Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lidman, Russell M.; Weeks, Gregory C.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2001

    Performance measures and policy research are integral to Washington’s WorkFirst program. We
    have learned that WorkFirst participants are working more and earning more, and they are
    exiting assistance more quickly than was the case under AFDC. We are learning the
    effectiveness of the various program elements, and how the offices throughout the state are
    doing. Regular program information and focused research have alerted us to program
    shortcomings and have guided us in developing remedies.
    We emphasize the word ‘guided.’ Information contributes to but is not a substitute for
    management decision making. WorkFirst is a complicated program, operating in scores of
    offices, with numerous contractors and with dozens of distinct program elements or options.
    (See Figure 4.) In principle and in time, we will know a great deal about the impacts of these
    components. However, in practice and in real time, decisions are made on the information
    available, together with projection, surmise and experience.
    One of the critical questions...

    Performance measures and policy research are integral to Washington’s WorkFirst program. We
    have learned that WorkFirst participants are working more and earning more, and they are
    exiting assistance more quickly than was the case under AFDC. We are learning the
    effectiveness of the various program elements, and how the offices throughout the state are
    doing. Regular program information and focused research have alerted us to program
    shortcomings and have guided us in developing remedies.
    We emphasize the word ‘guided.’ Information contributes to but is not a substitute for
    management decision making. WorkFirst is a complicated program, operating in scores of
    offices, with numerous contractors and with dozens of distinct program elements or options.
    (See Figure 4.) In principle and in time, we will know a great deal about the impacts of these
    components. However, in practice and in real time, decisions are made on the information
    available, together with projection, surmise and experience.
    One of the critical questions facing the program is how to assist participants in sustaining and
    advancing in their employment. Our review of the evidence suggests that we should invest in
    employment-related services and supports. This paper indicates how we arrived at this and some
    of the elements of this still-evolving strategy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Isaacs, Julia B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    As large numbers of recipients leave the welfare rolls, interest in their circumstances is widespread. Are individuals working? Are they and their families
    moving out of poverty? How are their children faring? Do they continue to need and receive assistance through other programs? To answer these questions, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), awarded $2.9 million in grants in
    fiscal year 1998 to fourteen states and large counties to track and monitor outcomes among families leaving welfare.1 Funded out of a special congressional appropriation, these grants were designed to collect data documenting what was happening to poor families after the sweeping changes in welfare legislation. This chapter provides an overview of the design of the ASPE-funded leavers studies and reviews major cross-study findings in three areas: employment, program participation, and household income. In each area, the chapter discusses how data from administrative records are enriched by the more detailed...

    As large numbers of recipients leave the welfare rolls, interest in their circumstances is widespread. Are individuals working? Are they and their families
    moving out of poverty? How are their children faring? Do they continue to need and receive assistance through other programs? To answer these questions, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), awarded $2.9 million in grants in
    fiscal year 1998 to fourteen states and large counties to track and monitor outcomes among families leaving welfare.1 Funded out of a special congressional appropriation, these grants were designed to collect data documenting what was happening to poor families after the sweeping changes in welfare legislation. This chapter provides an overview of the design of the ASPE-funded leavers studies and reviews major cross-study findings in three areas: employment, program participation, and household income. In each area, the chapter discusses how data from administrative records are enriched by the more detailed findings emerging from surveys of former recipients. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turnham, Jennifer; Cortes, Alvaro; Wood, Michelle; Berrien, Jenny
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    In February and March 2002, Abt Associates completed qualitative, in-person interviews with 75 individuals who are part of the evaluation of the Welfare to Work Voucher (WtWV) program. These interviews provide the first in-depth look at the experiences of WtW voucher recipients and the kinds of housing and employment choices these families have made since voucher issuance. The WtWV program was authorized by Congress in fiscal year 1999 and implemented in 131 public housing agencies (PHAs) beginning in December 1999. The program offered tenant-based rental assistance vouchers to current and former recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as well as families eligible for TANF. The purpose of the rental assistance is to help voucher recipients in their transition from welfare to economic self-sufficiency. (author introduction)

    In February and March 2002, Abt Associates completed qualitative, in-person interviews with 75 individuals who are part of the evaluation of the Welfare to Work Voucher (WtWV) program. These interviews provide the first in-depth look at the experiences of WtW voucher recipients and the kinds of housing and employment choices these families have made since voucher issuance. The WtWV program was authorized by Congress in fiscal year 1999 and implemented in 131 public housing agencies (PHAs) beginning in December 1999. The program offered tenant-based rental assistance vouchers to current and former recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as well as families eligible for TANF. The purpose of the rental assistance is to help voucher recipients in their transition from welfare to economic self-sufficiency. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan; Farrell, Mary; Fink, Barbara; Adams-Ciardullo, Diana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Few features of the 1990s welfare reforms have generated as much attention and controversy as time limits on benefit receipt. Time limits first emerged at the state level and subsequently became a central feature of federal welfare policy in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), which imposed a 60-month time limit on federally funded assistance for most families.

    To inform discussions about the reauthorization of PRWORA, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contracted with the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) to conduct a comprehensive review of what is known about time limits. The project included a survey of state welfare agencies (conducted for MDRC by The Lewin Group), site visits to examine the implementation of time limits, and a review of research on time limits.

    Though a simple idea, time limits raise a host of complex issues in practice. Many experts believe that time limits have played a key role in reshaping welfare, but the knowledge base about this key policy change is still...

    Few features of the 1990s welfare reforms have generated as much attention and controversy as time limits on benefit receipt. Time limits first emerged at the state level and subsequently became a central feature of federal welfare policy in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), which imposed a 60-month time limit on federally funded assistance for most families.

    To inform discussions about the reauthorization of PRWORA, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services contracted with the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) to conduct a comprehensive review of what is known about time limits. The project included a survey of state welfare agencies (conducted for MDRC by The Lewin Group), site visits to examine the implementation of time limits, and a review of research on time limits.

    Though a simple idea, time limits raise a host of complex issues in practice. Many experts believe that time limits have played a key role in reshaping welfare, but the knowledge base about this key policy change is still thin. Few families have reached the federal time limit, and it is too early to draw conclusions about how states will respond as more families reach limits or how families will fare without benefits over the long-term, in varying economic conditions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Snyder, Kathleen ; Bernstein, Sara ; Koralek, Robin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study. It is based on focus groups conducted in four locations in 2003 with current TANF participants and parents who had left TANF within the past year and were receiving child care subsidies. The report examines how these parents accessed and retained child care subsidies as they moved through and off welfare. However, it is important to note that this study did not examine the experiences of families that were not using subsidies. As a consequence, this study provides important information to help us better understand how these systems and polices work for families in the system, but it does not represent the perspectives...

    Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study. It is based on focus groups conducted in four locations in 2003 with current TANF participants and parents who had left TANF within the past year and were receiving child care subsidies. The report examines how these parents accessed and retained child care subsidies as they moved through and off welfare. However, it is important to note that this study did not examine the experiences of families that were not using subsidies. As a consequence, this study provides important information to help us better understand how these systems and polices work for families in the system, but it does not represent the perspectives of families that were unsuccessful in navigating these systems. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2006

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations