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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: van Olphen, Juliana ; Freudenberg, Nicholas
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Substance abuse is a significant health and social problem in many low income urban communities. Finding appropriate help for drug users has been identified as a significant barrier to reducing the harm from drug abuse. This report presents findings from a survey of service providers in the Central and East Harlem communities, New York City, conducted in 2000 to identify policy obstacles that impeded clients’ attempts to overcome substance use and related problems. Policies can affect substance users by making access to drug treatment more difficult or by imposing unrealistic expectations on substance users for eligibility for benefit programs. Respondents to the survey were asked to rate 30 specific policies as harmful or helpful to their clients and to assess how the policies acted as barriers or facilitators to getting services and reducing drug use. Eleven policies in the areas of drug treatment, corrections, and Medicaid were rated as harmful to their clients by more than 50% of the respondents. We discuss the implications of these and other findings for drug users’ ability...

    Substance abuse is a significant health and social problem in many low income urban communities. Finding appropriate help for drug users has been identified as a significant barrier to reducing the harm from drug abuse. This report presents findings from a survey of service providers in the Central and East Harlem communities, New York City, conducted in 2000 to identify policy obstacles that impeded clients’ attempts to overcome substance use and related problems. Policies can affect substance users by making access to drug treatment more difficult or by imposing unrealistic expectations on substance users for eligibility for benefit programs. Respondents to the survey were asked to rate 30 specific policies as harmful or helpful to their clients and to assess how the policies acted as barriers or facilitators to getting services and reducing drug use. Eleven policies in the areas of drug treatment, corrections, and Medicaid were rated as harmful to their clients by more than 50% of the respondents. We discuss the implications of these and other findings for drug users’ ability to seek and receive help for their problems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kramer, Fredrica D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) agency personnel, offers a baseline for understanding the challenge of serving persons who are being forced off welfare rolls but who are hard to place in employment. The following topics are covered: (1) policy issues (who should be considered hard to place?; interaction of work requirements and time limits for hard-to-place); (2) research findings (prevalence of potential employment barriers; relationship to work); (3) program options (assessment tools; staffing; service options; funding options); and (4) innovative practices (special needs; post-employment strategies; and comprehensive models). A list of 14 resources contacts and 18 publications is included. (author abstract)

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) agency personnel, offers a baseline for understanding the challenge of serving persons who are being forced off welfare rolls but who are hard to place in employment. The following topics are covered: (1) policy issues (who should be considered hard to place?; interaction of work requirements and time limits for hard-to-place); (2) research findings (prevalence of potential employment barriers; relationship to work); (3) program options (assessment tools; staffing; service options; funding options); and (4) innovative practices (special needs; post-employment strategies; and comprehensive models). A list of 14 resources contacts and 18 publications is included. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan; Redcross, Cindy; Hsueh, JoAnn; Rich, Sarah; Martin, Vanessa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    In the post-welfare reform world, an important policy question has taken new prominence: how to improve employment prospects for the millions of Americans who face serious obstacles to steady work. These individuals, including long-term welfare recipients, people with disabilities, those with health or behavioral health problems, and former prisoners, often become trapped in costly public assistance and enforcement systems and find themselves living in poverty, outside the mainstream in a society that prizes work and self-sufficiency. The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project, sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), with additional funding from the Department of Labor, is evaluating four diverse strategies designed to improve employment and other outcomes for low-income parents and others who face serious barriers to employment. (Author abstract)

    In the post-welfare reform world, an important policy question has taken new prominence: how to improve employment prospects for the millions of Americans who face serious obstacles to steady work. These individuals, including long-term welfare recipients, people with disabilities, those with health or behavioral health problems, and former prisoners, often become trapped in costly public assistance and enforcement systems and find themselves living in poverty, outside the mainstream in a society that prizes work and self-sufficiency. The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project, sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), with additional funding from the Department of Labor, is evaluating four diverse strategies designed to improve employment and other outcomes for low-income parents and others who face serious barriers to employment. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Skemer, Melanie
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference provides findings from an implementation evaluation of YVLifeSet, a program for young adults who were in foster care of juvenile justice custody This program provides case management, coaching, and life skills education.

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference provides findings from an implementation evaluation of YVLifeSet, a program for young adults who were in foster care of juvenile justice custody This program provides case management, coaching, and life skills education.

  • Individual Author: Glidden, Marc D.; Brown, Timothy C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    This study examines the level of financial literacy of inmates in Arkansas correctional institutions. Furthermore, it compares the financial knowledge, planning, and practices between not only white and non-white inmates but also between males within and outside of penal institutions. Specifically, this research combines primary data on the financial realities of those within correctional institutions and existing statistics on the public to examine the relationship between demographics, banking history, use of non-traditional lenders, and financial literacy. While prior literature on the public is extensive, research on the financial literacy of individuals currently incarcerated is sparse. Findings indicate vast differences between the public and those within penal institutions, particularly in financial knowledge and planning. For our incarcerated sample we find similar disparities between our white and non-white respondents. Last, we find that youth, minority status, and lowered education are predictors of lower financial knowledge, use of predatory lender use, and poor...

    This study examines the level of financial literacy of inmates in Arkansas correctional institutions. Furthermore, it compares the financial knowledge, planning, and practices between not only white and non-white inmates but also between males within and outside of penal institutions. Specifically, this research combines primary data on the financial realities of those within correctional institutions and existing statistics on the public to examine the relationship between demographics, banking history, use of non-traditional lenders, and financial literacy. While prior literature on the public is extensive, research on the financial literacy of individuals currently incarcerated is sparse. Findings indicate vast differences between the public and those within penal institutions, particularly in financial knowledge and planning. For our incarcerated sample we find similar disparities between our white and non-white respondents. Last, we find that youth, minority status, and lowered education are predictors of lower financial knowledge, use of predatory lender use, and poor financial planning among inmates. This is crucial because low levels of financial literacy, use of predatory lenders, and poor financial planning often provide barriers to asset accumulation, which increases the probability of incarceration and recidivism. (Author abstract)

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