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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Logan, Letitia; Saunders, Correne; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    In Maryland, five counties – Baltimore, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, and Prince George’s – piloted case stratification for six months between November 2010 to April 2011. The goal of the pilot was to determine whether varying the enforcement strategies based on payment history is effective in getting delinquent cases to start paying and for cases in good standing to continue payments. This report will provide information about payments among cases included in the pilot. The following questions will be answered:

    1) What percent of sample cases made payments compared to comparison group?
    2) What percent of recent non-paying sample cases made a payment during the pilot?
    3) What percent of severely delinquent sample cases made a payment during the pilot?

    Case stratification, as a means to improve payment compliance, could be a successful endeavor for agencies as it involves assessment of a case and the obligor in order to determine the best case management strategy for that case. To address the effectiveness of the Maryland case stratification pilot, we will...

    In Maryland, five counties – Baltimore, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, and Prince George’s – piloted case stratification for six months between November 2010 to April 2011. The goal of the pilot was to determine whether varying the enforcement strategies based on payment history is effective in getting delinquent cases to start paying and for cases in good standing to continue payments. This report will provide information about payments among cases included in the pilot. The following questions will be answered:

    1) What percent of sample cases made payments compared to comparison group?
    2) What percent of recent non-paying sample cases made a payment during the pilot?
    3) What percent of severely delinquent sample cases made a payment during the pilot?

    Case stratification, as a means to improve payment compliance, could be a successful endeavor for agencies as it involves assessment of a case and the obligor in order to determine the best case management strategy for that case. To address the effectiveness of the Maryland case stratification pilot, we will determine the frequency of payments made by pilot cases. Initially, we will provide some background on case stratification in general and in Maryland. Each findings chapter, separated by the three strata of cases created by the Maryland stratification criteria, will discuss the characteristics of the cases within that stratum and the payment frequencies of those cases compared to a comparison group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dechausay, Nadine; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Farrell, Mary; Hall, Crystal; Schmitt, Emily
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

  • Individual Author: Gleason, Elizabeth; Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hall, Lauren A.; Demyan, Natalie; Logan Passarella, Letitia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report examines a random sample of IV-D child support orders established or modified between 2011 and 2014. Consistent with previous reviews, most (70.7%) order amounts were based on Maryland’s child support guidelines. However, many of the orders that deviated from the guidelines-recommended amount did not list a reason for the deviation. (Author abstract)

    This report examines a random sample of IV-D child support orders established or modified between 2011 and 2014. Consistent with previous reviews, most (70.7%) order amounts were based on Maryland’s child support guidelines. However, many of the orders that deviated from the guidelines-recommended amount did not list a reason for the deviation. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turetsky, Vicki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The mission of the child support program is undergoing a basic shift from welfare cost recovery to helping parents support their children. However, the child support program's reimbursement policies have interfered with states' ability to implement policies to bolster family support. As states assess their capacity to improve their services to low-income parents, there are a number of policies they can consider. These policies include: (1) paying all child support to families on welfare; (2) setting realistic orders for poor fathers; (3) developing arrearage management policies; and (4) implementing case management strategies. By implementing realistic and flexible practices that encourage, rather than inhibit, the payment of regular child support by low-income fathers, child support programs can help low-income families more effectively in sustaining employment, improving family relationships, and supporting the involvement of both parents in their children's lives. (author abstract)

    The mission of the child support program is undergoing a basic shift from welfare cost recovery to helping parents support their children. However, the child support program's reimbursement policies have interfered with states' ability to implement policies to bolster family support. As states assess their capacity to improve their services to low-income parents, there are a number of policies they can consider. These policies include: (1) paying all child support to families on welfare; (2) setting realistic orders for poor fathers; (3) developing arrearage management policies; and (4) implementing case management strategies. By implementing realistic and flexible practices that encourage, rather than inhibit, the payment of regular child support by low-income fathers, child support programs can help low-income families more effectively in sustaining employment, improving family relationships, and supporting the involvement of both parents in their children's lives. (author abstract)

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