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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Whitley, Sarah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haider, Steven J.; Bitler, Marianne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Considerable policy and academic attention has been focused on the topic of food deserts. We consider this topic from an economic perspective. First, we consider how the components of a standard economic analysis apply to the study of food deserts. Second, using this economic lens, we revisit the empirical literature on food deserts to assess the progress that has been made regarding whether food deserts are problematic in the U.S. Overall, despite several studies documenting the existence of food deserts in local areas, shortcomings in available data have not allowed researchers to convincingly document the presence or absence of food deserts on a national scale, and virtually no research has provided insight as to why food deserts might exist. (Author abstract) 

     

    Considerable policy and academic attention has been focused on the topic of food deserts. We consider this topic from an economic perspective. First, we consider how the components of a standard economic analysis apply to the study of food deserts. Second, using this economic lens, we revisit the empirical literature on food deserts to assess the progress that has been made regarding whether food deserts are problematic in the U.S. Overall, despite several studies documenting the existence of food deserts in local areas, shortcomings in available data have not allowed researchers to convincingly document the presence or absence of food deserts on a national scale, and virtually no research has provided insight as to why food deserts might exist. (Author abstract) 

     

  • Individual Author: Schupp, Justin
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    Participation in the local food movement has grown dramatically in the United States with the farmers’ market being one of its most widespread and heavily promoted forums (Gillespie 2007). Movement proponents have hailed this shift from “conventional” food production as a tactic that introduces more environmentally sustainable and socially just outcomes for society. In this light, proponents have argued that the interactions and transactions that occur at farmers’ markets benefit market participants, but, more importantly, have broader benefits for the neighborhoods they are located in and for society itself (Lyson 2007). Quite differently, research on food deserts, places that have limited to no access to the conventional food system and high levels of poverty, has documented these areas to be plagued by numerous social ills at both the individual and neighborhood level. For example, an extensive body of research has shown that the individuals living in these areas have diets that deviate substantially from what is considered to be nutritional and that neighborhoods, on average...

    Participation in the local food movement has grown dramatically in the United States with the farmers’ market being one of its most widespread and heavily promoted forums (Gillespie 2007). Movement proponents have hailed this shift from “conventional” food production as a tactic that introduces more environmentally sustainable and socially just outcomes for society. In this light, proponents have argued that the interactions and transactions that occur at farmers’ markets benefit market participants, but, more importantly, have broader benefits for the neighborhoods they are located in and for society itself (Lyson 2007). Quite differently, research on food deserts, places that have limited to no access to the conventional food system and high levels of poverty, has documented these areas to be plagued by numerous social ills at both the individual and neighborhood level. For example, an extensive body of research has shown that the individuals living in these areas have diets that deviate substantially from what is considered to be nutritional and that neighborhoods, on average, have worse health outcomes compared to neighborhoods not considered to be food desert. While the effects of living in a food desert are fairly well known, much less is known about the efforts to alleviate the situation. One such proscription that has been suggested to contribute to better food access in food deserts has been the previously mentioned local foods movement, particularly its farmers’ market tactic.

    The promise of benefits by the local food movement to society generally and to food deserts specifically raises several important questions, notably: where are farmers’ markets located and who has access to them? While the movements popularity and tactical development has been lauded in the media and academia, few works have examined farmers’ markets locations nationally and little evidence exists to systematically describe the neighborhoods they are in or the individuals that live close by. This dissertation begins this conversation by examining the efficacy of the farmers’ market, the flagship facet of the local foods movement, is at reaching its stated goals, particularly the cultivating the access for the democratization of food access. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Steele, Jack
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    Since the industrial revolution, the technological innovations of human society have created a rapidly growing separation between humans and the natural world. Nowhere is this separation so poignant as in the food system. The current industrialized model of global food production has effectively transformed access to fresh food into a privilege awarded to elite, rather than a right for all humans. The conjunction of a growing inequity in access to food resources worldwide and an industrial production system that disconnects the human psyche from the origins of food, leads to the systematic discrimination toward certain communities of people both in the United States and globally. This undergraduate environmental studies research thesis seeks to explore this inequity in the community of Fort Greene in Brooklyn, New York. It suggests the importance of understanding and increasing equity on a community level to help bridge the gap between socioeconomic status and race. Cooperation at all levels of food access, from production to distribution to consumption, is imperative in order to...

    Since the industrial revolution, the technological innovations of human society have created a rapidly growing separation between humans and the natural world. Nowhere is this separation so poignant as in the food system. The current industrialized model of global food production has effectively transformed access to fresh food into a privilege awarded to elite, rather than a right for all humans. The conjunction of a growing inequity in access to food resources worldwide and an industrial production system that disconnects the human psyche from the origins of food, leads to the systematic discrimination toward certain communities of people both in the United States and globally. This undergraduate environmental studies research thesis seeks to explore this inequity in the community of Fort Greene in Brooklyn, New York. It suggests the importance of understanding and increasing equity on a community level to help bridge the gap between socioeconomic status and race. Cooperation at all levels of food access, from production to distribution to consumption, is imperative in order to stray away from the industrial linear model of development. Using in-depth ethnographic interviews in conjunction with data and mapping analysis of consumption patterns within Fort Greene, this thesis will explore attitudes and preferences toward food distribution from a diverse group of citizens in order to gain an understanding of how perceptions differ across socioeconomic and racial lines. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bower, Kelly M.; Thorpe Jr., Roland J.; Rohde, Charles; Gaskin, Darrell J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Background Food store availability may determine the quality of food consumed by residents. Neighborhood racial residential segregation, poverty, and urbanicity independently affect food store availability, but the interactions among them have not been studied. Purpose To examine availability of supermarkets, grocery stores, and convenience stores in US census tracts according to neighborhood racial/ethnic composition, poverty, and urbanicity. Methods Data from 2000 US Census and 2001 InfoUSA food store data were combined and multivariate negative binomial regression models employed. Results As neighborhood poverty increased, supermarket availability decreased and grocery and convenience stores increased, regardless of race/ethnicity. At equal levels of poverty, Black census tracts had the fewest supermarkets, White tracts had the most, and integrated tracts were intermediate. Hispanic census tracts had the most grocery stores at all levels of poverty. In rural census tracts, neither racial composition nor level of poverty predicted supermarket availability. Conclusions...

    Background Food store availability may determine the quality of food consumed by residents. Neighborhood racial residential segregation, poverty, and urbanicity independently affect food store availability, but the interactions among them have not been studied. Purpose To examine availability of supermarkets, grocery stores, and convenience stores in US census tracts according to neighborhood racial/ethnic composition, poverty, and urbanicity. Methods Data from 2000 US Census and 2001 InfoUSA food store data were combined and multivariate negative binomial regression models employed. Results As neighborhood poverty increased, supermarket availability decreased and grocery and convenience stores increased, regardless of race/ethnicity. At equal levels of poverty, Black census tracts had the fewest supermarkets, White tracts had the most, and integrated tracts were intermediate. Hispanic census tracts had the most grocery stores at all levels of poverty. In rural census tracts, neither racial composition nor level of poverty predicted supermarket availability. Conclusions Neighborhood racial composition and neighborhood poverty are independently associated with food store availability. Poor predominantly Black neighborhoods face a double jeopardy with the most limited access to quality food and should be prioritized for interventions. These associations are not seen in rural areas which suggest that interventions should not be universal but developed locally. Keywords Food store availability; Neighborhood; Racial residential segregation; Concentrated poverty; Health disparity (author abstract)

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