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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Srivastava, Shafali; Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This exploratory study looks at the role of child support in welfare reform. Specifically, it focuses on the child support case status and child support receipt of children whose families have left Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA; Maryland s TANF program). Subsequent analyses will examine the characteristics and employment situations of the non-custodial parents of children whose families formerly received welfare as well as further address the relationship between child support receipt and welfare recidivism.

    This project came about partially as a result of policy makers emphasizing that financial self-sufficiency for single parent families can be achieved through a combination of employment, support services, and child support from the non-custodial parent. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 acknowledged the importance of child support in the welfare-to-work equation by including provisions such as new enforcement tools and programs for non-custodial parents.

    This report examines the following research questions:

    1)...

    This exploratory study looks at the role of child support in welfare reform. Specifically, it focuses on the child support case status and child support receipt of children whose families have left Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA; Maryland s TANF program). Subsequent analyses will examine the characteristics and employment situations of the non-custodial parents of children whose families formerly received welfare as well as further address the relationship between child support receipt and welfare recidivism.

    This project came about partially as a result of policy makers emphasizing that financial self-sufficiency for single parent families can be achieved through a combination of employment, support services, and child support from the non-custodial parent. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 acknowledged the importance of child support in the welfare-to-work equation by including provisions such as new enforcement tools and programs for non-custodial parents.

    This report examines the following research questions:

    1) How many former welfare recipient children are known to the Maryland child support system?
    2) How many of these children have paternity established?
    3) How many of these children have a court order for current support? What are the amounts of these orders?
    4) What proportion of former welfare caseheads receive child support in the year after exiting the welfare rolls?
    5) Is child support related to a lower probability of returning to welfare? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Datta, Saugato; Fiorillo, Alexandra; Potok, Louis; Darling, Matthew; Balz, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author...

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Logan, Letitia; Saunders, Correne; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    In Maryland, five counties – Baltimore, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, and Prince George’s – piloted case stratification for six months between November 2010 to April 2011. The goal of the pilot was to determine whether varying the enforcement strategies based on payment history is effective in getting delinquent cases to start paying and for cases in good standing to continue payments. This report will provide information about payments among cases included in the pilot. The following questions will be answered:

    1) What percent of sample cases made payments compared to comparison group?
    2) What percent of recent non-paying sample cases made a payment during the pilot?
    3) What percent of severely delinquent sample cases made a payment during the pilot?

    Case stratification, as a means to improve payment compliance, could be a successful endeavor for agencies as it involves assessment of a case and the obligor in order to determine the best case management strategy for that case. To address the effectiveness of the Maryland case stratification pilot, we will...

    In Maryland, five counties – Baltimore, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, and Prince George’s – piloted case stratification for six months between November 2010 to April 2011. The goal of the pilot was to determine whether varying the enforcement strategies based on payment history is effective in getting delinquent cases to start paying and for cases in good standing to continue payments. This report will provide information about payments among cases included in the pilot. The following questions will be answered:

    1) What percent of sample cases made payments compared to comparison group?
    2) What percent of recent non-paying sample cases made a payment during the pilot?
    3) What percent of severely delinquent sample cases made a payment during the pilot?

    Case stratification, as a means to improve payment compliance, could be a successful endeavor for agencies as it involves assessment of a case and the obligor in order to determine the best case management strategy for that case. To address the effectiveness of the Maryland case stratification pilot, we will determine the frequency of payments made by pilot cases. Initially, we will provide some background on case stratification in general and in Maryland. Each findings chapter, separated by the three strata of cases created by the Maryland stratification criteria, will discuss the characteristics of the cases within that stratum and the payment frequencies of those cases compared to a comparison group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Landers, Patrick
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Key, Alicia G.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    The Texas Title IV-D child support agency has, on a universal basis, included parenting plans in its child support orders for the last thirty years. While most state child support agencies are just beginning to consider the idea of parenting time orders, Texas has successfully navigated federal regulations and federal funding limitations to ensure that parenting time is made available, as fairly and safely as possible. This article explains how this achievement has been possible, with the existence in Texas law of a standard possession order and a set of simple child support guidelines. It also discusses a variety of innovative and collaborative activities to inform and educate the public about the availability of these services. (Author abstract)

    The Texas Title IV-D child support agency has, on a universal basis, included parenting plans in its child support orders for the last thirty years. While most state child support agencies are just beginning to consider the idea of parenting time orders, Texas has successfully navigated federal regulations and federal funding limitations to ensure that parenting time is made available, as fairly and safely as possible. This article explains how this achievement has been possible, with the existence in Texas law of a standard possession order and a set of simple child support guidelines. It also discusses a variety of innovative and collaborative activities to inform and educate the public about the availability of these services. (Author abstract)

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