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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Brown, Elizabeth; Conroy, Kara; Kirby, Gretchen G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Individuals and families frequently qualify for multiple human services and employment programs that are funded, regulated, and administered by different federal agencies—each with their own eligibility criteria, program requirements, and performance indicators. Although these programs often share similar goals, they differ in the populations served, the services provided, and the implementation of performance measures. The performance measures component of the EMPOWERED study explores how aligned performance measurement might achieve accountability across programs that share similar goals and maximize efficiencies in program management and service coordination.

    This issue brief provides local perspec­tives on challenges and opportunities for aligning performance indicators across a variety of federal programs promoting self-sufficiency. The brief is informed by three in-depth case studies that included discussions with a range of administrators, supervisors, and frontline staff across select programs in the three localities. (Author abstract)

    Individuals and families frequently qualify for multiple human services and employment programs that are funded, regulated, and administered by different federal agencies—each with their own eligibility criteria, program requirements, and performance indicators. Although these programs often share similar goals, they differ in the populations served, the services provided, and the implementation of performance measures. The performance measures component of the EMPOWERED study explores how aligned performance measurement might achieve accountability across programs that share similar goals and maximize efficiencies in program management and service coordination.

    This issue brief provides local perspec­tives on challenges and opportunities for aligning performance indicators across a variety of federal programs promoting self-sufficiency. The brief is informed by three in-depth case studies that included discussions with a range of administrators, supervisors, and frontline staff across select programs in the three localities. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chinavare, Nehemiah; Dospoy, Kevin; Laurie, Chad
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    As Wisconsin implements changes to safety net programs for low-income people, the Department of Health Services (DHS) Division of Medicaid Services is evaluating the FoodShare Employment and Training (FSET) program, including whether it improves employment and earnings outcomes and increases self-sufficiency. This report provides an assessment of the services offered in Wisconsin through FSET. It provides DHS with a review of the efficacy of FSET training activities, and an explanation of data sources, outcomes, and measures. The report concludes with short-, medium-, and long-term recommendations to conduct a quality evaluation of FSET – separate monitoring and evaluation data, implement uniform data entry processes, and redesign the database. (Author abstract)

    As Wisconsin implements changes to safety net programs for low-income people, the Department of Health Services (DHS) Division of Medicaid Services is evaluating the FoodShare Employment and Training (FSET) program, including whether it improves employment and earnings outcomes and increases self-sufficiency. This report provides an assessment of the services offered in Wisconsin through FSET. It provides DHS with a review of the efficacy of FSET training activities, and an explanation of data sources, outcomes, and measures. The report concludes with short-, medium-, and long-term recommendations to conduct a quality evaluation of FSET – separate monitoring and evaluation data, implement uniform data entry processes, and redesign the database. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Codd, Nick
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T) can be a critical part of States’ efforts to help SNAP participants secure the training and employment opportunities they need to reach economic self-sufficiency. The program’s flexibility to provide targeted employment and training services as well as robust supports can make it an effective tool for responding to the needs of SNAP participants that face high barriers to employment, including individuals experiencing homelessness or housing instability. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kaz, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Melissa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Georgia is missing out on key opportunities to strengthen its workforce because it does not fully leverage the potential of safety net programs Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T).

    Georgia policymakers can better optimize federal funding to educate and train more residents earning low incomes, which will help meet the state’s need for a skilled and educated workforce. Georgia needs to produce an estimated 250,000 additional graduates with a certificate, associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree to meet its workforce needs by 2025. Focusing on Georgians with low incomes will have long-term benefits for the state. As these Georgians secure in-demand skills they are less likely to need to rely on public benefits. (Author abstract)

    Georgia is missing out on key opportunities to strengthen its workforce because it does not fully leverage the potential of safety net programs Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T).

    Georgia policymakers can better optimize federal funding to educate and train more residents earning low incomes, which will help meet the state’s need for a skilled and educated workforce. Georgia needs to produce an estimated 250,000 additional graduates with a certificate, associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree to meet its workforce needs by 2025. Focusing on Georgians with low incomes will have long-term benefits for the state. As these Georgians secure in-demand skills they are less likely to need to rely on public benefits. (Author abstract)

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