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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sullivan, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The research surrounding welfare-to-work programs suggests a number of potential factors that mediate welfare dependency including a person’s emotional well-being. This study explored how emotional well-being measures of TANF recipients are related to current job type. Findings indicate perceived control self-efficacy and self-esteem were significantly correlated with jobs that paid more than minimum wage. This may suggest feelings of mastery and competence may be precursors to better paying jobs. Many other emotional well-being variables including depression, happiness, life satisfaction, and optimism were not associated with earning levels from employment. Policy recommendations are offered based on current and previous findings. (author abstract)

    The research surrounding welfare-to-work programs suggests a number of potential factors that mediate welfare dependency including a person’s emotional well-being. This study explored how emotional well-being measures of TANF recipients are related to current job type. Findings indicate perceived control self-efficacy and self-esteem were significantly correlated with jobs that paid more than minimum wage. This may suggest feelings of mastery and competence may be precursors to better paying jobs. Many other emotional well-being variables including depression, happiness, life satisfaction, and optimism were not associated with earning levels from employment. Policy recommendations are offered based on current and previous findings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Evans-Campbell, Teresa
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Over multiple generations, American Indian communities have endured a succession of traumatic events that have long-term consequences for community members. This article presents a multilevel framework for exploring the impact of historically traumatic events on individuals, families, and communities. The critical connection between historically traumatic events and contemporary stressors is also discussed at length. (author abstract)

    Over multiple generations, American Indian communities have endured a succession of traumatic events that have long-term consequences for community members. This article presents a multilevel framework for exploring the impact of historically traumatic events on individuals, families, and communities. The critical connection between historically traumatic events and contemporary stressors is also discussed at length. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nestor, Bridget A.; Cheek, Shayna M.; Liu, Richard T.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Background: This study examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health treatment utilization for suicidal ideation and behavior in a nationally representative sample of adolescents.

    Method: Data were drawn from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Participants included 4176 depressed adolescents with suicidal ideation and behavior in the previous year. Weighted logistic regressions were estimated to examine whether adolescent racial/ethnic minorities had lower rates of past-year treatment for suicidal ideation and behavior in inpatient or outpatient settings, while adjusting for age, depressive symptom severity, family income, and health insurance status.

    Results: Among adolescents with any suicidal ideation and behavior, and suicide attempts specifically, non-Hispanic blacks and Native Americans were less likely than whites to receive outpatient treatment, and multiracial adolescents were less likely to be admitted to inpatient facilities. Apart from Hispanics, racial/ethnic minorities were generally less likely to receive...

    Background: This study examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health treatment utilization for suicidal ideation and behavior in a nationally representative sample of adolescents.

    Method: Data were drawn from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Participants included 4176 depressed adolescents with suicidal ideation and behavior in the previous year. Weighted logistic regressions were estimated to examine whether adolescent racial/ethnic minorities had lower rates of past-year treatment for suicidal ideation and behavior in inpatient or outpatient settings, while adjusting for age, depressive symptom severity, family income, and health insurance status.

    Results: Among adolescents with any suicidal ideation and behavior, and suicide attempts specifically, non-Hispanic blacks and Native Americans were less likely than whites to receive outpatient treatment, and multiracial adolescents were less likely to be admitted to inpatient facilities. Apart from Hispanics, racial/ethnic minorities were generally less likely to receive mental health care for suicidal ideation, particularly within psychiatric outpatient settings. A pattern emerged with racial/ethnic differences in treatment receipt being greatest for adolescents with the least severe suicidal ideation and behavior.

    Limitations: The cross-sectional data limits our ability to form causal inferences.

    Conclusion: Strikingly low rates of treatment utilization for suicidal ideation and behavior were observed across all racial/ethnic groups. Certain racial/ethnic minorities may be less likely to seek treatment for suicidal ideation and behavior when symptoms are less severe, with this gap in treatment use narrowing as symptom severity increases. Native Americans were among the racial/ethnic groups with lowest treatment utilization, but also among the highest for rates of suicide attempts, highlighting the pressing need for strategies to increase mental health service use in this particularly vulnerable population. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lee, Eunju; Clarkson-Hendrix, Michael; Lee, Yeonggeul
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Informal kinship caregivers provide the majority of out of home care to children who can no longer safely stay with their biological parent. Yet their parenting challenges are understudied since they are often left out from child welfare and other service systems. This mixed methods study, using a survey and focus groups of grandparent and other kin, examined predictors and sources of parenting stress. Quantitative findings suggested that the kinship family's needs and the caregiver's health and emotional well-being adversely affected parenting stress. Grandparent caregivers experienced an elevated level of parenting stress compared to other kin caregivers. Qualitative findings suggested that financial strains, concerns over children's behavior, navigating service systems and difficult relationships with birth parents contributed to their stress. It appeared that grandparent caregivers faced special challenges due to generational gaps, guilt and concerns over birth parents. (Author abstract) 

    Informal kinship caregivers provide the majority of out of home care to children who can no longer safely stay with their biological parent. Yet their parenting challenges are understudied since they are often left out from child welfare and other service systems. This mixed methods study, using a survey and focus groups of grandparent and other kin, examined predictors and sources of parenting stress. Quantitative findings suggested that the kinship family's needs and the caregiver's health and emotional well-being adversely affected parenting stress. Grandparent caregivers experienced an elevated level of parenting stress compared to other kin caregivers. Qualitative findings suggested that financial strains, concerns over children's behavior, navigating service systems and difficult relationships with birth parents contributed to their stress. It appeared that grandparent caregivers faced special challenges due to generational gaps, guilt and concerns over birth parents. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Joyce, Kristen ; McConnell, Sheena
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    New research has led policymakers and researchers to argue that some people might not achieve economic independence in part because of difficulty applying the self-regulation skills needed to get, keep, and advance in a job (Pavetti 2018; Cavadel et al. 2017). These self-regulation skills—sometimes referred to as soft skills or executive functioning skills—include the ability to finish tasks, stay organized, and control emotions. Evidence suggests that facing poverty, and the multiple stresses that accompany it, can make it particularly difficult to develop and use self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). However, research indicates that interventions can strengthen these important skills (Kautz et al. 2014).

    Based on the potential link between self-regulation skills and successful employment outcomes for low-income people, some employment programs, including some offered as part of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, pair program participants with coaches (Derr et al. 2018; Pavetti 2014; Ruiz De Luzuriaga 2015; Dechausay 2018). The...

    New research has led policymakers and researchers to argue that some people might not achieve economic independence in part because of difficulty applying the self-regulation skills needed to get, keep, and advance in a job (Pavetti 2018; Cavadel et al. 2017). These self-regulation skills—sometimes referred to as soft skills or executive functioning skills—include the ability to finish tasks, stay organized, and control emotions. Evidence suggests that facing poverty, and the multiple stresses that accompany it, can make it particularly difficult to develop and use self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). However, research indicates that interventions can strengthen these important skills (Kautz et al. 2014).

    Based on the potential link between self-regulation skills and successful employment outcomes for low-income people, some employment programs, including some offered as part of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, pair program participants with coaches (Derr et al. 2018; Pavetti 2014; Ruiz De Luzuriaga 2015; Dechausay 2018). The coaches work with participants to set individualized goals and provide motivation, support, and feedback as the participants pursue their goals. The coaches aim to help the participants use and strengthen their self-regulation skills, succeed in the labor market, and move toward economic security. To assess whether coaching can improve employment outcomes for low-income people, the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation is currently sponsoring the Evaluation of Employment Coaching for TANF and Related Populations. (Author abstract) 

     

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