Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Chaudry, Ajay
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2006

    In the five years following the passage of federal welfare reform law, the labor force participation of low-income, single mothers with young children climbed by more than 25 percent. With significantly more hours spent outside the home, single working mothers face a serious childcare crunch—how can they provide quality care for their children? In Putting Children First, Ajay Chaudry follows 42 low-income families in New York City over three years to illuminate the plight of these mothers and the ways in which they respond to the difficult challenge of providing for their children’s material and developmental needs with limited resources.
     
    Using the words of the women themselves, Chaudry tells a startling story. Scarce subsidies, complicated bureaucracies, inflexible work schedules, and limited choices force families to piece together care arrangements that are often unstable, unreliable, inconvenient, and of limited quality. Because their wages are so low, these women are forced to rely on inexpensive caregivers who are often under-qualified to serve the developmental...

    In the five years following the passage of federal welfare reform law, the labor force participation of low-income, single mothers with young children climbed by more than 25 percent. With significantly more hours spent outside the home, single working mothers face a serious childcare crunch—how can they provide quality care for their children? In Putting Children First, Ajay Chaudry follows 42 low-income families in New York City over three years to illuminate the plight of these mothers and the ways in which they respond to the difficult challenge of providing for their children’s material and developmental needs with limited resources.
     
    Using the words of the women themselves, Chaudry tells a startling story. Scarce subsidies, complicated bureaucracies, inflexible work schedules, and limited choices force families to piece together care arrangements that are often unstable, unreliable, inconvenient, and of limited quality. Because their wages are so low, these women are forced to rely on inexpensive caregivers who are often under-qualified to serve the developmental needs of their children. Even when these mothers find good, affordable care, it rarely lasts long because their volatile employment situations throw their needs into constant flux. The average woman in Chaudry’s sample had to find five different primary caregivers in her child’s first four years, while over a quarter of them needed seven or more in that time.
     
    This book lets single, low-income mothers describe the childcare arrangements they desire and the ways that options available to them fail to meet even their most basic needs. As Chaudry tracks these women through erratic childcare spells, he reveals the strategies they employ, the tremendous costs they incur and the anxiety they face when trying to ensure that their children are given proper care.
     
    Honest, powerful, and alarming, Putting Children First gives a fresh perspective on work and family for the disadvantaged. It infuses a human voice into the ongoing debate about the effectiveness of welfare reform, showing the flaws of a social policy based solely on personal responsibility without concurrent societal responsibility, and suggesting a better path for the future. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2016

    This set of selections focuses on two-generation strategies. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of selections focuses on two-generation strategies. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Dechausay, Nadine; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Farrell, Mary; Hall, Crystal; Schmitt, Emily
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Nogales, Renée; Cohen, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Highlights findings from an in-depth study of collaborative community initiatives to improve low-income families' access to good-quality care for infants and toddlers. Focuses on three types of initiatives launched in diverse communities. Notes that paying for care and ensuring good-quality care are cross-cutting concerns. (Author summary)

    Highlights findings from an in-depth study of collaborative community initiatives to improve low-income families' access to good-quality care for infants and toddlers. Focuses on three types of initiatives launched in diverse communities. Notes that paying for care and ensuring good-quality care are cross-cutting concerns. (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Schumacher, Rachel; Greenberg, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    In light of significant welfare caseload declines since the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, many questions have been raised about the circumstances of families and children no longer receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance. In response to these questions, a number of states have initiated what have come to be known as "leaver" studies, examining the situations of families whose welfare cases have been closed. Initial study results found that a majority of survey respondents who had left welfare were now working, typically for more than thirty hours a week, and typically in jobs with wages below the poverty line. A number of the leaver studies also seek information concerning the child care arrangements or use of child care subsidies by families leaving welfare. This paper describes key findings from a review of data relevant to child care gathered through surveys of families who have left welfare. (author abstract)

    In light of significant welfare caseload declines since the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, many questions have been raised about the circumstances of families and children no longer receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance. In response to these questions, a number of states have initiated what have come to be known as "leaver" studies, examining the situations of families whose welfare cases have been closed. Initial study results found that a majority of survey respondents who had left welfare were now working, typically for more than thirty hours a week, and typically in jobs with wages below the poverty line. A number of the leaver studies also seek information concerning the child care arrangements or use of child care subsidies by families leaving welfare. This paper describes key findings from a review of data relevant to child care gathered through surveys of families who have left welfare. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1991 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations