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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Stone, Chad; Chen, William
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The federal-state unemployment insurance system (UI) helps many people who have lost their jobs by temporarily replacing part of their wages while they look for work. Created in 1935, it is a form of social insurance in which taxes collected from employers are paid into the system on behalf of working people to provide them with income support if they lose their jobs. The system also helps sustain consumer demand during economic downturns by providing a continuing stream of dollars for families to spend. (author introduction)

    The federal-state unemployment insurance system (UI) helps many people who have lost their jobs by temporarily replacing part of their wages while they look for work. Created in 1935, it is a form of social insurance in which taxes collected from employers are paid into the system on behalf of working people to provide them with income support if they lose their jobs. The system also helps sustain consumer demand during economic downturns by providing a continuing stream of dollars for families to spend. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Lindner, Stephan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    This paper examines whether Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits affect the decision to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). Using data from the Survey of Income and Benefits matched to administrative records on DI applications, the author finds that higher UI benefits reduce applications for DI. This substitution effect is imprecisely estimated but economically significant, implying that a $1.00 increase in UI benefits reduces DI expenditures by 15 cents. Recognizing this cost-saving effect would increase the optimal UI benefit level by more than 20 percent for coefficients of relative risk aversion ranging from two to five. (Author abstract)

    This paper examines whether Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits affect the decision to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). Using data from the Survey of Income and Benefits matched to administrative records on DI applications, the author finds that higher UI benefits reduce applications for DI. This substitution effect is imprecisely estimated but economically significant, implying that a $1.00 increase in UI benefits reduces DI expenditures by 15 cents. Recognizing this cost-saving effect would increase the optimal UI benefit level by more than 20 percent for coefficients of relative risk aversion ranging from two to five. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Enchauteguai, Maria E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The unemployment insurance system is composed of state programs guided by broad federal principles, with funding and eligibility rules left to the states. The participation of employers injects a good deal of contentiousness and errors, while the principle of "no fault of their own" limits the eligibility of many workers who separate from their jobs for family and health reasons or because their temporary job ended. This system leaves many disadvantaged workers behind to the extent that only between 10 and 36 percent of unemployed workers with labor market disadvantages collected benefits in 2010, in comparison to 69 percent of non-disadvantaged workers. (author abstract)

    The unemployment insurance system is composed of state programs guided by broad federal principles, with funding and eligibility rules left to the states. The participation of employers injects a good deal of contentiousness and errors, while the principle of "no fault of their own" limits the eligibility of many workers who separate from their jobs for family and health reasons or because their temporary job ended. This system leaves many disadvantaged workers behind to the extent that only between 10 and 36 percent of unemployed workers with labor market disadvantages collected benefits in 2010, in comparison to 69 percent of non-disadvantaged workers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gould-Werth, Alix; Shaefer, H. Luke
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Among unemployed workers, the less educated and racial and ethnic minorities are less likely than the highly educated and White non-Hispanics to apply for and to receive unemployment insurance benefits; those who are less educated are also far more likely to perceive themselves as ineligible for benefits for monetary reasons. (author abstract)

    Among unemployed workers, the less educated and racial and ethnic minorities are less likely than the highly educated and White non-Hispanics to apply for and to receive unemployment insurance benefits; those who are less educated are also far more likely to perceive themselves as ineligible for benefits for monetary reasons. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shaefer, Luke; Gould-Werth, Alix; Hertel-Fernandez, Alex; McKenna, Claire
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On August 19, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) and the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan co-hosted a Webinar on Unemployment Insurance policies and opportunities. The Webinar, titled Making Unemployment Insurance Work Better for Low-Income Working Families, addressed the factors that influence low-income families’ access to Unemployment Insurance, including monetary eligibility, non-monetary eligibility, and differential take-up. It was designed as a cross-disciplinary discussion, presenting two recent papers and then hearing from the National Employment Law Project about how state policies impact access to Unemployment Insurance benefits for low-wage workers.

    The Webinar was facilitated by H. Luke Shaefer, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work and affiliate at the National Poverty Center of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. The two papers were presented by Alix Gould-Werth, Doctoral Candidate in Social Work and Sociology at the University of Michigan and...

    On August 19, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) and the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan co-hosted a Webinar on Unemployment Insurance policies and opportunities. The Webinar, titled Making Unemployment Insurance Work Better for Low-Income Working Families, addressed the factors that influence low-income families’ access to Unemployment Insurance, including monetary eligibility, non-monetary eligibility, and differential take-up. It was designed as a cross-disciplinary discussion, presenting two recent papers and then hearing from the National Employment Law Project about how state policies impact access to Unemployment Insurance benefits for low-wage workers.

    The Webinar was facilitated by H. Luke Shaefer, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work and affiliate at the National Poverty Center of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. The two papers were presented by Alix Gould-Werth, Doctoral Candidate in Social Work and Sociology at the University of Michigan and Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Doctoral Candidate in Government and Social Policy and graduate fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy at Harvard University. Claire McKenna, Policy Analyst at the National Employment Law Project addressed trends in State policies.

    This document is a transcript of the Webinar. The PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the Webinar can be found here.

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