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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Fink, Barbara; Widom, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

    In order to fully understand how welfare reform influences the well-being of low-income families and communities, we must learn how human service organizations are affected by new welfare policies. This report examines agency staff members’ knowledge about welfare reform, their overall views of welfare reform, their experience of its impact on their agencies, and their expectations of how it will affect them. The findings offer preliminary insights into how new government policies shape other components of the network of service provision that is essential to the well-being of low-income families. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Gooden, Susan; Doolittle, Fred
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    One of a series of MDRC studies to examine the groundbreaking Wisconsin Works (W-2) welfare-to-work program, this paper focuses on one of the most intriguing - and controversial - features of the post-1996 welfare reform environment: What happens when welfare clients reach statutory time limits on program eligibility? Concentrating on welfare caseloads administered in Milwaukee County, the report found that only a small minority of program participants reached the 24-month limit set by law for aspects of W-2, and that for those who do file extension requests most are approved. But behind this finding are others: Agencies must routinely review the handling of cases well before the 24-month limit and procedures for resolving time-limit extension filings are time-consuming because they require intensive assessment of client participation in program activities and extensive documentation of medical conditions on which most time-limit extensions are requested. (author abstract)

    One of a series of MDRC studies to examine the groundbreaking Wisconsin Works (W-2) welfare-to-work program, this paper focuses on one of the most intriguing - and controversial - features of the post-1996 welfare reform environment: What happens when welfare clients reach statutory time limits on program eligibility? Concentrating on welfare caseloads administered in Milwaukee County, the report found that only a small minority of program participants reached the 24-month limit set by law for aspects of W-2, and that for those who do file extension requests most are approved. But behind this finding are others: Agencies must routinely review the handling of cases well before the 24-month limit and procedures for resolving time-limit extension filings are time-consuming because they require intensive assessment of client participation in program activities and extensive documentation of medical conditions on which most time-limit extensions are requested. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zedlewski, Sheila R.; Alderson, Donald W.
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2001

    The recent, rapid decline in the welfare rolls has led many to question whether families on welfare today differ significantly from those on before the new policies were implemented. In this paper we use two rounds of the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) to examine how families on welfare in 1999 differ from those receiving benefits in 1997 (a point just prior to when most states implemented their new Temporary Assistance for Needy Families [TANF] policies). We find some significant changes in the welfare population between 1997 and 1999, including an increase in single mothers living with partners, an increase in the share of welfare recipients that are African American, and an increase in paid work among adults on welfare. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we did not find that adults on TANF in 1999 were significantly more disadvantaged than those on welfare in 1997. We did find significantly more hardship among those who have been on TANF continuously for more than two years relative to those who recently entered TANF for the first time. However,...

    The recent, rapid decline in the welfare rolls has led many to question whether families on welfare today differ significantly from those on before the new policies were implemented. In this paper we use two rounds of the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) to examine how families on welfare in 1999 differ from those receiving benefits in 1997 (a point just prior to when most states implemented their new Temporary Assistance for Needy Families [TANF] policies). We find some significant changes in the welfare population between 1997 and 1999, including an increase in single mothers living with partners, an increase in the share of welfare recipients that are African American, and an increase in paid work among adults on welfare. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we did not find that adults on TANF in 1999 were significantly more disadvantaged than those on welfare in 1997. We did find significantly more hardship among those who have been on TANF continuously for more than two years relative to those who recently entered TANF for the first time. However, welfare cyclers looked more similar to continuous recipients than new entrants. Surprisingly, patterns of welfare entry and reentry were the same in 1999 as in 1997.
    
    Our results suggest that states still have considerable work ahead to ensure the success of TANF. While "work first" policies and financial incentives to move recipients into jobs have increased paid work significantly, there remains a significant group with multiple barriers to employment who are not engaged in any work activity. These recipients potentially face the risk of losing benefits through time limits. Many of those with serious barriers to employment will need intensive services to address these barriers. However, we do not yet have exemplary models of programs that address the needs of the hard-to-serve implemented on a broad scale in the states. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Patton, Deleena; Shah, Melissa; Felver, Barbara; Beall, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report describes key outcomes for parents and children who left TANF before and after recent program changes, including changes to the criteria for time limit extensions. WorkFirst cases make up a decreasing share of the TANF caseload relative to child-only cases, as a greater proportion of WorkFirst families leave and do not return. Relative to other groups of WorkFirst leavers, those who left due to time limits had high rates of baseline health risk but were less likely to transition to disability-related medical coverage. Time limited leavers and those who took longer to leave the caseload also faced greater barriers to work but remained connected to supports and services. (author abstract)

    This report describes key outcomes for parents and children who left TANF before and after recent program changes, including changes to the criteria for time limit extensions. WorkFirst cases make up a decreasing share of the TANF caseload relative to child-only cases, as a greater proportion of WorkFirst families leave and do not return. Relative to other groups of WorkFirst leavers, those who left due to time limits had high rates of baseline health risk but were less likely to transition to disability-related medical coverage. Time limited leavers and those who took longer to leave the caseload also faced greater barriers to work but remained connected to supports and services. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minkler, Meredith; Duerr Berrick, Jill; Needell, Barbara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1999

    Debate over the potential impacts of welfare reform largely has ignored the implications of these changes for the growing number of grandparents who are raising their grandchildren. Results of a qualitative study involving 36 key informants who were intimately involved in the crafting and/or implementation of California's welfare reform plan are presented. Particular attention is focused on time limits on aid, work requirements, and sanctions regarding teenage parenthood as these may impact on grandparent caregivers and their families. Cross-cutting themes also are presented. A case is made for greatly stepping up data collection and evaluative research that may help in determining the actual impacts of the legislation on intergenerational households headed by grandparents.(author abstract)

    This resource was previously published as a working paper by the Public Policy Institute of California.

    Debate over the potential impacts of welfare reform largely has ignored the implications of these changes for the growing number of grandparents who are raising their grandchildren. Results of a qualitative study involving 36 key informants who were intimately involved in the crafting and/or implementation of California's welfare reform plan are presented. Particular attention is focused on time limits on aid, work requirements, and sanctions regarding teenage parenthood as these may impact on grandparent caregivers and their families. Cross-cutting themes also are presented. A case is made for greatly stepping up data collection and evaluative research that may help in determining the actual impacts of the legislation on intergenerational households headed by grandparents.(author abstract)

    This resource was previously published as a working paper by the Public Policy Institute of California.

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