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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Magnuson, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Early childhood is an important, but contested, topic of research related to the production of human capital, and the only period of childhood and adolescence with relatively little public investment. Some scholars interpret the early childhood intervention evidence as showing promising opportunities for addressing inequities in human capital, and consequently argue for significant expansion of public investment. Other scholars come to more cautious or even negative conclusions, worrying particularly about the degree of risk and uncertainty in current evidence regarding longterm payoffs to early childhood investments. In this article, we review the evidence on the potential of early childhood investments, particularly center-based early childhood education, to reduce economic inequality. (author introduction)

    Early childhood is an important, but contested, topic of research related to the production of human capital, and the only period of childhood and adolescence with relatively little public investment. Some scholars interpret the early childhood intervention evidence as showing promising opportunities for addressing inequities in human capital, and consequently argue for significant expansion of public investment. Other scholars come to more cautious or even negative conclusions, worrying particularly about the degree of risk and uncertainty in current evidence regarding longterm payoffs to early childhood investments. In this article, we review the evidence on the potential of early childhood investments, particularly center-based early childhood education, to reduce economic inequality. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Brown, Courtney M.; Girio-Herrera, Erin L.; Sherman, Susan N.; Kahn, Robert S.; Copeland, Kristen A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians promote early childhood education (ECE). However, pediatricians have met resistance from low-income parents when providing anticipatory guidance on some topics outside the realm of physical health. Parents’ views on discussing ECE with the pediatrician have not been studied. We sought to understand low-income parents’ experiences and attitudes with regard to discussing ECE with the pediatrician and to identify opportunities for pediatrician input. We conducted 27 in-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews with parents of 3- and 4-year-old patients (100% Medicaid, 78% African American) at an urban primary care center. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for themes by a multidisciplinary team. Most low-income parents in our study reported they primarily sought ECE advice from family and friends but were open to talking about ECE with the pediatrician. They considered their children’s individual behavior and development to be important factors in ECE decisions and appreciated...

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians promote early childhood education (ECE). However, pediatricians have met resistance from low-income parents when providing anticipatory guidance on some topics outside the realm of physical health. Parents’ views on discussing ECE with the pediatrician have not been studied. We sought to understand low-income parents’ experiences and attitudes with regard to discussing ECE with the pediatrician and to identify opportunities for pediatrician input. We conducted 27 in-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews with parents of 3- and 4-year-old patients (100% Medicaid, 78% African American) at an urban primary care center. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for themes by a multidisciplinary team. Most low-income parents in our study reported they primarily sought ECE advice from family and friends but were open to talking about ECE with the pediatrician. They considered their children’s individual behavior and development to be important factors in ECE decisions and appreciated pediatricians’ advice about developmental readiness for ECE. Participants’ decisions about ECE were often driven by fears that their children would be abused or neglected. Many viewed 3 years as the age at which children had sufficient language skills to report mistreatment and could be safely enrolled in ECE. Participants were generally accepting of discussions about ECE during well child visits. There may be opportunity for the pediatrician to frame ECE discussions in the context of development, behavior, and safety and to promote high-quality ECE at an earlier age. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brandon, Richard; Abe, Yasuyo; Kim, Hui; Datta, A. Rupa; Milesi, Carolina; Goerge, Robert; Forry, Nicole; Gennetian, Lisa; Witte, Ann; Zanoni, Wladimir
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    What did the early childhood teaching and caregiving workforce look like in 2012? This research brief describes the Early Care and Education (ECE) workforce data developed in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The survey focuses on individuals providing direct care and education for children birth through five years and not yet in kindergarten. Findings are based on over 10,000 questionnaires completed in 2012 by a sample of individuals representing about one million center-based classroom staff, as well as about one million paid and about 2.7 million unpaid individuals regularly providing home-based ECE to children other than their own. (author abstract)

    What did the early childhood teaching and caregiving workforce look like in 2012? This research brief describes the Early Care and Education (ECE) workforce data developed in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The survey focuses on individuals providing direct care and education for children birth through five years and not yet in kindergarten. Findings are based on over 10,000 questionnaires completed in 2012 by a sample of individuals representing about one million center-based classroom staff, as well as about one million paid and about 2.7 million unpaid individuals regularly providing home-based ECE to children other than their own. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zepeda, Marlene; Castro, Dina C.; Cronin, Sharon
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Teacher preparation is clearly linked to the quality of early childhood programs. In order for young dual language learners (DLLs) to be academically successful, teacher preparation should focus on those skills and abilities relevant to students’ particular needs. This article reviews the content of professional preparation for early educators working with young DLLs and briefly discusses the importance of developing the cultural and linguistic diversity of the early childhood workforce. It identifies 6 content areas: (a) understanding language development, (b) understanding the relationship between language and culture, (c) developing skills and abilities to effectively teach DLLs, (d) developing abilities to use assessment in meaningful ways for DLLs, (e) developing a sense of professionalism, and (f) understanding how to work with families. (Author abstract)

    Teacher preparation is clearly linked to the quality of early childhood programs. In order for young dual language learners (DLLs) to be academically successful, teacher preparation should focus on those skills and abilities relevant to students’ particular needs. This article reviews the content of professional preparation for early educators working with young DLLs and briefly discusses the importance of developing the cultural and linguistic diversity of the early childhood workforce. It identifies 6 content areas: (a) understanding language development, (b) understanding the relationship between language and culture, (c) developing skills and abilities to effectively teach DLLs, (d) developing abilities to use assessment in meaningful ways for DLLs, (e) developing a sense of professionalism, and (f) understanding how to work with families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: RWJF Commission to Build a Healthier America
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Social and economic disadvantages experienced in early childhood can limit children’s opportunities for health throughout life. These health disadvantages may then be passed across generations. In addition, research shows that early exposure to toxic stress—traumatic experiences such as neglect, abuse, or homelessness—can rewire a child’s brain, with serious health consequences extending into adulthood. Intervening in early childhood can break the vicious cycle of social and health disadvantage into adulthood and across generations.

    This fact sheet reviews key elements of successful early childhood programs, estimated savings to society, and known risks of failing to invest in early childhood development. (author abstract)

    Social and economic disadvantages experienced in early childhood can limit children’s opportunities for health throughout life. These health disadvantages may then be passed across generations. In addition, research shows that early exposure to toxic stress—traumatic experiences such as neglect, abuse, or homelessness—can rewire a child’s brain, with serious health consequences extending into adulthood. Intervening in early childhood can break the vicious cycle of social and health disadvantage into adulthood and across generations.

    This fact sheet reviews key elements of successful early childhood programs, estimated savings to society, and known risks of failing to invest in early childhood development. (author abstract)

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