Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Center for Research on Child Wellbeing
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    Description: The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study was designed to address four primary questions: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?

    Population: Cohort of ~5,000 children born between 1998-2000, in 20 large U.S. cities (population of 200,000 or more).  Mothers and fathers interviewed at birth, then ages one, three, and five, and in-home assessments conducted at age three and five. 

    Periodicity: Data available for birth, age 1, 3,  5, 9, and 15 collection periods. 

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study was designed to address four primary questions: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?

    Population: Cohort of ~5,000 children born between 1998-2000, in 20 large U.S. cities (population of 200,000 or more).  Mothers and fathers interviewed at birth, then ages one, three, and five, and in-home assessments conducted at age three and five. 

    Periodicity: Data available for birth, age 1, 3,  5, 9, and 15 collection periods. 

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Fontaine, Jocelyn; Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas; Denver, Megan ; Rossman, Shelli B.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This study evaluated the family-inclusive case management component of the Chicago-based Safer Return program, which engages family members in service provision to former prisoners. Using qualitative and quantitative data, the research focused on the associations between family support and family members' and formerly incarcerated persons' short-term outcomes. The research found that family members have strong and positive relationships with their formerly incarcerated relatives. However, engaging families in the reentry process directly can be challenging because incarcerated persons are reticent to nominate family members and/or family members are unwilling or unable to participate in their family member's reentry program. (author abstract)

    This study evaluated the family-inclusive case management component of the Chicago-based Safer Return program, which engages family members in service provision to former prisoners. Using qualitative and quantitative data, the research focused on the associations between family support and family members' and formerly incarcerated persons' short-term outcomes. The research found that family members have strong and positive relationships with their formerly incarcerated relatives. However, engaging families in the reentry process directly can be challenging because incarcerated persons are reticent to nominate family members and/or family members are unwilling or unable to participate in their family member's reentry program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Waldfogel, Jane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Families are changing. In 1975, two-thirds of American children had a stay-at-home parent. Today only about a quarter of children do (see Figure 1). Fully half now live with two parents who both work, while a quarter live with a single parent who works.

    Low-income families are changing too. Today most children in low-income families have working parents, like their more affluent peers. Only 38 percent of children in families with incomes below 200 percent of the poverty line have a stay-at-home parent; about a quarter live with two parents who both work, and 39 percent live with a single parent who works… 

    The challenges facing working families become more difficult during times of financial crisis and economic downturn, such as the United States is experiencing in 2009. As families change in turbulent economic times, family policies need to change, too. The prevention of child poverty in a context in which most low-income parents work but many have insufficient earnings requires (1) work-family policies that address conflicts between the demands of employment and...

    Families are changing. In 1975, two-thirds of American children had a stay-at-home parent. Today only about a quarter of children do (see Figure 1). Fully half now live with two parents who both work, while a quarter live with a single parent who works.

    Low-income families are changing too. Today most children in low-income families have working parents, like their more affluent peers. Only 38 percent of children in families with incomes below 200 percent of the poverty line have a stay-at-home parent; about a quarter live with two parents who both work, and 39 percent live with a single parent who works… 

    The challenges facing working families become more difficult during times of financial crisis and economic downturn, such as the United States is experiencing in 2009. As families change in turbulent economic times, family policies need to change, too. The prevention of child poverty in a context in which most low-income parents work but many have insufficient earnings requires (1) work-family policies that address conflicts between the demands of employment and the demands of caring for children; (2) income support policies that help parents supplement low incomes and cover periods out of work; and (3) policies that address the disproportionate risk of poverty faced by families with only one parent. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Wilson-Simmons, Reneé; Tyner, Artika; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2015

    On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr. Tyner discussed the Campaign for Prison Phone Justice, which explores the costs of prison phone calls, and how financial barriers to communication affect incarcerated individuals, their families, and communities. Dr. Tyner described how her research findings have helped promote community engagement and advance policy changes.

    This document includes the question and answer document from the Webinar. Listen to the recording, view the ...

    On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr. Tyner discussed the Campaign for Prison Phone Justice, which explores the costs of prison phone calls, and how financial barriers to communication affect incarcerated individuals, their families, and communities. Dr. Tyner described how her research findings have helped promote community engagement and advance policy changes.

    This document includes the question and answer document from the Webinar. Listen to the recording, view the PowerPoint presentation, and read the Transcript.

  • Individual Author: Wilson-Simmons, Reneé; Tyner, Artika; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2015

    On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr. Tyner discussed the Campaign for Prison Phone Justice, which explores the costs of prison phone calls, and how financial barriers to communication affect incarcerated individuals, their families, and communities. Dr. Tyner described how her research findings have helped promote community engagement and advance policy changes.

    This document includes the transcript from the Webinar. Listen to the recording, view the...

    On March 26, 2015 from 2:00-3:00pm EDT, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities, and Offenders Webinar, featuring SSRC Emerging Scholar Dr. Artika Tyner with Dr. Renée Wilson-Simmons as a discussant and Dr. Kristin Anderson Moore as moderator. This Webinar focused on the social and economic impacts of incarceration on children, families, communities, and offenders. Dr. Tyner discussed the Campaign for Prison Phone Justice, which explores the costs of prison phone calls, and how financial barriers to communication affect incarcerated individuals, their families, and communities. Dr. Tyner described how her research findings have helped promote community engagement and advance policy changes.

    This document includes the transcript from the Webinar. Listen to the recording, view the questions and answers, and browse the PowerPoint presentation.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1935 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations