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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Pollack, Harold A.; Danzinger, Sheldon; Jayakody, Rukmalie; Seefeldt, Kristin S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Illicit drug use by welfare recipients has been identified as an important barrier to well-being and social performance. This paper uses nationally representative cross-sectional data, and Michigan-specific panel data, to summarize trends in substance use among AFDC/TANF recipients. It also examines the prevalence of drug use disorders within the welfare population. Although almost 20 percent of welfare recipients report recent use of some illicit substance, our analysis indicates that only a small minority of welfare recipients satisfy screening criteria for chemical dependence. The paper concludes by considering policy responses to substance use disorders following welfare reform. (author abstract)

    Illicit drug use by welfare recipients has been identified as an important barrier to well-being and social performance. This paper uses nationally representative cross-sectional data, and Michigan-specific panel data, to summarize trends in substance use among AFDC/TANF recipients. It also examines the prevalence of drug use disorders within the welfare population. Although almost 20 percent of welfare recipients report recent use of some illicit substance, our analysis indicates that only a small minority of welfare recipients satisfy screening criteria for chemical dependence. The paper concludes by considering policy responses to substance use disorders following welfare reform. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ghertner, Robin; Groves, Lincoln
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study examines relationships between indicators of economic opportunity and the prevalence of prescription opioids and substance use in the United States. Overall, areas with lower economic opportunity are disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis. However, the extent of that relationship varies regionally.

    (1) The prevalence of drug overdose deaths and opioid prescriptions has risen unevenly across the county, with rural areas more heavily affected. Specific geographic areas, such as Appalachia, parts of the West and the Midwest, and New England, have seen higher prevalence than other areas.

    (2) Poverty, unemployment rates, and the employment-to-population ratio are highly correlated with the prevalence of prescription opioids and with substance use measures. On average, counties with worse economic prospects are more likely to have higher rates of opioid prescriptions, opioid-related hospitalizations, and drug overdose deaths.

    (3) Some high-poverty regions of the country were relatively isolated from the opioid epidemic, as shown by our...

    This study examines relationships between indicators of economic opportunity and the prevalence of prescription opioids and substance use in the United States. Overall, areas with lower economic opportunity are disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis. However, the extent of that relationship varies regionally.

    (1) The prevalence of drug overdose deaths and opioid prescriptions has risen unevenly across the county, with rural areas more heavily affected. Specific geographic areas, such as Appalachia, parts of the West and the Midwest, and New England, have seen higher prevalence than other areas.

    (2) Poverty, unemployment rates, and the employment-to-population ratio are highly correlated with the prevalence of prescription opioids and with substance use measures. On average, counties with worse economic prospects are more likely to have higher rates of opioid prescriptions, opioid-related hospitalizations, and drug overdose deaths.

    (3) Some high-poverty regions of the country were relatively isolated from the opioid epidemic, as shown by our substance use measures, as of 2016. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spjeldnes, Solveig; Yamatani, Hide; Davis, Maggie M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    An estimated 50,000 parents are behind bars on average daily for child support nonpayment, but information about these fathers and their recidivism rates are lacking. Using a jail sample (N = 16,382), multinomial logistics regression method was utilized; subgroup analysis was used to investigate differential beta weights of predictor variables. Informed by Critical Race Theory, findings showed that fathers incarcerated for arrears had significantly higher rates of recidivism than other jailed men, but had an interaction effect with race. After controlling for age, education, and prior attendance at 12-step meetings, Black fathers but NOT White fathers showed significant post-release recidivism. Implications are discussed. (Author abstract)

    An estimated 50,000 parents are behind bars on average daily for child support nonpayment, but information about these fathers and their recidivism rates are lacking. Using a jail sample (N = 16,382), multinomial logistics regression method was utilized; subgroup analysis was used to investigate differential beta weights of predictor variables. Informed by Critical Race Theory, findings showed that fathers incarcerated for arrears had significantly higher rates of recidivism than other jailed men, but had an interaction effect with race. After controlling for age, education, and prior attendance at 12-step meetings, Black fathers but NOT White fathers showed significant post-release recidivism. Implications are discussed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ryan, Andrea Kay
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Objective: This study extended previous research on the association of substance use with family formation behavior by assessing the effects of the type and extent of adolescent substance use in a competing risks model. Substance use was expected to increase the likelihood of nonmarital family formation overall and differently by gender. Method: Longitudinal data from home interviews with the 14- to 16-year-old respondents to the first wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N = 4,011) were used in multinomial logistic regressions estimating the odds that first cohabitation, parenthood, or remaining single occurred before first marriage among five types of substance users compared with nonusers. Full sample analysis preceded separate analyses of women (n = 1,946) and men (n = 2,065). Results: Illegal drug use and concurrent substance use increased the likelihood that cohabitation, as opposed to marriage, was the first family type. Concurrent use of three types of substances had the largest effect on family formation behavior. The effects of singular marijuana use...

    Objective: This study extended previous research on the association of substance use with family formation behavior by assessing the effects of the type and extent of adolescent substance use in a competing risks model. Substance use was expected to increase the likelihood of nonmarital family formation overall and differently by gender. Method: Longitudinal data from home interviews with the 14- to 16-year-old respondents to the first wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N = 4,011) were used in multinomial logistic regressions estimating the odds that first cohabitation, parenthood, or remaining single occurred before first marriage among five types of substance users compared with nonusers. Full sample analysis preceded separate analyses of women (n = 1,946) and men (n = 2,065). Results: Illegal drug use and concurrent substance use increased the likelihood that cohabitation, as opposed to marriage, was the first family type. Concurrent use of three types of substances had the largest effect on family formation behavior. The effects of singular marijuana use mattered only for men. The effects of substance use on parenthood as the first family type were significant only for women and increased the likelihood that marriage occurred first. Conclusions: The effects of substance use depended on the type(s) of substance(s) used, singular or concurrent use, and gender. Previous research regarding cohabitation was supported and extended. Assumptions that substance use leads to teenage or unwed parenthood based on the relationship of substance use to pregnancy or its predictors should be re-examined. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Ghertner, Robin; Baldwin, Melinda; Crouse, Gilbert; Radel, Laura; Waters, Annette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This research brief describes how select indicators associated with substance use prevalence relate to the changing trend in child welfare caseloads. It is part of a series describing findings of a mixed methods study undertaken to better understand how parental substance use relates to child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 following years of sustained declines. (Author abstract)

    This research brief describes how select indicators associated with substance use prevalence relate to the changing trend in child welfare caseloads. It is part of a series describing findings of a mixed methods study undertaken to better understand how parental substance use relates to child welfare caseloads, which began rising in 2012 following years of sustained declines. (Author abstract)

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