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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Eberts, Randall W.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    The purpose of this paper is to provide preliminary information about the design of a pilot project to test the efficacy of profiling and referring welfare-to-work participants. Welfare reform requires welfare recipients, with few exceptions, to participate in work activities and ultimately become economically self-sufficient. Welfare recipients possess a wide variation in job readiness skills, ranging from those who are ready and able to work to those who face significant barriers to employment. The challenge of the local administrator of welfare-to-work programs is to target services to those who need them the most. Yet, most programs provide the same services to all participants, regardless of their past work history or skills. Profiling is a management tool that statistically identifies individuals as to the probability that they will obtain employment. The probability is derived from a statistical model using information commonly collected at enrollment interviews. The model estimates the relationship between an individual's propensity to find and hold a job and that person'...

    The purpose of this paper is to provide preliminary information about the design of a pilot project to test the efficacy of profiling and referring welfare-to-work participants. Welfare reform requires welfare recipients, with few exceptions, to participate in work activities and ultimately become economically self-sufficient. Welfare recipients possess a wide variation in job readiness skills, ranging from those who are ready and able to work to those who face significant barriers to employment. The challenge of the local administrator of welfare-to-work programs is to target services to those who need them the most. Yet, most programs provide the same services to all participants, regardless of their past work history or skills. Profiling is a management tool that statistically identifies individuals as to the probability that they will obtain employment. The probability is derived from a statistical model using information commonly collected at enrollment interviews. The model estimates the relationship between an individual's propensity to find and hold a job and that person's attributes, work and welfare histories, and local labor market conditions. The paper describes the model and shows how it can be incorporated into existing welfare-to-work programs that emphasize work-related activities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Liberman, Ruth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Massachusetts lags behind other states in preparing unemployed and underemployed adults who participate in the state’s welfare program (TAFDC) to compete in the 21st century labor market. The state needs to deploy new economic mobility strategies that coordinate existing public and private resources to provide more comprehensive and integrated education, training, and support services to low-income parents. Massachusetts should also improve traditional service delivery approaches by applying learning from new brain research to building the personal life skills competencies needed to optimize economic stability for low-income families. This new paper, authored by CWU Vice President of Public Policy Ruth Liberman, offers Massachusetts legislators and policy leaders a set of recommendations on how to redesign the TAFDC program to effectively promote economic mobility. (author abstract)

    Massachusetts lags behind other states in preparing unemployed and underemployed adults who participate in the state’s welfare program (TAFDC) to compete in the 21st century labor market. The state needs to deploy new economic mobility strategies that coordinate existing public and private resources to provide more comprehensive and integrated education, training, and support services to low-income parents. Massachusetts should also improve traditional service delivery approaches by applying learning from new brain research to building the personal life skills competencies needed to optimize economic stability for low-income families. This new paper, authored by CWU Vice President of Public Policy Ruth Liberman, offers Massachusetts legislators and policy leaders a set of recommendations on how to redesign the TAFDC program to effectively promote economic mobility. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brown, Kay E.
    Year: 2012

    The federal-state TANF partnership makes significant resources available to address poverty in the lives of families with children. With these resources, TANF has provided a basic safety net to many families and helped many parents step into jobs. At the same time, there are questions about the strength and breadth of the TANF safety net. Many eligible families—some of whom have very low incomes—are not receiving TANF cash assistance. Regarding TANF as a welfare-to-work program, the emphasis on work participation rates as a measure of state program performance has helped change the culture of state welfare programs to focus on moving families into employment. However, features of the work participation rates as currently implemented undercut their effectiveness as a way to encourage states to engage parents, including those difficult to serve, and help them achieve self-sufficiency. Finally, states have used TANF funds to support a variety of programs other than cash assistance as allowed by law. Yet, we do not know enough about this spending or whether this flexibility is...

    The federal-state TANF partnership makes significant resources available to address poverty in the lives of families with children. With these resources, TANF has provided a basic safety net to many families and helped many parents step into jobs. At the same time, there are questions about the strength and breadth of the TANF safety net. Many eligible families—some of whom have very low incomes—are not receiving TANF cash assistance. Regarding TANF as a welfare-to-work program, the emphasis on work participation rates as a measure of state program performance has helped change the culture of state welfare programs to focus on moving families into employment. However, features of the work participation rates as currently implemented undercut their effectiveness as a way to encourage states to engage parents, including those difficult to serve, and help them achieve self-sufficiency. Finally, states have used TANF funds to support a variety of programs other than cash assistance as allowed by law. Yet, we do not know enough about this spending or whether this flexibility is resulting in the most efficient and effective use of funds at this time. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Hedderson, John; Lichter, Michael; González, Elizabeth; Henderson, Jeff
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    In this report, we present a preliminary analysis of the performance of CalWORKs in Los Angeles County. We are especially interested in how well the GAIN program moves families from welfare to employment and economic self-sufficiency. Although our work at this time is based on administrative records, we are beginning surveys and focus groups that will enable us to report on barriers to employment, support services and job satisfaction. In the first quarter of 1999, we will report on the best practices and obstacles to the success of CalWORKs. In the second quarter of 1999, we will address the broader impacts of CalWORKs on participants, their families and their communities. Although this first report is based on limited data, it provides important initial findings to be used as baseline statistics in later evaluations. (author abstract)

    In this report, we present a preliminary analysis of the performance of CalWORKs in Los Angeles County. We are especially interested in how well the GAIN program moves families from welfare to employment and economic self-sufficiency. Although our work at this time is based on administrative records, we are beginning surveys and focus groups that will enable us to report on barriers to employment, support services and job satisfaction. In the first quarter of 1999, we will report on the best practices and obstacles to the success of CalWORKs. In the second quarter of 1999, we will address the broader impacts of CalWORKs on participants, their families and their communities. Although this first report is based on limited data, it provides important initial findings to be used as baseline statistics in later evaluations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Azurdia, Gilda; Barnes, Zakia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    This paper and accompanying tables present the implementation results and two-year impacts on employment, earnings, and public assistance receipt for the Career Builders program in Portland, Oregon. Using a team-based case management approach, Career Builders intended to remove employment barriers and assist with job placement and employment retention and advancement for a particular group: applicants and recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who had a break in employment or received TANF in the two years prior to study entry. The program was run from two district offices of the Oregon Department of Human Services (“North” and “East” offices) in collaboration with two community colleges (Mount Hood Community College [MHCC] and Portland Community College [PCC]). (author abstract)

    This paper and accompanying tables present the implementation results and two-year impacts on employment, earnings, and public assistance receipt for the Career Builders program in Portland, Oregon. Using a team-based case management approach, Career Builders intended to remove employment barriers and assist with job placement and employment retention and advancement for a particular group: applicants and recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who had a break in employment or received TANF in the two years prior to study entry. The program was run from two district offices of the Oregon Department of Human Services (“North” and “East” offices) in collaboration with two community colleges (Mount Hood Community College [MHCC] and Portland Community College [PCC]). (author abstract)

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