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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Idala, David; Roddy, Tricia; Milligan, Charles; Sommers, Anna; Boddie-Willis, Cynthia; Clark, Angela; Dorn, Stan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Facing limited outreach funding and having exhausted conventional outreach methods, states are searching for new, more efficient ways to identify and enroll uninsured children who are eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. Several pioneer states—Iowa, New Jersey, and Maryland—have begun to use adjusted gross income (AGI) and other data from tax forms as an innovative way to build upon more traditional outreach efforts. All three of these states enacted legislation in 2008 asking parents to identify uninsured children on state income tax forms and required Medicaid and CHIP outreach accordingly. The extent to which these states succeed in linking tax information to increase participation of eligible children in public health insurance programs will determine whether—and how—other states seeking to enroll more uninsured children should adopt this practice in either its original or modified form. This issue brief highlights Maryland’s early efforts to use income tax returns to identify potentially eligible—but unenrolled—children. It examines the benefits and drawbacks of this strategy as well...

    Facing limited outreach funding and having exhausted conventional outreach methods, states are searching for new, more efficient ways to identify and enroll uninsured children who are eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. Several pioneer states—Iowa, New Jersey, and Maryland—have begun to use adjusted gross income (AGI) and other data from tax forms as an innovative way to build upon more traditional outreach efforts. All three of these states enacted legislation in 2008 asking parents to identify uninsured children on state income tax forms and required Medicaid and CHIP outreach accordingly. The extent to which these states succeed in linking tax information to increase participation of eligible children in public health insurance programs will determine whether—and how—other states seeking to enroll more uninsured children should adopt this practice in either its original or modified form. This issue brief highlights Maryland’s early efforts to use income tax returns to identify potentially eligible—but unenrolled—children. It examines the benefits and drawbacks of this strategy as well as mechanisms for maximizing its effectiveness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Abdus, Salam; Hudson, Julie; Hill, Steven C.; Selden, Thomas M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Both Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which are run by the states and funded by federal and state dollars, offer health insurance coverage for low-income children. Thirty-three states charged premiums for children at some income ranges in CHIP or Medicaid in 2013. Using data from the 1999–2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we show that the relationship between premiums and coverage varies considerably by income level and by parental access to employer-sponsored insurance. Among children with family incomes above 150 percent of the federal poverty level, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 1.6-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance may be higher among those children whose parents lack an offer of employer-sponsored insurance than among those whose parents have such an offer. Among children with family incomes of 101–150 percent of poverty, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 6.7-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage and a 3....

    Both Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which are run by the states and funded by federal and state dollars, offer health insurance coverage for low-income children. Thirty-three states charged premiums for children at some income ranges in CHIP or Medicaid in 2013. Using data from the 1999–2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we show that the relationship between premiums and coverage varies considerably by income level and by parental access to employer-sponsored insurance. Among children with family incomes above 150 percent of the federal poverty level, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 1.6-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance may be higher among those children whose parents lack an offer of employer-sponsored insurance than among those whose parents have such an offer. Among children with family incomes of 101–150 percent of poverty, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 6.7-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage and a 3.3-percentage-point increase in uninsurance. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance is even larger among children whose parents lack offers of employer coverage. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pei, Zhuan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Conventional labor supply studies assume constant eligibility monitoring of income-tested program participants, but this is not true for most programs. For example, states can allow children to enroll in Medicaid/CHIP for 12 months regardless of family income changes. A long recertification period reduces monitoring costs but is predicted to induce program participation by temporary income adjustments. However, I find little evidence of strategic behavior from the 2001 and 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation. Given the lack of dynamic responses, I propose a framework to compute the optimal recertification period and find 12 months to be its lower bound. (Author abstract)

    Conventional labor supply studies assume constant eligibility monitoring of income-tested program participants, but this is not true for most programs. For example, states can allow children to enroll in Medicaid/CHIP for 12 months regardless of family income changes. A long recertification period reduces monitoring costs but is predicted to induce program participation by temporary income adjustments. However, I find little evidence of strategic behavior from the 2001 and 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation. Given the lack of dynamic responses, I propose a framework to compute the optimal recertification period and find 12 months to be its lower bound. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ku, Leighton; Ferguson, Christine
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its...

    This report briefly reviews the evidence about the effectiveness of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in addressing the health and financial needs of vulnerable Americans, including children and other vulnerable populations, including low-income parents, pregnant women, seniors and people with disabilities. The importance of Medicaid and CHIP to low-income children and adults is well understood; less evident is the extent to which Medicaid and CHIP protect populations with serious health problems. Children covered by Medicaid or CHIP are more likely than their privately-insured counterparts to be in poorer health status and to have serious health conditions, as are publicly-insured adults. Almost all elderly Americans are covered by Medicare, but low-income seniors who are also enrolled in Medicaid (sometimes called dual eligibles) tend to have substantially worse health than those with Medicare alone or with private coverage. The benefit structure of Medicaid is particularly designed to help address the serious health needs and low incomes of its beneficiaries. Children covered by Medicaid have comprehensive services under its Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment policies.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Camillo, Cheryl
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In this SHARE brief, Mathematica Senior Researcher, Cheryl Camillo, evaluates the Medicaid and CHIP eligibility changes that states will need to implement under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), identifying the most salient issues that states will need to consider in order to ensure that the new eligibility determination and renewal processes for these programs are effective.  The analysis is funded through a SHARE grant led by Mathematica's Dr. John Czajka and is the first in a series of three briefs titled "Eligibility Determination Using Modified Adjusted Gross Income: Implications for Enrollment under Health Reform." (author abstract)

    In this SHARE brief, Mathematica Senior Researcher, Cheryl Camillo, evaluates the Medicaid and CHIP eligibility changes that states will need to implement under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), identifying the most salient issues that states will need to consider in order to ensure that the new eligibility determination and renewal processes for these programs are effective.  The analysis is funded through a SHARE grant led by Mathematica's Dr. John Czajka and is the first in a series of three briefs titled "Eligibility Determination Using Modified Adjusted Gross Income: Implications for Enrollment under Health Reform." (author abstract)

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