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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Blanchard, Kimberly A.; Sexton, Chris C.; Morgenstern, Jon; McVeigh, Katharine H.; McCrady, Barbara S.; Morgan, Thomas J.; Irwin, Thomas W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The present study sought to characterize well-being indicators for a sample of children of substance dependent TANF women. Participants were 372 mothers meeting DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence and 156 non-substance abusing women from two urban counties in New Jersey. Children of substance dependent TANF mothers experienced significant vulnerabilities, as demonstrated by higher levels of contextual risk factors and negative behavioral and emotional and school outcomes. Overall, these rates were about double those found in children of non-substance abusing mothers. Results highlight the need for multi-systemic services to address the problems experienced by substance abusing TANF women and their children.(author abstract)

    The present study sought to characterize well-being indicators for a sample of children of substance dependent TANF women. Participants were 372 mothers meeting DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence and 156 non-substance abusing women from two urban counties in New Jersey. Children of substance dependent TANF mothers experienced significant vulnerabilities, as demonstrated by higher levels of contextual risk factors and negative behavioral and emotional and school outcomes. Overall, these rates were about double those found in children of non-substance abusing mothers. Results highlight the need for multi-systemic services to address the problems experienced by substance abusing TANF women and their children.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Miller, Cynthia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) system in three key ways: (1) Financial incentives to work. In MFIP, more earnings were disregarded when calculating grant levels, and child care payments were paid directly to providers; (2) Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term welfare recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce., and; (3) Simplification of rules and procedures. MFIP combined AFDC, Food Stamps, and the state-run Family General Assistance (FGA) program into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.

    A central concern surrounding the recent wave of welfare reforms is how children will fare if their parents are subject to such policies as work mandates, time limits, and enhanced earnings disregards....

    In 1994, the state of Minnesota began a major welfare reform initiative aimed at encouraging work, reducing dependence on public assistance, and reducing poverty. The Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) differed from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) system in three key ways: (1) Financial incentives to work. In MFIP, more earnings were disregarded when calculating grant levels, and child care payments were paid directly to providers; (2) Participation requirements for long-term recipients. If not working full time, long-term welfare recipients had to participate in services designed to move them quickly into the workforce., and; (3) Simplification of rules and procedures. MFIP combined AFDC, Food Stamps, and the state-run Family General Assistance (FGA) program into a single program with one set of rules and procedures and one monthly payment.

    A central concern surrounding the recent wave of welfare reforms is how children will fare if their parents are subject to such policies as work mandates, time limits, and enhanced earnings disregards. Although research in child development suggests that children are affected by changes in their parents’ employment, income, and other aspects of the family environment, the net effects of these types of programs are not well understood. The findings in this report present one of the first looks at the effects of an innovative welfare reform policy on children. It also provides an unusual opportunity to more broadly assess how changes in income and employment can affect children’s outcomes. MFIP began operating in April 1994 in three urban and four rural Minnesota counties, and the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), under contract with the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), has been tracking its implementation and effects. Between April 1994 and March 1996, over 14,000 families were assigned at random, using a lottery-type process, to either the MFIP or the AFDC system. This study, which focuses on family and child well-being, follows a sample of families in the urban counties of the MFIP evaluation who had a child age 2 to 9 at the time of random assignment. MFIP’s effects on families and children are assessed by comparing the outcomes for the experimental group (MFIP) and the control group (AFDC) three years after they entered the evaluation. Reforming Welfare and Rewarding Work: Final Report on the Minnesota Family Investment Program, Effects on Adults, Volume 1 of the final report on MFIP, discusses adults in the study and focuses on MFIP’s effects on such economic outcomes as employment, earnings, welfare receipt, and income for the full evaluation sample. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Elliott, William; Lewis, Melinda; Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Nam, IlSung
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Postsecondary education costs in the United States today are rising with an increasing shift from societal responsibility to individual burden, thereby driving greater student borrowing. Evidence suggests that (i) such student debt may have undesirable educational effects and potentially jeopardize household balance sheets and (ii) student loans may better support educational attainment and economic mobility if accompanied by other, non-repayable financial awards. However, given declines in need-based aid and falling state support for postsecondary costs, policymakers and parents alike have failed to produce a compelling complement to debt-dependent financial aid that is capable of improving outcomes and forestalling assumption of ever-increasing student debt for a majority of U.S. households. This article, which relies on longitudinal data from the Educational Longitudinal Study, finds parental college savings may be an important protective factor in reducing debt assumption. However, several other factors increase the likelihood students will borrow: perceiving financial aid as...

    Postsecondary education costs in the United States today are rising with an increasing shift from societal responsibility to individual burden, thereby driving greater student borrowing. Evidence suggests that (i) such student debt may have undesirable educational effects and potentially jeopardize household balance sheets and (ii) student loans may better support educational attainment and economic mobility if accompanied by other, non-repayable financial awards. However, given declines in need-based aid and falling state support for postsecondary costs, policymakers and parents alike have failed to produce a compelling complement to debt-dependent financial aid that is capable of improving outcomes and forestalling assumption of ever-increasing student debt for a majority of U.S. households. This article, which relies on longitudinal data from the Educational Longitudinal Study, finds parental college savings may be an important protective factor in reducing debt assumption. However, several other factors increase the likelihood students will borrow: perceiving financial aid as necessary for college attendance, expecting to borrow to finance higher education, having moderate income, and attending a for-profit college. After controlling for student and school variables, the authors find that parental college savings increase a student’s chance of accumulating lower debt (less than $2,000) compared with students lacking such savings. Policy innovations to increase parental college savings— such as children’s savings accounts—could be an important piece of the response to the student debt problem in the United States. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Theodos, Brett; Pergamit, Mike; Edelstein, Sara ; Derian, Alexandra; Stolte, Allison
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS Workshop describes an implementation evaluation for Promotor Pathway, a program which provides case management, mentoring, and support to at-risk youth in the DC Metropolitan area.

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS Workshop describes an implementation evaluation for Promotor Pathway, a program which provides case management, mentoring, and support to at-risk youth in the DC Metropolitan area.

  • Individual Author: Manno, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop describes data collection protocols, evaluation opportunities, and implementation fidelity of YouthBuild, a program providing wraparound educational, vocational, case management, transition, and leadership development services for disconnected, low income, at-risk youth.

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop describes data collection protocols, evaluation opportunities, and implementation fidelity of YouthBuild, a program providing wraparound educational, vocational, case management, transition, and leadership development services for disconnected, low income, at-risk youth.

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