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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Comey, Jennifer; Litschwartz, Sophie; Pettit, Kathryn L. S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    How has the recession and its resulting family instability impacted children’s residential and school mobility? Officials from housing, homeless, and school programs discussed the full spectrum of residential mobility in two recent Urban Institute roundtables: from chronic mobility, eviction, and foreclosure to doubled-up households and homelessness. Attendees explored programs and policies to reduce residential and student mobility, as well as brainstormed new ways for different organizations to work together. The discussion centered on examples of school districts, government agencies, and nonprofit housing counseling agencies working together to mitigate the negative effects of mobility. (author abstract)

    How has the recession and its resulting family instability impacted children’s residential and school mobility? Officials from housing, homeless, and school programs discussed the full spectrum of residential mobility in two recent Urban Institute roundtables: from chronic mobility, eviction, and foreclosure to doubled-up households and homelessness. Attendees explored programs and policies to reduce residential and student mobility, as well as brainstormed new ways for different organizations to work together. The discussion centered on examples of school districts, government agencies, and nonprofit housing counseling agencies working together to mitigate the negative effects of mobility. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Long, David A.; Amendolia, Jean M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Whether our country faces good or tough economic times, it is unacceptable for people to live on our streets, locked out of the possibility of a home and with profound challenges to finding or keeping a job. Our nation’s leaders agree. The Administration has set ending chronic homelessness as a national goal. The Congress has called for the development of 150,000 units of permanent supportive housing. The mayors of many of our largest cities cite supportive housing as a cornerstone in their plans to end homelessness. Several governors continue to dedicate scarce resources to supportive housing. Encouraged by the energy of these commitments, we must act to realize the goal and create supportive housing for at least 150,000 more people. And as this report—“Promoting Employment for Homeless People” —by Abt Associates demonstrates, integrating employment services into supportive housing not only benefits tenants, but is a cost effective investment that strengthens communities. (author preface)

     

    Whether our country faces good or tough economic times, it is unacceptable for people to live on our streets, locked out of the possibility of a home and with profound challenges to finding or keeping a job. Our nation’s leaders agree. The Administration has set ending chronic homelessness as a national goal. The Congress has called for the development of 150,000 units of permanent supportive housing. The mayors of many of our largest cities cite supportive housing as a cornerstone in their plans to end homelessness. Several governors continue to dedicate scarce resources to supportive housing. Encouraged by the energy of these commitments, we must act to realize the goal and create supportive housing for at least 150,000 more people. And as this report—“Promoting Employment for Homeless People” —by Abt Associates demonstrates, integrating employment services into supportive housing not only benefits tenants, but is a cost effective investment that strengthens communities. (author preface)

     

  • Individual Author: Burt, Martha R.; Carpenter, Jenneth; Hall, Samuel G.; Henderson, Kathryn A.; Rog, Debra J.; Hornik, John A.; Denton, Ann V.; Moran, Garrett E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    In 2000, HUD, in recognition that any solution to homelessness must emphasize housing, targeted its McKinney-Vento Act homeless competitive programs towards housing activities. This policy decision presumed that mainstream programs such as Medicaid, TANF and General Assistance could pick up the slack produced by the change. This study examines how seven communities sought to improve homeless people’s access to mainstream services following this shift away from funding services through the Supportive Housing Program (SHP). By examining the different organizations used and activities undertaken by communities to maximize homeless people’s access to mainstream benefits and services, this study provides communities with models and strategies that they can use. It also highlights the limits of what even the most resourceful of communities can do to enhance service and benefit access by homeless families and individuals. (author abstract)

    In 2000, HUD, in recognition that any solution to homelessness must emphasize housing, targeted its McKinney-Vento Act homeless competitive programs towards housing activities. This policy decision presumed that mainstream programs such as Medicaid, TANF and General Assistance could pick up the slack produced by the change. This study examines how seven communities sought to improve homeless people’s access to mainstream services following this shift away from funding services through the Supportive Housing Program (SHP). By examining the different organizations used and activities undertaken by communities to maximize homeless people’s access to mainstream benefits and services, this study provides communities with models and strategies that they can use. It also highlights the limits of what even the most resourceful of communities can do to enhance service and benefit access by homeless families and individuals. (author abstract)

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