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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Sard, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This paper is divided in four sections. The introductory section briefly states the case for why housing issues should be considered as part of welfare reform. The second section lists proposed changes in the TANF statute. The third section lists proposed changes in housing programs and new housing initiatives that could proceed through the housing committees, as a parallel process to TANF reauthorization. The housing ideas are further divided into proposals targeted on current and recent TANF families, and proposals to address housing problems more broadly, including those of poor families with children. The fourth section is a set of proposed changes to federal housing programs that would promote marriage and family formation. (author abstract)

    This paper is divided in four sections. The introductory section briefly states the case for why housing issues should be considered as part of welfare reform. The second section lists proposed changes in the TANF statute. The third section lists proposed changes in housing programs and new housing initiatives that could proceed through the housing committees, as a parallel process to TANF reauthorization. The housing ideas are further divided into proposals targeted on current and recent TANF families, and proposals to address housing problems more broadly, including those of poor families with children. The fourth section is a set of proposed changes to federal housing programs that would promote marriage and family formation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kingsley, G. Thomas
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    Federal housing assistance was seldom mentioned in the mid-1990s’ debate over devolution of America’s social safety net. Yet in FY 1995, federal outlays for housing assistance to the poor ($19 billion) exceeded those for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) by $7 billion.

    A sizable share (about one-fifth) of households that receive AFDC also benefit from federal housing subsidies administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Moreover, those receiving HUD assistance account for a much larger share of long-term welfare recipients—those likely to have the most difficulty finding and retaining employment—than welfare families that don’t receive federal housing assistance. Among AFDC beneficiaries in 1994, for example, the median cumulative period of welfare recipiency for those who also received HUD assistance was 57 months; for those not receiving HUD assistance, the comparable period was 37 months.

    Whether or not welfare recipients also receive housing assistance will greatly influence the immediate circumstances and, possibly,...

    Federal housing assistance was seldom mentioned in the mid-1990s’ debate over devolution of America’s social safety net. Yet in FY 1995, federal outlays for housing assistance to the poor ($19 billion) exceeded those for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) by $7 billion.

    A sizable share (about one-fifth) of households that receive AFDC also benefit from federal housing subsidies administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Moreover, those receiving HUD assistance account for a much larger share of long-term welfare recipients—those likely to have the most difficulty finding and retaining employment—than welfare families that don’t receive federal housing assistance. Among AFDC beneficiaries in 1994, for example, the median cumulative period of welfare recipiency for those who also received HUD assistance was 57 months; for those not receiving HUD assistance, the comparable period was 37 months.

    Whether or not welfare recipients also receive housing assistance will greatly influence the immediate circumstances and, possibly, the longer-term opportunities of those directly affected by welfare reforms and cutbacks in related social programs. Welfare reform may also have a marked impact on the financial condition of HUD’s housing programs. Tremendous variations in HUD assistance across states and localities (explained below), together with the new discretion states have been given to run their own welfare programs, mean that housing assistance and welfare interactions at the local level will significantly affect state responses to devolution.

    What are the possible outcomes of interactions between housing assistance and welfare reform? We preface our speculation with a discussion about how federal housing assistance differs from many other safety net programs, the forms it takes, who it serves, and the relevancy of housing reforms to welfare reform. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Salsich, Peter W. Jr.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    This paper will explore the relationship between affordable housing and self-sufficiency, and will argue that the new welfare reform policy will not succeed unless it is accompanied by a revitalized housing policy that combines a significant number of additional housing vouchers with effective homeownership opportunities for persons coming off welfare. (author abstract)

    This paper will explore the relationship between affordable housing and self-sufficiency, and will argue that the new welfare reform policy will not succeed unless it is accompanied by a revitalized housing policy that combines a significant number of additional housing vouchers with effective homeownership opportunities for persons coming off welfare. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sard, Barbara; Strom, Shayna
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The Senate VA-HUD appropriations bill for fiscal year 2003 (S. 2797), approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee in late July, includes several improvements to the Welfare-to-Work Housing Voucher Program that should enable public housing agencies (PHAs) to build on the program’s successes to date. The legislation also should encourage states and housing agencies to contribute additional resources to help families have stable, affordable housing during their transition from welfare to work. In addition, the legislation would fund approximately 3,300 new welfare-to-work vouchers, as well as an overall total of 15,000 new vouchers. Unfortunately, these amounts fall well short of the need for new vouchers. Congress should fund at least the 34,000 new vouchers the Bush Administration requested and should set aside one-third of these new vouchers for families moving from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The Senate VA-HUD appropriations bill for fiscal year 2003 (S. 2797), approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee in late July, includes several improvements to the Welfare-to-Work Housing Voucher Program that should enable public housing agencies (PHAs) to build on the program’s successes to date. The legislation also should encourage states and housing agencies to contribute additional resources to help families have stable, affordable housing during their transition from welfare to work. In addition, the legislation would fund approximately 3,300 new welfare-to-work vouchers, as well as an overall total of 15,000 new vouchers. Unfortunately, these amounts fall well short of the need for new vouchers. Congress should fund at least the 34,000 new vouchers the Bush Administration requested and should set aside one-third of these new vouchers for families moving from welfare to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Collard, Carol S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Securing adequate housing is a key component in achieving family well-being and a decent quality of life. It is expected that as many as twenty percent of the families currently on welfare, many of whom are disproportionately female and African American, may not be employable by the end of their lifetime benefit. These families, classified as “hard-to-serve” or “hard-to-employ,” are headed by an adult who may be struggling with substance abuse, physical or mental health problems, as well as low literacy and social competency issues that inhibit achieving self-sufficiency. This author will examine existing literature on welfare-dependent households coping with substance abuse and mental health problems, and how the lack of affordable housing impacts their ability to achieve self-sufficiency. This article presents a case study of Delowe Village Apartments, a supportive housing development in Georgia that combines the provision of social services with affordable housing. (author abstract)

    Securing adequate housing is a key component in achieving family well-being and a decent quality of life. It is expected that as many as twenty percent of the families currently on welfare, many of whom are disproportionately female and African American, may not be employable by the end of their lifetime benefit. These families, classified as “hard-to-serve” or “hard-to-employ,” are headed by an adult who may be struggling with substance abuse, physical or mental health problems, as well as low literacy and social competency issues that inhibit achieving self-sufficiency. This author will examine existing literature on welfare-dependent households coping with substance abuse and mental health problems, and how the lack of affordable housing impacts their ability to achieve self-sufficiency. This article presents a case study of Delowe Village Apartments, a supportive housing development in Georgia that combines the provision of social services with affordable housing. (author abstract)

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