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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Author: Kenney, Genevieve M.; Ruhter, Joel; Selden, Thomas M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The current health reform debate is greatly concerned with “bending the curve” of cost growth and containing costs, particularly in public programs. Our research demonstrates that spending in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is highly concentrated, particularly among children with chronic health problems. Ten percent of enrollees (two-thirds of whom have a chronic condition) account for 72 percent of the spending; 30 percent of enrolled children receive little or no care. These results highlight the importance of cost containment strategies that reduce avoidable hospitalizations among children with chronic problems and policies that increase preventive care, particularly among African American children. (author abstract)

    The current health reform debate is greatly concerned with “bending the curve” of cost growth and containing costs, particularly in public programs. Our research demonstrates that spending in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is highly concentrated, particularly among children with chronic health problems. Ten percent of enrollees (two-thirds of whom have a chronic condition) account for 72 percent of the spending; 30 percent of enrolled children receive little or no care. These results highlight the importance of cost containment strategies that reduce avoidable hospitalizations among children with chronic problems and policies that increase preventive care, particularly among African American children. (author abstract)

  • Author: Wise, Paul H.; Wampler, Nina S.; Chavkin, Wendy; Romero, Diana
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    Objectives. This study assessed chronic child illness among recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits and poor families not receiving benefits.

    Methods. Data from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey were used to examine chronic child illness, enrollment in TANF, health insurance status, and selected access indicators.

    Results. One quarter of TANF-enrolled children had chronic illnesses. Unenrolled children were 3 times as likely as TANF-enrolled children to be uninsured. Among the chronically ill, 31.7% of unenrolled and 14.3% of enrolled children experienced gaps in insurance coverage that were associated with access barriers.

    Conclusions. Welfare policies should consider the effects of chronic illness and gaps in insurance coverage on the health of poor children. (Author abstract)

    Objectives. This study assessed chronic child illness among recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits and poor families not receiving benefits.

    Methods. Data from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey were used to examine chronic child illness, enrollment in TANF, health insurance status, and selected access indicators.

    Results. One quarter of TANF-enrolled children had chronic illnesses. Unenrolled children were 3 times as likely as TANF-enrolled children to be uninsured. Among the chronically ill, 31.7% of unenrolled and 14.3% of enrolled children experienced gaps in insurance coverage that were associated with access barriers.

    Conclusions. Welfare policies should consider the effects of chronic illness and gaps in insurance coverage on the health of poor children. (Author abstract)

  • Author: Kneipp, Shawn M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop discusses the negative impact of chronic disease and poor worker health on lower-wage workers. The presentation goes on to describe a randomized control trial which aims to test the effects of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) on employment and health outcomes among lower-wage working adults 40-64 years of age at 6 and 12 months from baseline, and explore the extent to which they are modified by select sociodemographic, chronic condition, and work-related factors.

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop discusses the negative impact of chronic disease and poor worker health on lower-wage workers. The presentation goes on to describe a randomized control trial which aims to test the effects of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) on employment and health outcomes among lower-wage working adults 40-64 years of age at 6 and 12 months from baseline, and explore the extent to which they are modified by select sociodemographic, chronic condition, and work-related factors.

  • Author: Shiue, Ivy; Bramley, Glen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Housing conditions affect occupants continuously, and health interventions have shown a positive association between housing investment or improvement and occupant's health. However, the sources of the housing problems were less understood. Since it was observed that lead dust and chloroanisoles released from housing (materials) as indoor pollutants affected child's health, we now aimed to examine the relationships among built year, environmental chemicals and individual health in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, including demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health status, biomarkers and blood and urinary chemical concentrations. Adults aged 20 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 5,793). Analysis involved chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted general linear regression and logistic regression modelling. People who resided in older housing built before 1990 tended to report chronic bronchitis, liver problems, stroke, heart failure...

    Housing conditions affect occupants continuously, and health interventions have shown a positive association between housing investment or improvement and occupant's health. However, the sources of the housing problems were less understood. Since it was observed that lead dust and chloroanisoles released from housing (materials) as indoor pollutants affected child's health, we now aimed to examine the relationships among built year, environmental chemicals and individual health in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, including demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health status, biomarkers and blood and urinary chemical concentrations. Adults aged 20 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 5,793). Analysis involved chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted general linear regression and logistic regression modelling. People who resided in older housing built before 1990 tended to report chronic bronchitis, liver problems, stroke, heart failure, diabetes, asthma and emphysema. Higher values in HDL cholesterol, blood lead and blood cadmium and having positive responses of hepatitis A, B, C and E antibodies among occupants were also observed. Furthermore, higher environmental chemical concentrations related to old housing including urinary cadmium, cobalt, platinum, mercury, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol concentrations and mono-cyclohexyl phthalate and mono-isobutyl phthalate metabolites were shown in occupants as well. Older housing (≥30 years) seemed to contribute to the amount of environmental chemicals that affected human health. Regular monitoring, upgrading and renovation of housing to remove environmental chemicals and policy to support people in deprived situations against environmental injustice would be needed. (Author abstract) 

      

  • Author: Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Rehkopf, David H.; Subramanian, S. V.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Use of multilevel frameworks and area-based socioeconomic measures (ABSMs) for public health monitoring can potentially overcome the absence of socioeconomic data in most US public health surveillance systems.

    To assess whether ABSMs can meaningfully be used for diverse race/ethnicity–gender groups, we geocoded and linked public health surveillance data from Massachusetts and Rhode Island to 1990 block group, tract, and zip code ABSMs. Outcomes comprised death, birth, cancer incidence, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections, childhood lead poisoning, and nonfatal weapons-related injuries.

    Among White, Black, and Hispanic women and men, measures of economic deprivation (e.g., percentage below poverty) were most sensitive to expected socioeconomic gradients in health, with the most consistent results and maximal geocoding linkage evident for tract-level analyses. (author abstract)

    Use of multilevel frameworks and area-based socioeconomic measures (ABSMs) for public health monitoring can potentially overcome the absence of socioeconomic data in most US public health surveillance systems.

    To assess whether ABSMs can meaningfully be used for diverse race/ethnicity–gender groups, we geocoded and linked public health surveillance data from Massachusetts and Rhode Island to 1990 block group, tract, and zip code ABSMs. Outcomes comprised death, birth, cancer incidence, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections, childhood lead poisoning, and nonfatal weapons-related injuries.

    Among White, Black, and Hispanic women and men, measures of economic deprivation (e.g., percentage below poverty) were most sensitive to expected socioeconomic gradients in health, with the most consistent results and maximal geocoding linkage evident for tract-level analyses. (author abstract)

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