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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nelson, Justine G.; Gibson, Priscilla A.; Bauer, Jean W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Several U.S. social policies identify kinship care as the preferred out-of-home placement. However, financial assistance to defray the cost of kinship caregiving is limited. One option is the child-only welfare grant. This study investigates kinship households' eligibility for, utilization of, and educational benefits associated with these grants. Most kinship households are eligible for these grants, which in 2003 provided a median monthly benefit of $227. However, analysis of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data indicates that few eligible kinship households receive the grants. Regression analysis indicates that an increase in this amount of monthly household income during adolescence is associated with a 7% greater likelihood of kinship youth graduating from high school. (author abstract)

    Several U.S. social policies identify kinship care as the preferred out-of-home placement. However, financial assistance to defray the cost of kinship caregiving is limited. One option is the child-only welfare grant. This study investigates kinship households' eligibility for, utilization of, and educational benefits associated with these grants. Most kinship households are eligible for these grants, which in 2003 provided a median monthly benefit of $227. However, analysis of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data indicates that few eligible kinship households receive the grants. Regression analysis indicates that an increase in this amount of monthly household income during adolescence is associated with a 7% greater likelihood of kinship youth graduating from high school. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Dell, Kelley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    ...

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Snyder, E.H.; Lawrence, C.N.; Weatherholt, T.N.; Nagy, P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    The engagement of families in child welfare services is critical for successful outcomes related to safety, permanency, and child and family well-being. Motivational interviewing (MI), an effective approach to working with individuals struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, has great appeal for use with families involved with the child welfare system. Consequently, many social service agencies are beginning to integrate MI into their training curriculum. However, research has shown that training in MI alone is not enough; ongoing coaching is crucial in order to transfer learned MI skills into practice. The current study employs qualitative interview data from case-workers in order to examine the implementation of MI and long-term coaching within the child welfare system. Findings showed that MI can be implemented successfully within the child welfare system, and that caseworkers believed MI, supported by ongoing coaching, to be a valuable tool in engaging families in the assessment process.(author abstract)

    The engagement of families in child welfare services is critical for successful outcomes related to safety, permanency, and child and family well-being. Motivational interviewing (MI), an effective approach to working with individuals struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, has great appeal for use with families involved with the child welfare system. Consequently, many social service agencies are beginning to integrate MI into their training curriculum. However, research has shown that training in MI alone is not enough; ongoing coaching is crucial in order to transfer learned MI skills into practice. The current study employs qualitative interview data from case-workers in order to examine the implementation of MI and long-term coaching within the child welfare system. Findings showed that MI can be implemented successfully within the child welfare system, and that caseworkers believed MI, supported by ongoing coaching, to be a valuable tool in engaging families in the assessment process.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meyers, Marcia K.; Gornick, Janet C.; Peck, Laura R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    This paper addresses a gap in state-level comparative social policy research by analyzing policies that support low-income families with children. Variation in state policy “packages” is measured by considering three characteristics of 11 social programs. Individual measures of policy are found to be weakly and inconsistently inter-correlated at the state level, but when cluster analysis is used to analyze multiple dimensions simultaneously, five clusters or regime types are identified that have distinctive policy approaches. These range from the most minimal provisions, to conservative approaches emphasizing private responsibility, to integrated approaches that combine generous direct assistance with employment support and policies that enforce family responsibility. A comparison of a subset of programs at two points in time (1994 and 1998) suggests that states made substantial changes in cash assistance and taxation policies after the 1996 federal welfare reforms. The magnitude and direction of these changes remained consistent with the state clusters identified in 1994. (...

    This paper addresses a gap in state-level comparative social policy research by analyzing policies that support low-income families with children. Variation in state policy “packages” is measured by considering three characteristics of 11 social programs. Individual measures of policy are found to be weakly and inconsistently inter-correlated at the state level, but when cluster analysis is used to analyze multiple dimensions simultaneously, five clusters or regime types are identified that have distinctive policy approaches. These range from the most minimal provisions, to conservative approaches emphasizing private responsibility, to integrated approaches that combine generous direct assistance with employment support and policies that enforce family responsibility. A comparison of a subset of programs at two points in time (1994 and 1998) suggests that states made substantial changes in cash assistance and taxation policies after the 1996 federal welfare reforms. The magnitude and direction of these changes remained consistent with the state clusters identified in 1994. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blanchard, Kimberly A.; Sexton, Chris C.; Morgenstern, Jon; McVeigh, Katharine H.; McCrady, Barbara S.; Morgan, Thomas J.; Irwin, Thomas W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The present study sought to characterize well-being indicators for a sample of children of substance dependent TANF women. Participants were 372 mothers meeting DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence and 156 non-substance abusing women from two urban counties in New Jersey. Children of substance dependent TANF mothers experienced significant vulnerabilities, as demonstrated by higher levels of contextual risk factors and negative behavioral and emotional and school outcomes. Overall, these rates were about double those found in children of non-substance abusing mothers. Results highlight the need for multi-systemic services to address the problems experienced by substance abusing TANF women and their children.(author abstract)

    The present study sought to characterize well-being indicators for a sample of children of substance dependent TANF women. Participants were 372 mothers meeting DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence and 156 non-substance abusing women from two urban counties in New Jersey. Children of substance dependent TANF mothers experienced significant vulnerabilities, as demonstrated by higher levels of contextual risk factors and negative behavioral and emotional and school outcomes. Overall, these rates were about double those found in children of non-substance abusing mothers. Results highlight the need for multi-systemic services to address the problems experienced by substance abusing TANF women and their children.(author abstract)

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