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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary K. ; Pergamit, Mike; Baum, Abigail; Luna, Jessica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies. The Urban Institute studied FUP design and implementation in eight sites and interviewed key staff and stakeholders about the program’s implementation and impact, highlighting common challenges, innovative practices, and system-level impacts. (Author abstract) 

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies. The Urban Institute studied FUP design and implementation in eight sites and interviewed key staff and stakeholders about the program’s implementation and impact, highlighting common challenges, innovative practices, and system-level impacts. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary K.; Pergamit, Mike; Gillespie, Sarah; Hanson, Devlin; Kooragayala, Shiva
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) are performance-based contracts where private or philanthropic investors loan funds to accomplish a specific objective and are repaid based on whether the program achieves its goals. Denver’s SIB initiative will use funds from investors to provide housing and supportive case management services to at least 250 homeless individuals who frequently use the city’s emergency services.

    Repayment to investors is contingent upon the achievement of the program’s outcome targets for housing stability and a reduction in jail bed days. This report details the independent evaluation designed by the Urban Institute to determine whether the program achieves the outcome targets. (author abstract)

    Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) are performance-based contracts where private or philanthropic investors loan funds to accomplish a specific objective and are repaid based on whether the program achieves its goals. Denver’s SIB initiative will use funds from investors to provide housing and supportive case management services to at least 250 homeless individuals who frequently use the city’s emergency services.

    Repayment to investors is contingent upon the achievement of the program’s outcome targets for housing stability and a reduction in jail bed days. This report details the independent evaluation designed by the Urban Institute to determine whether the program achieves the outcome targets. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Collins, Cyleste C.; D'Andrea, Rebecca; Dean, Kendra; Crampton, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report focuses on the evaluation of FrontLine Service, Inc.’s Housing First pilot for families and young adults using data from the time of the program’s start in April of 2013 to May of 2015. The pilot, led by Enterprise Community Partners with the support of multiple government and foundation funding streams is based on the best practice Housing First model for single adults, and focuses on providing housing to some of the county’s hardest to serve populations—young adults and families who have had substantial homeless histories as well as a disabling condition. Data from multiple sources indicated the strength of the program in retaining 89% of clients, with strong indications of housing stability, and some indications of increased income, and indications of increased self-sufficiency and decreased reliance on case managers over time. However the population remains at high risk of homelessness due to their low incomes and high needs for basic goods to maintain stability, and young adults are at risk for being “lost” to the system. (Author abstract)

    This report focuses on the evaluation of FrontLine Service, Inc.’s Housing First pilot for families and young adults using data from the time of the program’s start in April of 2013 to May of 2015. The pilot, led by Enterprise Community Partners with the support of multiple government and foundation funding streams is based on the best practice Housing First model for single adults, and focuses on providing housing to some of the county’s hardest to serve populations—young adults and families who have had substantial homeless histories as well as a disabling condition. Data from multiple sources indicated the strength of the program in retaining 89% of clients, with strong indications of housing stability, and some indications of increased income, and indications of increased self-sufficiency and decreased reliance on case managers over time. However the population remains at high risk of homelessness due to their low incomes and high needs for basic goods to maintain stability, and young adults are at risk for being “lost” to the system. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Center for Housing Policy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This case study, one of three prepared by the Center for Housing Policy presented at the National Building Museum's How Housing Matters Conference, describes a long-standing program that uses secure and affordable housing, provided through voucher assistance and public housing, to improve residents' economic opportunities.

    The Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) in Montgomery County, Maryland, operates one of the oldest and most established Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) programs in the country. One of the keys to the program’s success is the partnerships HOC has developed to increase its capacity for case management and provide additional resources to help families achieve their educational and employment goals. (author abstract)

    This case study, one of three prepared by the Center for Housing Policy presented at the National Building Museum's How Housing Matters Conference, describes a long-standing program that uses secure and affordable housing, provided through voucher assistance and public housing, to improve residents' economic opportunities.

    The Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) in Montgomery County, Maryland, operates one of the oldest and most established Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) programs in the country. One of the keys to the program’s success is the partnerships HOC has developed to increase its capacity for case management and provide additional resources to help families achieve their educational and employment goals. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Skobba, Kim; Bruin, Marilyn J. ; Yust, Becky L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This mixed-methods study used structured, in-depth interviews to collect data that was analyzed quantitatively as well as qualitatively to explore the long-term housing patterns experienced by low-income families and the ways in which vouchers affect these patterns. Using a life-course theoretical framework and an event history approach, information on past housing, employment, and life circumstances was collected from 30 participants, 17 who had a voucher and 13 on the waiting list to receive one. The low-income families in the study moved frequently, through rental housing, homeless shelters, and living with family and friends. After receiving a voucher, families lived independently in rental housing and had greater housing stability. This research offers a framework for understanding the complex residential mobility patterns of low-income families, which includes the use of informal and formal housing assistance. The findings highlight the high level of housing insecurity experienced by low-income people and emphasize the important role that Housing Choice Vouchers play in...

    This mixed-methods study used structured, in-depth interviews to collect data that was analyzed quantitatively as well as qualitatively to explore the long-term housing patterns experienced by low-income families and the ways in which vouchers affect these patterns. Using a life-course theoretical framework and an event history approach, information on past housing, employment, and life circumstances was collected from 30 participants, 17 who had a voucher and 13 on the waiting list to receive one. The low-income families in the study moved frequently, through rental housing, homeless shelters, and living with family and friends. After receiving a voucher, families lived independently in rental housing and had greater housing stability. This research offers a framework for understanding the complex residential mobility patterns of low-income families, which includes the use of informal and formal housing assistance. The findings highlight the high level of housing insecurity experienced by low-income people and emphasize the important role that Housing Choice Vouchers play in helping families with serious housing problems. (author abstract)

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