteristics are associated with better jobs and advancement. This is only half the equation. Understanding the hiring practices, job requirements, and workplace policies of employers—the demand side—can provide considerable information to policy makers interested in promoting work and advancement among welfare recipients and other less-skilled workers. To this end, in 2007 the authors fielded a nationally representative survey of private-sector employers to provide information about employers’ practices and workplace policies relevant for less-skilled workers. They gathered information on employer characteristics, job requirements, wages and benefits, hiring practices, and potential for advancement. The survey focuses on employers’ most recently filled jobs that require no more education than a high school degree or GED; we refer to these jobs as non-college jobs. This group of jobs includes both entry-level jobs—-those requiring minimal skills and experience—-as well as “next-level” jobs—-non-college jobs demanding higher skill and experience and potentially offering higher wages and benefits. The rest of this Executive Summary outlines major findings and gives a brief discussion of the implications for policy. Exhibit E1 at the end of the Executive Summary is a chart of major findings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rangarajan, Anu; Schochet, Peter; Chu, Dexter
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    One of the most important themes of today’s welfare debate is the goal of moving mothers from welfare to work. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) includes strong incentives for state agencies to move recipients into the labor force. State and local policymakers now express significant interest in the issue of job retention and in designing programs to facilitate job retention or rapid reemployment. Anticipating this need, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. to provide program operators and policymakers with useful information on issues related to labor force attachment for welfare recipients. In particular, ACF had two broad goals for this study: (1) to provide some benchmarks regarding the employment patterns of welfare recipients who find jobs and the factors associated with job loss or job retention; and (2) to shed light on the feasibility of targeting resources to those who are most likely to have long periods...

    One of the most important themes of today’s welfare debate is the goal of moving mothers from welfare to work. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) includes strong incentives for state agencies to move recipients into the labor force. State and local policymakers now express significant interest in the issue of job retention and in designing programs to facilitate job retention or rapid reemployment. Anticipating this need, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. to provide program operators and policymakers with useful information on issues related to labor force attachment for welfare recipients. In particular, ACF had two broad goals for this study: (1) to provide some benchmarks regarding the employment patterns of welfare recipients who find jobs and the factors associated with job loss or job retention; and (2) to shed light on the feasibility of targeting resources to those who are most likely to have long periods of nonemployment. This report uses national data to examine the employment experiences of welfare recipients who find jobs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clum, Kim; McDaniel, Marla; Pharris-Ciurej, Nikolas; Timmerman, Larry; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). On many measures of economic well-being, African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic and Latino children and families appear to be worse off than white children and families. This panel drew linkages among data, conceptual, and practical work to help us develop a better understanding of factors that may contribute to the persistence of these racial and ethnic disparities, to their identification, and to their amelioration. Kimberly Clum (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

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