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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Elkin, Sam
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    This report examines strategies Colorado counties were using to serve the hard-to-employ TANF population in 2005, highlighting promising approaches that counties might choose to adopt and providing  the state with useful information that can help guide future policy choices. While there are a wide range of issues that affect welfare recipients’ ability to succeed in the job market, this report focuses on seven barriers: 1) Physical disabilities; 2) Limited education and learning disabilities; 3) Mental health; 4) Substance abuse; 5) Domestic violence; 6) Limited English skills; and 7) Homelessness. (author abstract)

    This report examines strategies Colorado counties were using to serve the hard-to-employ TANF population in 2005, highlighting promising approaches that counties might choose to adopt and providing  the state with useful information that can help guide future policy choices. While there are a wide range of issues that affect welfare recipients’ ability to succeed in the job market, this report focuses on seven barriers: 1) Physical disabilities; 2) Limited education and learning disabilities; 3) Mental health; 4) Substance abuse; 5) Domestic violence; 6) Limited English skills; and 7) Homelessness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rehnquist, Janet
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA, P.L. 104-193) of 1996 replaced the Federal entitlement program Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program. The legislation imposes strict work requirements, limits Federal assistance to five years, and establishes minimum work participation rates. Within these limits, States have broad flexibility to design their own programs to promote work and self-sufficiency.

    Individuals on the welfare caseload may have significant barriers to employment and difficultly finding and sustaining work. These recipients are often referred to as hard-to-employ. Many of these individuals had been exempted from work participation under the former AFDC program but are now subject to work requirements under PRWORA. Further, they are the part of the caseload that may reach the five-year time limit and no longer qualify for Federal assistance.
    This inspection identifies State strategies for helping hard-to-employ recipients who have...

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA, P.L. 104-193) of 1996 replaced the Federal entitlement program Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program. The legislation imposes strict work requirements, limits Federal assistance to five years, and establishes minimum work participation rates. Within these limits, States have broad flexibility to design their own programs to promote work and self-sufficiency.

    Individuals on the welfare caseload may have significant barriers to employment and difficultly finding and sustaining work. These recipients are often referred to as hard-to-employ. Many of these individuals had been exempted from work participation under the former AFDC program but are now subject to work requirements under PRWORA. Further, they are the part of the caseload that may reach the five-year time limit and no longer qualify for Federal assistance.
    This inspection identifies State strategies for helping hard-to-employ recipients who have significant barriers to employment. Based on discussions with researchers and practitioners, we focused on the following eight barriers:

    • Substance abuse
    • Physical disabilities
    • Domestic violence
    • Learning disabilities
    • Mental health issues
    • Language barriers
    • Chronic health problems
    • Multiple barriers

    This inspection is based on a review of each State’s TANF plan and a telephone survey of TANF officials from each of the 50 States and the District of Columbia. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holcomb, Pamela A.; Tumlin, Karen; Koralek, Robin; Capps, Randy; Zuberi, Anita
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This report explores one key dimension of access to public benefits—the application and eligibility determination process. Of particular interest is how local-level administrative procedures and operations may generally affect eligible families' access to benefits. Special consideration is given to exploring these issues as they relate to immigrants and limited English speakers.

    The four major public benefits programs examined in this study are Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), food stamps, Medicaid, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The findings presented are primarily based on site visits conducted between June 2001 and December 2001 in six different localities: New York City (five counties/NY), Dallas (Dallas and Tarrant Counties/TX), Seattle (King County/WA), Raleigh (Wake County/NC), Arlington (Arlington County/VA), and Sedalia (Pettis County/MO). The sites vary in terms of the overall size of their client base and the diversity of the immigrant population, and the way in which application and eligibility determination processes...

    This report explores one key dimension of access to public benefits—the application and eligibility determination process. Of particular interest is how local-level administrative procedures and operations may generally affect eligible families' access to benefits. Special consideration is given to exploring these issues as they relate to immigrants and limited English speakers.

    The four major public benefits programs examined in this study are Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), food stamps, Medicaid, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The findings presented are primarily based on site visits conducted between June 2001 and December 2001 in six different localities: New York City (five counties/NY), Dallas (Dallas and Tarrant Counties/TX), Seattle (King County/WA), Raleigh (Wake County/NC), Arlington (Arlington County/VA), and Sedalia (Pettis County/MO). The sites vary in terms of the overall size of their client base and the diversity of the immigrant population, and the way in which application and eligibility determination processes are structured and implemented. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Copson, Elizabeth; Gardiner, Karen; Kitrosser, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). It is among nine career pathways programs being evaluated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Carreras en Salud program consists of five elements: (1) a structured healthcare training pathway, starting at low skill levels; (2) contextualized and accelerated basic skills and ESL instruction; (3) academic advising and non-academic supports; (4) financial assistance; and (5) employment services. Using a rigorous...

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). It is among nine career pathways programs being evaluated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Carreras en Salud program consists of five elements: (1) a structured healthcare training pathway, starting at low skill levels; (2) contextualized and accelerated basic skills and ESL instruction; (3) academic advising and non-academic supports; (4) financial assistance; and (5) employment services. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that the Carreras en Salud program increased hours of occupational training and basic skills instruction received and the attainment of education credentials within an 18-month follow-up period. The program also increased employment in the healthcare field and resulted in a reduction of participants reporting financial hardship. Future reports will examine whether these effects translate into gains in employment and earnings. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Proscio, Tony
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Despite its high employment rate, the Near Northside Neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas, has a median income more than 40% below the citywide level. In 1999, the Near Northside Partners' Council (NNPC) became one of five centers for the national Neighborhood Jobs Initiative Demonstration. After extensive planning, the Neighborhood Jobs Initiative started full operation in Fort Worth's Near Northside in 2000. The Initiative is using a place-based approach to addressing the intermingled issues of culture, work, and intergenerational poverty by relying heavily on a network of cooperating community organizations with different specialties, including the Tarrant County College. The Initiative's initial objective has been to bring the level of adult employment among the heavily Latino neighborhood's residents to the level of the surrounding region over a period of several years while simultaneously working to increase the wages and quality of neighborhood residents' employment. Other areas on which the Initiative is placing special emphasis include encouraging more women to enter...

    Despite its high employment rate, the Near Northside Neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas, has a median income more than 40% below the citywide level. In 1999, the Near Northside Partners' Council (NNPC) became one of five centers for the national Neighborhood Jobs Initiative Demonstration. After extensive planning, the Neighborhood Jobs Initiative started full operation in Fort Worth's Near Northside in 2000. The Initiative is using a place-based approach to addressing the intermingled issues of culture, work, and intergenerational poverty by relying heavily on a network of cooperating community organizations with different specialties, including the Tarrant County College. The Initiative's initial objective has been to bring the level of adult employment among the heavily Latino neighborhood's residents to the level of the surrounding region over a period of several years while simultaneously working to increase the wages and quality of neighborhood residents' employment. Other areas on which the Initiative is placing special emphasis include encouraging more women to enter training and employment, improving residents' English, meeting the need for workers with computer skills, and managing the evolving program in a manner permitting quick response to new opportunities. As of mid-2001, the Initiative's APEX (Achieving Program Excellence) program had served roughly 200 people (about 2% of the neighborhood's population). (MN) (ERIC abstract)

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