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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sherman, Rachel
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2003

    Many recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) face significant barriers to employment, including severe mental or physical disabilities, that may prevent them from fulfilling the TANF work requirements. Without the appropriate intensive services and supports, these individuals may be sanctioned or may reach the time limit on federal assistance before they are able to achieve self-sufficiency. These individuals may be included in the 20% of the caseload that states may exempt from the federal time limits, but at least some of these individuals may be better served by securing cash benefits under the federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI provides need-based cash benefits to individuals 65 and older and individuals with disabilities, including disabled children The SSI program can provide these individuals with more appropriate services and long-term income support, without the work requirements and time limits associated with TANF. Recently, federal legislation has tightened eligibility criteria particularly as it relates to alcohol and...

    Many recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) face significant barriers to employment, including severe mental or physical disabilities, that may prevent them from fulfilling the TANF work requirements. Without the appropriate intensive services and supports, these individuals may be sanctioned or may reach the time limit on federal assistance before they are able to achieve self-sufficiency. These individuals may be included in the 20% of the caseload that states may exempt from the federal time limits, but at least some of these individuals may be better served by securing cash benefits under the federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI provides need-based cash benefits to individuals 65 and older and individuals with disabilities, including disabled children The SSI program can provide these individuals with more appropriate services and long-term income support, without the work requirements and time limits associated with TANF. Recently, federal legislation has tightened eligibility criteria particularly as it relates to alcohol and substance abuse and to the definition of children’s disabilities; however, SSI remains an option for a number of TANF recipients and applicants who may meet the federal disability criteria.

    This Resources for Welfare Decisions provides information and resources to help TANF agencies in their efforts to move eligible TANF recipients with disabilities to the SSI system. (author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Williamson, Sarah; Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud ; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Between October 2007 and October 2011, the long-term disabled caseload in Maryland grew by over 80%, compared to only 40% for the total Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) caseload in the state. In order to better understand this growing population, this report provides a snapshot of Maryland’s long-term disabled TCA caseload in October 2011. (author abstract) 

    Between October 2007 and October 2011, the long-term disabled caseload in Maryland grew by over 80%, compared to only 40% for the total Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) caseload in the state. In order to better understand this growing population, this report provides a snapshot of Maryland’s long-term disabled TCA caseload in October 2011. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle K.; Douglas, Sarah; Pavetti, LaDonna
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) shifted the emphasis of the welfare system from providing ongoing cash assistance to needy individuals to moving them into jobs. This shift created new expectations and opportunities for nearly all poor families seeking government assistance, including those facing multiple and significant barriers to employment. In the past, these hard-to-employ individuals were rarely required to meet work requirements, either by working or participating in an approved work activity. As a result, few states had specialized services to address barriers to employment. With the new emphasis on work, however, programs targeted to hard-to-employ welfare recipients have recently emerged in an effort to help these individuals find and keep a job.

    In this report, we profile the efforts of four states (Florida, Oregon, Tennessee, and Utah) to address the mental health conditions of welfare recipients, one of the many barriers that they may face. This report is based on the findings from a study that Mathematica...

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) shifted the emphasis of the welfare system from providing ongoing cash assistance to needy individuals to moving them into jobs. This shift created new expectations and opportunities for nearly all poor families seeking government assistance, including those facing multiple and significant barriers to employment. In the past, these hard-to-employ individuals were rarely required to meet work requirements, either by working or participating in an approved work activity. As a result, few states had specialized services to address barriers to employment. With the new emphasis on work, however, programs targeted to hard-to-employ welfare recipients have recently emerged in an effort to help these individuals find and keep a job.

    In this report, we profile the efforts of four states (Florida, Oregon, Tennessee, and Utah) to address the mental health conditions of welfare recipients, one of the many barriers that they may face. This report is based on the findings from a study that Mathematica Policy Research (MPR) conducted for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. This study was designed with three purposes in mind: (1) to identify and provide detailed information about the design and structure of mental health services developed by state and local welfare offices to address the mental health needs of welfare recipients, (2) to highlight options for delivering these services, and (3) to discuss the key implementation challenges involved in and the lessons learned from providing mental health services to welfare recipients.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Barden, Bret
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    A significant number of TANF clients have a disability of some type that may impact their service needs. But assessing clients’ needs can prove difficult for TANF programs and staff.  This brief describes different approaches to disability-related needs assessment used by some TANF programs, and offers points for TANF administrators to consider in choosing assessment approaches. (author abstract) 

    A significant number of TANF clients have a disability of some type that may impact their service needs. But assessing clients’ needs can prove difficult for TANF programs and staff.  This brief describes different approaches to disability-related needs assessment used by some TANF programs, and offers points for TANF administrators to consider in choosing assessment approaches. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Dreilinger, Danielle; Timmons, Jaimie C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    On August 22, 1996, President Clinton signed into law the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). One of the many stated goals under PRWORA was to encourage recipients of welfare to improve their economic status by returning to or entering employment. The emphasis on employment presents challenges for welfare caseworkers who must assist individuals in acquiring the necessary skills and training to enter employment. People with disabilities offer an additional challenge to caseworkers who in the past were not required to be familiar with disability-specific public supports, disability rights protections, and employment supports.

    This study examined how welfare reform affected Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) case-workers in Massachusetts who may work with individuals with disabilities and investigated how their roles as caseworkers have changed since the reform. This brief will describe the findings of this research and share recommendations and resources with welfare caseworkers as they serve individuals with disabilities in...

    On August 22, 1996, President Clinton signed into law the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). One of the many stated goals under PRWORA was to encourage recipients of welfare to improve their economic status by returning to or entering employment. The emphasis on employment presents challenges for welfare caseworkers who must assist individuals in acquiring the necessary skills and training to enter employment. People with disabilities offer an additional challenge to caseworkers who in the past were not required to be familiar with disability-specific public supports, disability rights protections, and employment supports.

    This study examined how welfare reform affected Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) case-workers in Massachusetts who may work with individuals with disabilities and investigated how their roles as caseworkers have changed since the reform. This brief will describe the findings of this research and share recommendations and resources with welfare caseworkers as they serve individuals with disabilities in their caseloads. Although the findings are specifically related to DTA caseworkers in Massachusetts, it is our hope that the strategies provided are relevant to caseworkers in other states as well. (author abstract)

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