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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Halpern, Ariel
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1999

    The federal and state governments have devoted considerable resources to strengthening child support enforcement over the last two decades, but the proportion of single mothers who receive child support has remained largely unchanged. In 1997, 31 percent of single-mother families received child support, a figure that is only slightly higher than it was 20 years earlier. Although this trend appears impervious to government efforts to increase child support, in fact, considerable progress has been made for certain subgroups of single mothers. This progress is masked by a shift in the marital status composition of single mothers, away from divorced and separated mothers toward never-married mothers, with the latter having a much lower rate of child support receipt than the former.

    Improvements in child support receipt rates for some subgroups of single mothers result, in part, from strengthened child support enforcement policies enacted since the 1970s. The child support provisions under the most recent round of welfare reform will likely perpetuate the upward trend in child...

    The federal and state governments have devoted considerable resources to strengthening child support enforcement over the last two decades, but the proportion of single mothers who receive child support has remained largely unchanged. In 1997, 31 percent of single-mother families received child support, a figure that is only slightly higher than it was 20 years earlier. Although this trend appears impervious to government efforts to increase child support, in fact, considerable progress has been made for certain subgroups of single mothers. This progress is masked by a shift in the marital status composition of single mothers, away from divorced and separated mothers toward never-married mothers, with the latter having a much lower rate of child support receipt than the former.

    Improvements in child support receipt rates for some subgroups of single mothers result, in part, from strengthened child support enforcement policies enacted since the 1970s. The child support provisions under the most recent round of welfare reform will likely perpetuate the upward trend in child support receipt rates for many single mothers. To the extent that fathers have the ability to pay child support, continued investment in the child support enforcement program will mean that even more single mothers will be able to count on child support in the future. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Spending positive time with both parents promotes child well-being and is associated with better child support outcomes. Unmarried parents do not have systematic access to assistance in establishing parenting time orders, so state and local child support programs have sought to address this service gap. This fact sheet highlights states and counties that coordinate the establishment of child support orders and parenting time agreements. Family violence safeguards are always a critical component when addressing parenting time. (author abstract)

    Spending positive time with both parents promotes child well-being and is associated with better child support outcomes. Unmarried parents do not have systematic access to assistance in establishing parenting time orders, so state and local child support programs have sought to address this service gap. This fact sheet highlights states and counties that coordinate the establishment of child support orders and parenting time agreements. Family violence safeguards are always a critical component when addressing parenting time. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pennsylvania University, National Center on Fathers and Families
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1998

    In December 1998, approximately 100 researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and other specialists in the field of fathers and families convened the Welfare Reform, Fathers, and Families roundtable to explore to potential of enabling services for low-income, noncustodial fathers in the context of welfare reform and child support enforcement. This report synthesizes the discussion of the themes of the meeting and their implications for policymaking, the directions they indicate for future research, and the lessons they impart for practice. The first section of this report describes the current and emerging issues in welfare reform, child support enforcement, and fatherhood initiatives. The second section explores the implications of the issues raised for policymaking. The third section offers new directions for research that arose from the discussion, and the fourth section describes lessons learned for practice. The report concludes with the roundtable agenda and a list of participants. (author abstract)

    In December 1998, approximately 100 researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and other specialists in the field of fathers and families convened the Welfare Reform, Fathers, and Families roundtable to explore to potential of enabling services for low-income, noncustodial fathers in the context of welfare reform and child support enforcement. This report synthesizes the discussion of the themes of the meeting and their implications for policymaking, the directions they indicate for future research, and the lessons they impart for practice. The first section of this report describes the current and emerging issues in welfare reform, child support enforcement, and fatherhood initiatives. The second section explores the implications of the issues raised for policymaking. The third section offers new directions for research that arose from the discussion, and the fourth section describes lessons learned for practice. The report concludes with the roundtable agenda and a list of participants. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Feeley, Theresa J.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    The correlation between a noncustodial father and child poverty suggests that father involvement and support are critical pieces of the puzzle for reducing child poverty. Regular child support provides an income supplement to families leaving welfare and can prevent families' initial descent into poverty. This issue brief is intended to introduce child advocates to the demographics of low-income fathers, the initiatives aimed at increasing their payment of child support, and the resources available to support these initiatives. The brief also provides a context for assessing the potential of these initiatives to improve the well-being of children. Many noncustodial fathers are not "deadbeat" but "deadbroke," with 35 percent of the nation's 9.5 million noncustodial fathers categorized as low-income. The brief summarizes findings from the Parents' Fair Share (PFS) demonstration program, which indicated it had few significant effects on the employment and earnings of low-income men, and therefore on increased child support. Despite disappointing results of this project, the brief...

    The correlation between a noncustodial father and child poverty suggests that father involvement and support are critical pieces of the puzzle for reducing child poverty. Regular child support provides an income supplement to families leaving welfare and can prevent families' initial descent into poverty. This issue brief is intended to introduce child advocates to the demographics of low-income fathers, the initiatives aimed at increasing their payment of child support, and the resources available to support these initiatives. The brief also provides a context for assessing the potential of these initiatives to improve the well-being of children. Many noncustodial fathers are not "deadbeat" but "deadbroke," with 35 percent of the nation's 9.5 million noncustodial fathers categorized as low-income. The brief summarizes findings from the Parents' Fair Share (PFS) demonstration program, which indicated it had few significant effects on the employment and earnings of low-income men, and therefore on increased child support. Despite disappointing results of this project, the brief suggests policy and program changes from current methods of child support enforcement. These changes include: (1) ensuring that child support orders and arrears are consistent with ability to pay; (2) increasing child support pass-throughs and disregards; (3) subsidizing child support payments; (4) providing employment-related services to low-income noncustodial parents; and (5) extending the Earned Income Tax Credit to noncustodial fathers. Lastly, the brief summarizes state and federal funding sources for initiatives intended to improve the ability of low-income noncustodial fathers to support their children financially. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    As a service member, or spouse or former spouse of one, you have unique child support needs.  All branches of the armed forces offer parenting programs and resources to strengthen military families.  This handbook supplements those resources by providing information you might need regarding paternity establishment, child support, access/visitation, and child custody.  First line supervisors and military commanders may also find this a handy addition to a leadership toolkit. (author abstract)

    As a service member, or spouse or former spouse of one, you have unique child support needs.  All branches of the armed forces offer parenting programs and resources to strengthen military families.  This handbook supplements those resources by providing information you might need regarding paternity establishment, child support, access/visitation, and child custody.  First line supervisors and military commanders may also find this a handy addition to a leadership toolkit. (author abstract)

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