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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Hetling-Wenyj, Andrea; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The purpose of today’s report and the others in the series is to examine holistically the implementation and program practices of the FVO in Maryland. Today’s report describes the prevalence and correlates of domestic violence in the state’s TANF caseload. The paper answers the question of whether female TCA recipients who have experienced domestic violence, and especially those who hold a waiver under the FVO, differ from other female TCA customers either on baseline or outcome characteristics. (author abstract)

    The purpose of today’s report and the others in the series is to examine holistically the implementation and program practices of the FVO in Maryland. Today’s report describes the prevalence and correlates of domestic violence in the state’s TANF caseload. The paper answers the question of whether female TCA recipients who have experienced domestic violence, and especially those who hold a waiver under the FVO, differ from other female TCA customers either on baseline or outcome characteristics. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hetling-Wernyj, Andrea; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report, the second in a series of three arising from a multi-stage project on domestic violence and welfare reform in Maryland, focuses on implementation of the Family Violence Option (FVO) in local Departments of Social Services (DSS) and inter-jurisdictional variation in practices and services. The project as a whole examines the impact of the FVO by combining quantitative and qualitative research methods to investigate the interaction among individual, agency, and jurisdictional variables. The purpose is to generate information that is useful to policy reform and the development of best practices. The present report, Domestic Violence and Welfare Receipt in Maryland: How is the Family Violence Option being Implemented?, describes and analyzes data gathered through interviews conducted with welfare program personnel in each of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions. The availability of domestic violence services and the general economic and social climate in each of the jurisdictions is also discussed. The conclusion focuses on the importance of local implementation and FVO practices...

    This report, the second in a series of three arising from a multi-stage project on domestic violence and welfare reform in Maryland, focuses on implementation of the Family Violence Option (FVO) in local Departments of Social Services (DSS) and inter-jurisdictional variation in practices and services. The project as a whole examines the impact of the FVO by combining quantitative and qualitative research methods to investigate the interaction among individual, agency, and jurisdictional variables. The purpose is to generate information that is useful to policy reform and the development of best practices. The present report, Domestic Violence and Welfare Receipt in Maryland: How is the Family Violence Option being Implemented?, describes and analyzes data gathered through interviews conducted with welfare program personnel in each of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions. The availability of domestic violence services and the general economic and social climate in each of the jurisdictions is also discussed. The conclusion focuses on the importance of local implementation and FVO practices as well as how certain local economic and demographic conditions might impact FVO implementation and service delivery. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hetling, Andrea; Saunders, Correne; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This paper examines the characteristics of the sample of Maryland welfare recipients from June 2002 who, during a telephone survey, disclosed domestic violence to the research interviewer. Using administrative records of the sample members, this project compares demographic characteristics and reported barriers of three groups of women: individuals who disclosed domestic violence to the survey researchers; those who also disclosed to their caseworkers; and those who disclosed to their caseworker but not to surveyors. Those who did not disclose domestic violence to either are included as a comparison group. The purpose of the analyses was to decipher whom welfare caseworkers are reaching and assist in identifying possible sub-groups of “missing” victims. In other words, the specific aim was to ascertain any characteristics common to welfare recipients who have experienced domestic violence but do not disclose the abuse to their welfare caseworker in order to determine if this group differs from victims who do disclose to caseworkers. Identification of these “risk” characteristics...

    This paper examines the characteristics of the sample of Maryland welfare recipients from June 2002 who, during a telephone survey, disclosed domestic violence to the research interviewer. Using administrative records of the sample members, this project compares demographic characteristics and reported barriers of three groups of women: individuals who disclosed domestic violence to the survey researchers; those who also disclosed to their caseworkers; and those who disclosed to their caseworker but not to surveyors. Those who did not disclose domestic violence to either are included as a comparison group. The purpose of the analyses was to decipher whom welfare caseworkers are reaching and assist in identifying possible sub-groups of “missing” victims. In other words, the specific aim was to ascertain any characteristics common to welfare recipients who have experienced domestic violence but do not disclose the abuse to their welfare caseworker in order to determine if this group differs from victims who do disclose to caseworkers. Identification of these “risk” characteristics could aid in designing improvements to domestic violence screening methods in welfare offices and, ultimately, in helping to insure that the full promise of the Family Violence Option in particular and welfare reform in general is realized for women who have experienced domestic violence. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lloyd, Susan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    This article presents some results of a random household survey that examined the effects of domestic violence on the labor force participation of 824 women living in a low-income neighborhood. It also uses data from twenty-four long interviews.

    Eighteen percent of the respondents reported having experienced physical aggression in the past twelve months, and 11.9% reported more severe physical violence. Women who reported abuse were more likely to have experienced unemployment and held more jobs and to report more health problems. They also had lower personal incomes, and were significantly more likely to receive public assistance. At the same time, women who reported abuse were employed in roughly the same numbers as those who did not. Thus, it appears that domestic violence may depress women’s socioeconomic and occupational status attainment over time, but does not affect employment status per se. The article concludes with comments about the implications of the findings for the redesign of public assistance and job training programs. (author abstract)

    This article presents some results of a random household survey that examined the effects of domestic violence on the labor force participation of 824 women living in a low-income neighborhood. It also uses data from twenty-four long interviews.

    Eighteen percent of the respondents reported having experienced physical aggression in the past twelve months, and 11.9% reported more severe physical violence. Women who reported abuse were more likely to have experienced unemployment and held more jobs and to report more health problems. They also had lower personal incomes, and were significantly more likely to receive public assistance. At the same time, women who reported abuse were employed in roughly the same numbers as those who did not. Thus, it appears that domestic violence may depress women’s socioeconomic and occupational status attainment over time, but does not affect employment status per se. The article concludes with comments about the implications of the findings for the redesign of public assistance and job training programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hetling, Andrea H.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This paper describes the connection between domestic violence and welfare receipt with a focus on the potential impact of the new welfare program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), and one of its amendments, the Family Violence Option (FVO), on domestic violence victims. For women experiencing both poverty and violence, welfare is often the common means of escape and the common path to self-sufficiency. This paper first looks into current research documenting and explaining the overlap between the populations of domestic violence victims and welfare recipients. Secondly, it examines the potential ability of welfare programs to meet the special needs of domestic violence victims, thus having a great impact on the ability of women to escape violent relationships and to become financially self-sufficient. The author contends that ignoring this connection between domestic violence and poverty would not only endanger women and children, but also guarantee the failure of welfare-to-work programs for a significant portion of recipients. (author abstract)

    This paper describes the connection between domestic violence and welfare receipt with a focus on the potential impact of the new welfare program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), and one of its amendments, the Family Violence Option (FVO), on domestic violence victims. For women experiencing both poverty and violence, welfare is often the common means of escape and the common path to self-sufficiency. This paper first looks into current research documenting and explaining the overlap between the populations of domestic violence victims and welfare recipients. Secondly, it examines the potential ability of welfare programs to meet the special needs of domestic violence victims, thus having a great impact on the ability of women to escape violent relationships and to become financially self-sufficient. The author contends that ignoring this connection between domestic violence and poverty would not only endanger women and children, but also guarantee the failure of welfare-to-work programs for a significant portion of recipients. (author abstract)

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