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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Launched in 2010, the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration evaluation from the Department of Health and Human Services and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration evaluation from the Department of Labor are studying 13 subsidized employment programs in 10 locations across the United States. The programs encompass three broad categories: Modified Transitional Jobs Models, Wage Subsidy Models, and Hybrid Models.

    The goal of these complementary large-scale projects is to evaluate the effectiveness of the latest generation of subsidized employment models that aim to improve participants’ long-term success in the labor market. This report introduces the projects and presents some preliminary findings about implementation of the demonstrations. (author abstract)

    Launched in 2010, the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration evaluation from the Department of Health and Human Services and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration evaluation from the Department of Labor are studying 13 subsidized employment programs in 10 locations across the United States. The programs encompass three broad categories: Modified Transitional Jobs Models, Wage Subsidy Models, and Hybrid Models.

    The goal of these complementary large-scale projects is to evaluate the effectiveness of the latest generation of subsidized employment models that aim to improve participants’ long-term success in the labor market. This report introduces the projects and presents some preliminary findings about implementation of the demonstrations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stromwall, Layne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    TANF’s main outcome goal of caseload reduction has resulted in a blanket attempt to reduce caseloads across all populations of TANF recipients, even though it is widely acknowledged that many TANF recipients may have significant barriers to employment. This study examined the mental health-related quality of life and related characteristics of female TANF recipients and nonrecipients, aged 18-40, receiving publicly funded mental health services to identify potential barriers to employment among TANF recipients in this group. TANF recipients reported significantly more distress and functional limitations related to their mental health than nonrecipients. This subgroup of TANF recipients is in need of specific attention from both the public welfare and mental health systems. The barriers to employment and the public policy goals of welfare reform related to this population are discussed. (author abstract) 

    TANF’s main outcome goal of caseload reduction has resulted in a blanket attempt to reduce caseloads across all populations of TANF recipients, even though it is widely acknowledged that many TANF recipients may have significant barriers to employment. This study examined the mental health-related quality of life and related characteristics of female TANF recipients and nonrecipients, aged 18-40, receiving publicly funded mental health services to identify potential barriers to employment among TANF recipients in this group. TANF recipients reported significantly more distress and functional limitations related to their mental health than nonrecipients. This subgroup of TANF recipients is in need of specific attention from both the public welfare and mental health systems. The barriers to employment and the public policy goals of welfare reform related to this population are discussed. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Holland, Deborah Evelyn
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    This study examined the issues of barriers and employment retention in a rural county welfare-to-work setting, the Missoula, Montana WoRC Program. Qualitative research (study one) was conducted, to interview clients regarding reasons why they had lost jobs in the past, and, to elicit their suggestions regarding new services the WoRC Program could offer to help with employment retention at future jobs. Study one results indicated that the primary barriers resulting in job loss were: family issues; medical problems; mental health disorders; work site difficulties; and other (i.e. boredom, attitude problems). Work adjustment proved to be an underlying barrier to employment retention. Study one results demonstrated that the clients wanted three primary services to help resolve barriers and improve job retention: life skills classes teaching work adjustment; job coaching; and post-TANF supportive services (i.e. clothing and gas vouchers). Quantitative research (study two) was conducted to analyze 90 variables via logistic regression and determine whether or not the WoRC Program...

    This study examined the issues of barriers and employment retention in a rural county welfare-to-work setting, the Missoula, Montana WoRC Program. Qualitative research (study one) was conducted, to interview clients regarding reasons why they had lost jobs in the past, and, to elicit their suggestions regarding new services the WoRC Program could offer to help with employment retention at future jobs. Study one results indicated that the primary barriers resulting in job loss were: family issues; medical problems; mental health disorders; work site difficulties; and other (i.e. boredom, attitude problems). Work adjustment proved to be an underlying barrier to employment retention. Study one results demonstrated that the clients wanted three primary services to help resolve barriers and improve job retention: life skills classes teaching work adjustment; job coaching; and post-TANF supportive services (i.e. clothing and gas vouchers). Quantitative research (study two) was conducted to analyze 90 variables via logistic regression and determine whether or not the WoRC Program assisted clients with gaining employment, and if so, what the characteristics of those clients were. The results of the logistic regression indicated that the WoRC Program helped clients gain employment exactly 50% of the time. Statistically significant variables for clients that gained employment were: study one participant; female; on TANF 4+ months; final status (case closed at time of study); merit (not sanctioned); no short term training months; no learning disability; no domestic violence; and no chemical dependency. Linear regression was utilized to determine whether or not the employment WoRC clients gained paid better than the minimum wage. The results of the linear regression demonstrated that the mean wage for the employed study two clients was $7.16/hr. The Federal minimum wage at the time of the study was $5.15/hr. To place this study in context, the literature review traced the development of the welfare system from ancient times to the present day, with special emphasis on the topics of cycling, barriers and retention, as well as intangible factors that may have contributed to the study results. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gurley, Tami; Bruce, Donald
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    We use four waves of a longitudinal survey of current and former welfare recipients in Tennessee to examine the effects of car access on employment, weekly hours of work, and hourly wages. Contributions include a focus on car access instead of ownership, treatment of urban and rural differences, and controls for the simultaneity of car access and employment outcomes. Results indicate that car access generally increases the probability of being employed and leaving welfare. Car access also leads to more hours of work for welfare recipients with a work requirement and enables participants to find better-paying jobs. (Author abstract)

    We use four waves of a longitudinal survey of current and former welfare recipients in Tennessee to examine the effects of car access on employment, weekly hours of work, and hourly wages. Contributions include a focus on car access instead of ownership, treatment of urban and rural differences, and controls for the simultaneity of car access and employment outcomes. Results indicate that car access generally increases the probability of being employed and leaving welfare. Car access also leads to more hours of work for welfare recipients with a work requirement and enables participants to find better-paying jobs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fraker, Thomas M.; Levy, Dan M.; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Hershey, Alan M.; Nightingale, Demetra S.; Olsen, Robert B.; Stapulonis, Rita A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This final report presents descriptive findings from Mathematica's study of enrollees during the two years after they entered a welfare-to-work program. Most were TANF recipients with significant barriers to employment; although most were employed at some time during the study, many faced employment problems at the end of that period, and the jobs they held often left them in poverty. Whether a more comprehensive approach would produce better results is unclear, but the report presents design and implementation factors for programs to consider. (Author abstract)

    This final report presents descriptive findings from Mathematica's study of enrollees during the two years after they entered a welfare-to-work program. Most were TANF recipients with significant barriers to employment; although most were employed at some time during the study, many faced employment problems at the end of that period, and the jobs they held often left them in poverty. Whether a more comprehensive approach would produce better results is unclear, but the report presents design and implementation factors for programs to consider. (Author abstract)

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