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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Edmiston, Kelly D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The worst recession in U.S. postwar history, starting in late 2007, confronted low- and moderate-income families and individuals with distinct challenges. To address the severe lack of data on the "LMI," population, the Kansas City Fed launched its LMI Survey in 2009.

    Distributed to more than 700 organizations that provide services to the LMI population, the Survey elicits a wealth of qualitative reporting. It also produces quantitative data, including several quarterly indexes that track changes in LMI financial conditions over time.

    Edmiston summarizes insights from the Survey on how the recession and anemic recovery have affected job availability for the LMI population, affordable housing, access to credit and demand for basic services. The findings are useful for policymakers seeking to promote financial success among the 30 million U.S. families classified as LMI. (author abstract)

    The worst recession in U.S. postwar history, starting in late 2007, confronted low- and moderate-income families and individuals with distinct challenges. To address the severe lack of data on the "LMI," population, the Kansas City Fed launched its LMI Survey in 2009.

    Distributed to more than 700 organizations that provide services to the LMI population, the Survey elicits a wealth of qualitative reporting. It also produces quantitative data, including several quarterly indexes that track changes in LMI financial conditions over time.

    Edmiston summarizes insights from the Survey on how the recession and anemic recovery have affected job availability for the LMI population, affordable housing, access to credit and demand for basic services. The findings are useful for policymakers seeking to promote financial success among the 30 million U.S. families classified as LMI. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Modicamore, Dominic
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Colorado is home to thousands of refugees from all over the world who fled violence and persecution to seek safety and sanctuary in the United States. As these individuals and families put down roots in Colorado, they spark a multitude of regional economic impacts through their spending and through the wages they earn working in industries across the economy. To better understand and quantify these economic implications, the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Refugee Services Program (CRSP) commissioned ICF to measure the economic impact of refugees in Colorado. The intent of this study is to understand the economic impact of the public support paid to refugees and their families as well as the economic impact of refugees’ employment earnings over time. This study is unique for four key reasons:

    • first, unlike previous studies, this analysis relied on actual data on individual refugees’ receipt of public services as well as their earnings;
    • second, this study included not only the impact of public spending on refugees, but also assessed the impact of...

    Colorado is home to thousands of refugees from all over the world who fled violence and persecution to seek safety and sanctuary in the United States. As these individuals and families put down roots in Colorado, they spark a multitude of regional economic impacts through their spending and through the wages they earn working in industries across the economy. To better understand and quantify these economic implications, the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Refugee Services Program (CRSP) commissioned ICF to measure the economic impact of refugees in Colorado. The intent of this study is to understand the economic impact of the public support paid to refugees and their families as well as the economic impact of refugees’ employment earnings over time. This study is unique for four key reasons:

    • first, unlike previous studies, this analysis relied on actual data on individual refugees’ receipt of public services as well as their earnings;
    • second, this study included not only the impact of public spending on refugees, but also assessed the impact of refugees’ earnings in the economy – a critical component of understanding the full scope of impact;
    • third, this analysis used a cohort approach in order to capture a static population of refugees across multiple years;
    • fourth, this analysis accounted for the spending of Colorado taxpayer dollars on refugee assistance by subtracting the impact that would have been generated if the taxpayer had retained that income; and
    • separate from the primary economic impact and fiscal analyses, this report also includes three case studies that provide additional insight into refugee resettlement in Colorado. (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Hendey, Leah; Kingsley, G. Thomas
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This report reviews recent trends for social and economic conditions in the 10 metropolitan areas that form the context for the neighborhood programs being implemented as a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Making Connections (MC) initiative. It finds that the sites are strikingly diverse along many dimensions and in are many ways representative of the diversity in conditions and trends across America’s metropolitan areas. In almost all cases, these areas’ economies followed the pattern of the nation over the past decade—booming in the late 1990s, declining over the first two years of this decade, and then partially recovering through 2007. But there were stark contrasts. Since 2002, for example, two MC metros attained among the nation’s highest rates of employment growth (Denver and Seattle) while two others experienced serious declines (Oakland and Milwaukee). Although there were important differences in magnitudes, all sites shared in a number of trends: minority groups growing as a share of total population and improvements in several social indicators (e.g., in crime...

    This report reviews recent trends for social and economic conditions in the 10 metropolitan areas that form the context for the neighborhood programs being implemented as a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Making Connections (MC) initiative. It finds that the sites are strikingly diverse along many dimensions and in are many ways representative of the diversity in conditions and trends across America’s metropolitan areas. In almost all cases, these areas’ economies followed the pattern of the nation over the past decade—booming in the late 1990s, declining over the first two years of this decade, and then partially recovering through 2007. But there were stark contrasts. Since 2002, for example, two MC metros attained among the nation’s highest rates of employment growth (Denver and Seattle) while two others experienced serious declines (Oakland and Milwaukee). Although there were important differences in magnitudes, all sites shared in a number of trends: minority groups growing as a share of total population and improvements in several social indicators (e.g., in crime and teen pregnancy) but, disturbingly, notable increases in child poverty. Through 2006, all 10 metros had also witnessed major increases in housing prices but again, differences were marked. Ratios of home prices to income were very high by U.S. standards in Oakland, Seattle, Denver, and Providence but below average in the other six sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Skinner, Curtis; Hartig, Seth; Setty, Suma
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Colorado advocates and policymakers have launched important recent initiatives—both legislated and proposed—to help the state’s struggling working families. This policy brief presents the results of three state policy reforms that promise to significantly improve the economic security of low-income Colorado families with children: (1) Implementing two state income tax credits for families with children that have been signed into law, the Child Tax Credit for children under six years old and the Earned Income Tax Credit; (2) Introducing a free and universal prekindergarten program for four-year-olds; and (3) Initiating universal, full-day kindergarten for five-year-olds. The impact of each of these reforms on the economic security of representative low-income families in the state is estimated with the National Center for Children in Poverty’s 2015 Colorado Family Resource Simulator (FRS) policy modeling tool, updated with the assistance of the Colorado Center on Law and Policy. (Author abstract)

     

    Colorado advocates and policymakers have launched important recent initiatives—both legislated and proposed—to help the state’s struggling working families. This policy brief presents the results of three state policy reforms that promise to significantly improve the economic security of low-income Colorado families with children: (1) Implementing two state income tax credits for families with children that have been signed into law, the Child Tax Credit for children under six years old and the Earned Income Tax Credit; (2) Introducing a free and universal prekindergarten program for four-year-olds; and (3) Initiating universal, full-day kindergarten for five-year-olds. The impact of each of these reforms on the economic security of representative low-income families in the state is estimated with the National Center for Children in Poverty’s 2015 Colorado Family Resource Simulator (FRS) policy modeling tool, updated with the assistance of the Colorado Center on Law and Policy. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Acs, Gregory; Coe, Norma B.; Watson, Keith; Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1998

    The basic analysis describes how the income of a single parent with two children changes as she moves from not working to working at a part-time job at minimum wage, then to full-time work at minimum wage, and finally to a full-time job paying $9/hour. In calculating income, we consider the family's earnings, its Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) grant, the cash value of food stamps it receives, federal and state earned income tax credits, any other state tax credits, and all federal and state tax liabilities. In subsequent analyses, we consider the impact of other public assistance programs such as federal housing assistance, child care subsidies, and Medicaid on work incentives. We then explore how lifetime time limits may affect a family's work-welfare decisions. While we focus on the incentives of welfare recipients to go to work, we also examine how the differential treatment of participants and applicants in benefit determination may affect the decisions of low-income workers to leave work and go on welfare. (author abstract)

    The basic analysis describes how the income of a single parent with two children changes as she moves from not working to working at a part-time job at minimum wage, then to full-time work at minimum wage, and finally to a full-time job paying $9/hour. In calculating income, we consider the family's earnings, its Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) grant, the cash value of food stamps it receives, federal and state earned income tax credits, any other state tax credits, and all federal and state tax liabilities. In subsequent analyses, we consider the impact of other public assistance programs such as federal housing assistance, child care subsidies, and Medicaid on work incentives. We then explore how lifetime time limits may affect a family's work-welfare decisions. While we focus on the incentives of welfare recipients to go to work, we also examine how the differential treatment of participants and applicants in benefit determination may affect the decisions of low-income workers to leave work and go on welfare. (author abstract)

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